Another Award for Dr. Sethi

 

Congratulations to ONS orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Paul Sethi, who has earned the 2018 AAOS Achievement Award again this year from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.  The AAOS Award recognizes members for their active volunteer efforts and their contributions to education, research and advocacy in the profession of orthopedic surgery. Dr. Sethi received this prestigious award in 2017 as well.

A sports medicine, shoulder and knee specialist, Dr. Sethi is also a leading research physician who speaks at academic and instructional medical conferences in the US and abroad. His research on surgical advances for the shoulder, elbow and knee is regularly published in leading medical journals including the Journal for Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, Arthroscopy, and the Journal of American Academy for Orthopaedic Surgery. He also collaborates with outside companies for education and research purposes and to develop medical procedures on the shoulder, elbow and knee. He is a member of the prestigious American Shoulder and Elbow Society and American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons.

As President of the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education,  Dr. Sethi’s research has recently included clinical study of the use of a long lasting analgesic, Exparel, during surgery. This will reduce the need for opioids to control post-surgical pain; the establishment of better methods for surgical skin preparation (cleaning) to lower the risk of surgical infection; development of a new technique to repair chronic or weakened biceps tendons; and the evaluation of surgical needles in tendon surgery to establish international guidelines on needle use.

ONS Dr. Seth Miller is Featured in WAG

Top shoulder surgeon Dr. Seth Miller is featured in an article titled “A (Medical) Shoulder to Lean On” in the October issue of  the Westchester magazine, WAG. The piece, written by Jane Dove, was released online on September 26, 2017.  Ms. Dove delivers a comprehensive view of Dr. Miller’s distinguished career and founding prinicple of ONS, one of the region’s premier orthopedic and neurosurgical practices.  She is also able to capture the unique formula that sets ONS apart from the competition:  the highest standard of care, the collaborative approach among specialists in the practice and patients, and the compassion for patients’ individual conditions and treatment goals.

The entire article is copied below:

A (MEDICAL) SHOULDER TO LEAN ON  by Jane Dove

“I am personally very proud of our practice — Orthopaedic & Neurosurgery Specialists (ONS) and the way we treat each patient as an individual,” says Seth R. Miller, an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in arthroscopic shoulder surgery and shoulder replacement.

With offices in Greenwich and Stamford and now Harrison, ONS takes a conservative approach to patient care. “We recommend surgery to only about 10 percent of our patients,” says Miller, who is also a clinical assistant professor of orthopedic surgery at the Hospital for Joint Diseases; a staff orthopedic physician at Greenwich Hospital and an assistant attending physician in orthopedic surgery at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. “We want to make sure it is really needed, because we realize that surgery in any of our subspecialties is a traumatic event for our patients. If it can be avoided, so much the better.”

A leading specialist in shoulder replacement surgery with 1,000 total shoulder and reverse shoulder replacements to his credit, Miller helped found ONS in 1998. There he remains committed to providing excellent orthopedic and neurosurgical care through professional cooperation while showing compassion for patients. By setting the highest of standards, ONS can offer patients a wide range of choices that leads to the best possible outcomes.

“For example, if needed, we will have two surgeons involved in a complicated procedure,” he says. “We do everything we can to ensure the results our patients get are the very best possible. And we deliver those results with compassion and understanding along the way.”

SPOTLIGHT ON SHOULDERS

After graduating from Harvard University in 1978, Miller went on to get his M.D. at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, followed by a residency in general surgery and then a sought-after one-year residency in shoulder surgery at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center.

“I studied under the renowned Dr. Charles S. Neer, who offered me this wonderful opportunity,” he says. “I was always interested in the shoulder and had a great year with him, from l988 to 1989. At about the same time, I met another shoulder specialist who invited me to join him at Greenwich Hospital.”

Miller says Greenwich had many orthopedic surgeons on staff but most practiced in the general area. “I did my share of general orthopedic surgery but really wanted to do as much shoulder surgery as possible. I spoke with several other subspecialists who, like me, wanted to improve patient care by combining several of our doctor’s groups into one entity.”

In 1998, the group took the plunge and founded ONS, starting with only eight physicians.

EXPANSION

ONS now has 22 subspecialty physicians trained in orthopedic surgery, sports medicine, physical medicine and rehabilitation.

“Things really took off when patients realized they could get specialty care of the highest quality right in Greenwich. We now have two specialists for every part of the body.”

The successful reception ONS earned from the local patient community there led to its expansion, first to Stamford and then to a new facility in Harrison.

