ONS Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter’s P is for Posture When Sitting or During Chores!

OSTEO_graphicMost Americans spend too much time sitting and should take advantage of these tips to help keep good posture.

First, when sitting in a chair make sure your buttocks is all the way to the back of the chair. Using a lumbar roll in the small of your back will help to keep optimal alignment.

Second, if you  sit at a computer, your monitor should be at eye level, feet firmly on floor, hands and wrists in a straight line, shoulders back and elbows at 90 degrees. A break from sitting every 30 minutes will relieve your back of stresses placed on it while sitting. For a more detailed guide to improve seated posture, download Work Station Ergonomics  as a reference.

Posture is equally important when doing chores. While working, make sure your lower back is in a neutral position to avoid a forward curve in your spine. Watching your posture over the years will help avoid vertebral compression fractures due to osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis, or thinning bones, can result in painful fractures. Risk factors for osteoporosisosteoporosis include aging, being female, low body weight, low sex hormones or menopause, smoking, and some medications.

To learn more about osteoporosis, bone anatomy, fracture prevention exercises to promote bone health, updates on treatments, measures to promote strong bones and personal risk factors, register to attend a free health seminar on October 14, 2014 at Greenwich Hospital in the Noble Conference Room.  The panel of speaker include ONS Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Greenwich Hospital Endocrinologist Renee Ileva, MD and ONS Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter, PT, CLT . After the seminar you will be able to ask the doctors and therapist questions.

Osteoporosis Seminar: Prevention, Treatment and Management – November 16 at Greenwich Hospital

 

 

 

 

 

Osteoporosis, a disease that deteriorates bone and leads to fractures, affects 28 million Americans and contributes to an estimated 1.5 million bone fractures every year.  Half of all women older than 65 and one in five men is affected by osteoporosis.  On Wednesday, November 16 at 7 p.m., orthopedic surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, endocrinologist Yi-Hao Yu, MD and physical therapist Betsy Kreuter, PT of ONS (Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC) will present Osteoporosis: Prevention, Treatment and Management in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital located at 5 Perryridge Road. Topics to be covered include bone anatomy, osteoporosis risk factors and exercise to promote strong bones. The program is free and open to the public. Registration is requested. To register, call 203-863-3627 or register online at www.greenhosp.org.  For more information on topics related to orthopedics, sports medicine and neurosurgery, visit www.onsmd.com.

 

Talk at Greenwich Hospital on Osteoporosis


Osteoporosis, or significant bone loss, affects 28 million Americans and contributes to an estimated 1.5 million bone fractures every year. The condition, which affects half of all women older than 65, and one in five men, is the topic of a talk by Orthopedist Steven Hindman, MD, Endocrinologist Judith Goldberg Berman, MD and Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter, PT tonight at 7 p.m. at Greenwich Hospital, Noble Conference Center.

Seminar participants will learn about bone anatomy, personal risk factors and the latest treatments for osteoporosis.

They will also see demonstrations of exercises that help prevent fractures and hear about other measures that may help promote strong bones. The program is free and open to the public. Registration is requested. To register, call Greenwich Hospital at 203-863-3627 or 888-357-2409.

Bone Health is focus of Osteoporosis Seminar

Osteoporosis, a condition which causes bones to become weak and susceptible to breaks, affects over 10 million Americans and contributes to an estimated 1.5 million bone fractures every year. The condition, which affects half of all women older than 65, and one in five men, was the topic of a seminar sponsored by the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education on Tuesday night at ONS on Valley Drive. Orthopedic surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Endocrinologist Judith Goldberg Berman, MD and Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter, PT spoke before a group of 40 about bone anatomy, personal risk factors and the latest treatments for osteoporosis.

After defining osteoporosis, Dr. Goldberg-Berman’s talked about how the condition is diagnosed and the variety of ways it is treated. She said a bone density test is the best method currently available for diagnosing bone loss, however there are other indicators to consider, and in some cases, just the incidence of a spinal compression fracture is an indication of osteoporosis.  Although she believes that each patient needs to be assessed individually, she said that ingesting sufficient levels of calcium and vitamin D are extremely important to maintain good bone health. Once a positive diagnosis has been made, treatment may vary from patient to patient depending on age, medical history and lifestyle considerations. “Bisphosphonates like Fosamax and Boniva have been in the press a lot recently. Some studies have shown there are associated risks, but in many cases there are other studies that dispute those findings,” says Goldberg-Berman. “For some women, estrogen is an effective bone builder even though there are risks that make it not a good option for others. Medication, diet and exercise should all be considered when treating this potentially serious condition.” Continue reading “Bone Health is focus of Osteoporosis Seminar”