Miller says he believed one of the keys to the success of ONS has been the one-stop approach the practice offers.

“Our patients just love that we can provide so much under one roof,” he says. “Everything is right here and there is no need to trek from outside office to outside office for tests, scans and blood work. We function as a team of doctors and other medical professionals, working closely and seamlessly together.”

If a question about care or a procedure that can best be answered by another specialist comes up, Miller says, “All we have to do is walk down the hall. Patients find this very comforting and we pride ourselves as working as a collaborative team. At ONS you get the best possible care all under one roof. While our practice is large, it is very effective and attuned to the patient, what he or she really needs.”

SATISFIED PATIENTS

He believes ONS is well-served, as are its patients, by not being a part of a larger patient care “network system.” The proof is in the response. “We get positive feedback in the 96 to 97 percent range,” he says.

“As a result, we are not controlled so much by cost-cutting to enhance the bottom line of the network. As a private practice, we control our own destiny and even have our own foundation. We are free and now big enough to control our financial destiny on our own.”

Considering Joint Replacement?

If pain in your knee, hip or shoulder joint is interfering with your quality of life, it may be time to consider joint replacement.Joint replacement surgery

Join shoulder replacement surgeon Seth Miller, MD, and hip and knee replacement surgeon Frank Ennis, MD, to learn all about the advances in joint replacement procedures and what to expect from your first office visit through the recovery process.  Dr. Miller and Dr. Ennis will be joined by Greenwich Hospital staff who will outline the particulars of your hospital stay.  There will be time to have your questions answered at the conclusion of the program.

Joint Replacement Symposium

WHEN:  Wednesday, April 5, 2017

WHERE: Greenwich Hospital Noble Auditorium

TIME: 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

SEATING IS LIMITED. Please register on line or by calling 203-863-4277.

New Pain Reducing Procedure Studied by ONS Orthopedic Surgeons

GREENWICH ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON DR. PAUL SETHI AND THE ONS PRACTICE WERE FEATURED IN AN ARTICLE IN GREENWICH PATCH FOR USING A NEW PAIN-REDUCING PROCEDURE THAT CAN REDUCE OR ELIMINATE THE NEED FOR NARCOTICS.

In the article, Greenwich Surgeon Strives to Combat Opioid Epidemic with New Procedure, Greenwich Patch staff writer, Rich Scinto, wrote that oftentimes opioid addiction begins after surgery. 

Following is the article in its entirety:
Opioids post-surgery have become a double-edged sword in the wake of an increasing addiction epidemic. While they have great pain-reducing powers, they also carry the risk of addiction and the chance that pills can fall into the hands of an addict.

A group of orthopedic surgeons based in Greenwich are using a new pain-relieving method that helps reduce a patient’s reliance on opioids.

Dr. Paul Sethi with Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists recently has seen collegiate athletes in need of surgery who are willing to suffer great amounts of pain if it means staying off of opioids post-surgery.

“Young people are becoming more aware of how dangerous of a problem it is,” Sethi said about opioid addiction.

It is also frightening as a surgeon to think that an opioid prescription that is intended to help a patient recover could lead to death or a lifelong battle with addiction, he said.

Sethi has been performing shoulder replacement surgeries with the use of Exparel, which is an injection of long-lasting liposomal bupivacaine that can last for three days post-surgery. Some patients have used no narcotics or a greatly reduced amount after the surgery, Sethi said.

Instead of prescribing 30 narcotic pills post-surgery generally there is only a need to prescribe 10, he said. That translates to less pills that could fall into an addict’s hands.

The prescription of opioid pain relievers has skyrocketed. In 2013 health-care providers wrote 259 million prescriptions, enough for every American adult to have a bottle of pills, according to the CDC.

About 70 percent of opioids used for non-medical reasons are obtained through family or friends and 18 percent through a prescribing doctor, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

Sethi and others are conducting a peer-reviewed study about Exparel’s effectiveness in reducing pain after surgery.

Sethi and others at the practice plan to expand the use of Exparel to other types of shoulder surgery and there is potential to use it in operations such as ACL repairs. The injection has to be specifically tailored to each surgery in order for it to be effective, he said.

Surgeons should spend a good amount of time educating their patients about pain management and the potential for opioid abuse.

“In medicine we are pressed for time, but I think this is one of the most important things we teach our patients about,” he said.

The injection costs about $300 extra, which is a bargain if it can save a person from an overdose death or a long struggle with addiction, Sethi said.

For now narcotics still are prescribed in case pain comes back after Exparel wears off.

ONS Shoulder Surgeon Katherine B. Vadasdi, MD, is Published

STUDY FINDS SUCCESS IN TREATMENT FOR FROZEN SHOULDER.Dr. Katharine Vadasdi, Shoulder Surgeon

Promising results of a new study by ONS orthopedic shoulder surgeon Katherine Vadasdi, MD and other researchers were published this month in the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. The study, The Effect of Myofibroblasts and Corticosteroid Injections in Adhesive Capsulitis, was conducted to investigate the effect  that steroid injections administered directly into the shoulder joint would have on the painful and limiting condition called Adhesive Capsulitis.

Also known as Frozen Shoulder, Adhesive Capsulitis is a common, severely painful condition that leads to stiffness and reduced range of motion in the joint.  In the study, Dr. Vadasdi and the research team evaluated the changes in the lining of the joint that contributes to or causes Frozen Shoulder. They discovered an increase in a certain cell type called myofibroblasts, which cause the capsule surrounding the shoulder joint to contact and form scar tissue, leading to pain and increasing stiffness.  Steroid injections directly into the joint, however, reduced the increase in myofibroblasts, and helped reverse and prevent progression of the condition.

Frozen Shoulder most commonly affects women between the ages of 40 and 60 years.  Most cases of Frozen Shoulder can be resolved non-operatively through stretching, physical therapy, anti-inflammatory medications and cortisone injections.  In severe cases, a procedure known as arthroscopic capsular release is performed to break up the adhesions. The findings in Dr. Vadasdi’s study suggest  a more rapid resolution of the condition and possibly a decrease in cases needing surgery.

The Effect of Myofibroblasts and Corticosteroid Injections in Adhesive Capsulitis, Carolyn M. Hettrich, MD, MPH, Edward F. DiCarlo, MD, Deborah Faryniarz, MD, Katherine B. Vadasdi, MD, Riley Williams, MD, Jo A. Hannafin, MD, PhD. 1274-1279. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery (25) 2016

Dr. Vadasdi is an orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine physician who specializes in conditions of the shoulder, knee and elbow. She is the Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Center at ONS and is a sought after speaker on the topic of women and sports injury and prevention.  Her chosen area of medical specialty reflects her personal interests.  She is an accomplished triathlete, having completed Ironman competitions in 2007 and 2009. Dr. Vadasdi is also an alpine climber and has ascended Mount Kilimanjaro, Mount Rainier, and the Grand Teton, among others.

2016 Joint Replacement Symposium

EnnisWhite
KavanaghWhit3
Miller

Considering Joint Replacement Surgery?

If severe joint pain is interfering with your enjoyment of daily life, come hear orthopedic surgeons Frank Ennis, MD, Brian Kavanagh, MD and Seth Miller, MD, from ONS and Greenwich Hospital joint replacement specialists present an informative and comprehensive panel discussion about the latest advances in joint replacement surgery. From your first office appointment through surgery and recovery, you will learn what to expect before, during and after the procedure. Topics will include computer-assisted surgery, minimally-invasive & muscle sparing techniques, pain management and physical rehabilitation. There will be an opportunity to have your questions answered following the presentation.

Double Shoulder Replacement Restores Mobility

SHOULDER REPLACEMENT REGAINS HIS ACTIVE LIFESTYLE JUST MONTHS FOLLOWING SURGERY. 

Arthritis had taken its toll on Dave’s shoulders. He was in constant pain. Sleeping was difficult and it was nearly impossible for him to take part in activities that he loves.  Then, two friends with similar shoulder issuesD.Hapke in Kayak referred Dave to shoulder surgeon, Dr. Seth Miller at ONS.  “When I met him, I immediately knew he was the doctor I wanted to care for me. He was thorough, thoughtful and patient. He has a great bedside manner and took the time to completely answer all my questions,” he recalled. 

Dave had his first shoulder replacement in January, 2013; the second one was done a year later. In both instances, the therapists had him doing exercises the day after surgery, which he continued at home within the week. Through a physical therapy program over the next few months, Dave was able to build muscle mass to help support his new shoulders.

Just 16 weeks after surgery, Dave was back on the water kayaking pain free. These days, he goes to the gym 2- 3 times a week and kayaks quite a bit on ponds, lakes and streams. He can even carry his  kayak.

“I am so grateful to have my active life back, thanks to ONS!” he said.

Shoulder replacement surgery and reverse shoulder replacement surgery is not for everyone. In many cases, treatment such as icing, anti-inflammatory medication and physical therapy can help get shoulder pain from arthritis under control. However, if pain persists, as it did with Dave, it may be time to consider a surgical option, notes Dr. Miller.

With arthritis and some fractures and injuries, the cartilage of the shoulder gradually wears away, creating a situation where bone is rubbing against bone. The resulting inflammation is extremely painful and makes shoulder mobility progressively more difficult. This condition typically develops later in life and gets worse over time.

The shoulder replacement procedure replaces the damaged joint with a highly-polished metal ball attached to a stem and a plastic socket. As long as a patient has an intact functioning rotator cuff, it can be an extremely successful procedure.

However, there is a group of patients that not only have significant cartilage damage in their shoulder, but also have a torn rotator cuff that is beyond repair. The rotator cuff is a group of muscles that run from the shoulder blade to the upper arm and allows patient to elevate their arm. Twenty years ago, treatment options were limited. In 2004, the FDA approved a reverse shoulder replacement procedure that was being used successfully overseas.

The surgery takes about two hours and involves a small incision, usually about three to four inches in length. Patients can expect to stay in the hospital somewhere from one to three days. Further, patients will be released with their arm in a sling, and undergo exercises to reestablish range of motion with the joint.

Between four and eight weeks after surgery, patients should be able to raise their arms above their heads without pain. Three to four months after surgery, patients are gradually resuming the activities of daily living. Many patients remark after recovery that they feel like they’ve been given their life back.

ONS’ Dr. Seth Miller was one of the first in the metropolitan area to perform reverse shoulder replacement surgery. He will take part in a Joint Replacement Symposium at Greenwich Hospital with ONS colleagues and joint replacement surgeons Drs. Frank Ennis and Brian Kavanagh.

The event will be held on Wed. May 11 starting at 6 p.m.  To register, call 203-863-4277 or online.

Youth Rugby Safety Talk

ONS SPORTS MEDICINE SPECIALIST MARC S. KOWALSKY, MD, TO SPEAK ABOUT YOUTH RUGBY SAFETY ON MAY 4 

Dr. Marc Kowalsky will discuss safe participation in youth rugby, the fastest growing sport among young athletes in the United StKowalskyMD_WorldRugbyPacificNationsCupates.

The informative lecture for coaches, players and parents of players presented by the Rye Rugby Club will take place on Wednesday, May 4 beginning at 7 pm at the Rye High School Performing Arts Center at One Parsons Street in Rye New York.

Dr. Kowalsky will draw from his extensive experience caring for rugby players at every level of competition in this discussion of strategies for injury prevention. Topics will include optimal diet and nutrition, as well as strength and conditioning in these athletes.  Dr. Kowalsky will also touch on the value of protective equipment in youth rugby. The critical role of coaching and officiating in maintaining safety of the game will be covered, as will prevention and management of concussion. The importance of collaboration among parents, coaches, trainers, and physicians will be addressed as well.

A former rugby player, Dr. Kowalsky serves as team physician for the USA Rugby National Team, the White Plains Rugby Football Club, Iona College Rugby Football Club, and the CT State Champion Greenwich High School Rugby Team.

An Added Level of Safety to Young Athletes

THE ORTHO ACCESS PROGRAM AT ONS OFFERS AN ADDED LEVEL OF SAFETY TO YOUNG ATHLETES WHO ARE INJURED ON THE FIELD. 

If you missed yesterday’s  Well column in The New York Timesit focused on the lack of national safety standards to protect student athletes from crippling or fatal injuries.  Individual states and theinjured on the field schools within them, for the most part, haven’t yet adopted injury prevention and treatment policies or procedures for children who play organized or league sports either. The responsibility is all too often left to coaches and parents to assess what measures to take when a young athlete is injured and when they can return to play. 500 student athletes died last year due to poor decisions made immediately following injury, according to the article. The ORTHO ACCESS program at ONS is designed to add an extra layer of medical support and injury prevention education for coaches, athletes, and parents. During the first critical moments after a player is hurt,  ONS ORTHO ACCESS sports medicine physicians helps to determine the best immediate course of action to take. Read  more.

 

 

ONS Physicians Open State-of-the-Art Ambulatory Surgery Center

STAMFORD ASC IS A NEW ULTRA-MODERN AMBULATORY SURGERY CENTER DESIGNED SPECIFICALLY FOR ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY AND NEUROSURGERY. Clain ASC_edited-1

The Stamford ASC has recently received Connecticut State Department of Health approval for license and is now open for physicians to treat patients. Stamford ASC specializes in musculoskeletal surgeries and interventional pain management. The center includes two surgical suites built specifically for orthopedic and neurosurgical procedures, equipped with the latest arthroscopic and computer-assisted technology. The facility also has a procedure room for interventional pain management, a comfortable waiting room, and pre-operative and post-operative areas designed for utmost safety, comfort and efficiency. The technologically advanced surgery center offers patients access to the same arthroscopic and open surgery options found in a hospital setting but in a smaller, more comfortable environment.
Entrance 2 (2)

The warm surroundings of the center and emphasis on caring, individualized attention minimizes the stress often associated with surgery. Patients are released within hours of their procedure so they may complete their recovery in the comfort of home. Covered parking and a ground level entrance help make the patient experience as easy and convenient as possible.
“The Stamford ASC is the result of several years of research and planning, which began when ONS partners with a shared mission set out to build an industry-leading surgical care facility,” said Mark Camel, M.D., one of the Stamford ASC partners.

Formed by 14 experienced and respected orthopedic surgeons and neurosurgeons affiliated with Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists (ONS) in Greenwich and Stamford CT, the Stamford ASC reflects the standard of excellence that patients have come to expect from surgeons at ONS. “In the current healthcare environment, patients are looking for a more personalized surgery experience that is first and foremost, safe and efficient,” said Dr. James Cunningham, Medical Director of Stamford ASC. “This center will provide service that meets, if not exceeds, the most stringent Government safety requirements and infection controls.” The center was surveyed and approved by the Connecticut State Department of Health earlier this month.

“High quality outpatient facilities such as Stamford ASC best position physicians for healthcare industry challenges by combining cost efficiency with cutting edge technology and a new kind of patient experience,” said Dr. Cunningham. “I fully expect that the Stamford ASC will set the standard for efficient, cost-effective and patient-focused care in the region.”

Read the local press coverage in Greenwich Time and on the Daily Voice

New ACL Repair Study

NEW ACL REPAIR STUDY IS PROMISING BUT LIMITED, SAID ONS KNEE SURGEON DEMETRIS DELOS, MD. 

Today’s New York Times reports that using a patient’s own blood to help heal an ACL tear has shown promising results in a small study conducted by the Boston Children’s Hospital.  While having a torn ligament heal itself could be the holy grail of ligament surgery, ONS knee surgeon, Demetris Delos, MD, cautions that more thorough research is ACL-Injury-300dpi-illustrationneeded.  The trial involved only 10 patients and recovery was tracked just a few months after surgery. “These early results are exciting,” Dr. Delos said, “but it is important to see how these patients do in the medium and long term (several years after surgery) especially when it comes to returning to active lifestyles and the trials need to be expanded to much larger groups of  people to see how it translates to the population at large.”  Until the long term safety and efficacy can be determined, he said, current ACL reconstruction surgery, which replaces the injured ligament with a tendon from other areas of the body such as the hamstring or patellar tendon, will remain the standard as it has proven successful with predictable results and allows the majority of patients to return to their pre-injury activities.

Female Athletes and ACL Injuries

DID YOU KNOW THAT FEMALE ATHLETES ARE AS MUCH AS TEN TIMES MORE LIKELY TO SUFFER AN ACL INJURY THAN THEIR MALE COUNTERPARTS? 

Woman playing tennis at the professional tournamentDifferences in pelvis width, the size of the ACL and the intercondylar notch (where the ACL crosses the knee joint), are all thought to play a role. What’s more, the upper part of a female’s shin bone at the joint is much shorter and more rounded than a male’s, which creates a greater laxity in the joint. Women also tend to have an inward angle to their knees, otherwise known as knocked knees, which places more stress across the outer knee joint and ligaments, particularly when it comes to sudden or extreme movements, such as an abrupt change in direction or pivot. Women also move differently than men. For instance, they tend to land from a jump with their knees in a somewhat straight position, pulling on the quadriceps rather than the hamstrings. Because of this, the force of the impact is transferred to the knee, creating a high risk for an ACL rupture. Men, on the other hand, are better able to absorb the impact because they tend to land with bent knees.

For these reasons, it is crucial for female athletes of all ages to modify their natural biomechanics through neuromuscular training programs that can teach them better ways to move their bodies and protect their knees, said orthopedic surgeon Katie Vadasdi, MD, who heads the Women’s Sports Medicine Center at ONS. “Through neuromuscular training programs, we can help female athletes significantly reduce the risk of ACL ruptures by developing balance between the quadriceps and hamstrings and improving the landing biomechanics with more bent knees and hips to avoid a knock-kneed position on impact.”

Preventing ACL injuries has both near and long term benefits so the sooner you get started with this kind of a conditioning program the better. Studies indicate that there is a tenfold increase in the incidence of osteoarthritis in the knees of women who suffered an ACL injury at some point in their lives. Moreover, injuries that were incurred during youth seem to result in the onset of osteoarthritic symptoms at a much earlier age in adulthood.

Learn more about ACL injuries here.

ONS Featured in Greenwich Sentinel

sentinel_logo_transparentYou can learn about the early days of ONS and the philosophy that made us the most comprehensive and advanced practice the region. The writer, Sara Poirier Correa, did an excellent job explaining that with 22 top sub-specialty trained physicians, ONS is able to provide personalized services to patients. The article also highlights the Women’s Sports Medicine Center and the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education, which has published internationally and competes among researchers at larger universities such as Harvard, Yale, and Johns Hopkins. http://bit.ly/1PNTkfh

 

15 ONS Physicians Rated Among Top Doctors in Connecticut

 

ApostolidesWhite  CamelWhite
ClainWhite CunninghamWhite EnnisWhite
FioreWhite  HeftlerWhite  HindmanWhite  KavanaghWhit3  Miller
 NocekWhite  Sethi_White  SimonWhite  VadasdiWhite  CroweWhite

Fifteen orthopedic surgeons with Orthopaedic & Neurosurgery Specialists (ONS) were named among Connecticut’s Top Doctors in a report published this month by Moffly Media. The doctors were selected by Castle Connolly Medical, Ltd, a well-respected national healthcare research and information company.

Among the physicians recognized for medical expertise and excellence were ONS’s entire neurosurgery team — Paul J. Apostolides, MD, Mark H. Camel, MD, Amory J. Fiore, MD and Scott Simon, MD. Orthopedic surgeons, Michael R. Clain, MD, James G. Cunningham, MD, Francis A. Ennis, MD, Steven E. Hindman, MD, Brian P. Kavanagh, MD, Seth R. Miller, MD, David P. Nocek, MD, Paul M. Sethi, MD, and Katherine B. Vadasdi, MD, were ranked among the top in their category as was Jeffrey M. Heftler, MD, for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. John F. Crowe, MD, who retired from ONS at the end of 2015 after 30 years of practice, was one of the leading physicians in his area of specialty, Hand Surgery.

 

ONS Surgeon Demetris Delos, MD Speaks about Knee and Shoulder Conditions on Health IQ

Demetris Delos, MD
Demetris Delos, MD

ONS orthopaedic surgeon Demetris Delos, MD, was a featured guest on Pleasantville Community Television’s series, Health IQ, hosted by Dr. Alan Siegel of ProClinix. During the fascinating thirty-minute interview, Dr. Delos, a specialist in knee and shoulder conditions, spoke in detail about common cartilage, ligament and tendon injuries. Age, gender and type of activity can play a role in a person’s susceptibility to orthopedic problems, he said. Using models and computer generated images, Dr. Delos described the non-surgical and surgical options to repair or replace damaged tissue and joints.  Functional and strength training, he stressed, are key for injury prevention and rehabilitation. Dr. Delos also provided a glimpse into future treatments including the development of synthetic tissue products and the advances in biologic medicine which uses biomedical materials such as blood, platelets and stem cells to treat pain and complex, often chronic conditions of the musculoskeletal system.

 

 

 

Suffer from Bunion Pain? Dr. Clain Offers Solutions

Michael Clain, MD
Michael Clain, MD

Bunions are a common deformity encountered in the foot where the big toe is out of alignment. This creates pain in that toe and often in the lesser toes as well. The deformity makes it difficult to find shoes that fit comfortably.  Ill-fitting shoes can contribute to the situation but the underlying deformity is genetic. This is why most patients can recall a parent or grandparent that had the problem.

In consultation, I often tell patients that the options are to accommodate the foot with wider shoes, gentle arch supports and sometimes padding or I encourage them to consider surgery.  The decision to proceed with surgery should be based on the overall level of discomfort and deformity.  This will differ from patient to patient.  It is rare that the patient that must have bunion surgery.  Most people will choose surgery due to the accumulation of annoyances, discomfort, pain and deformity in other toes.

Actual X-ray of patient of Dr. Clain before bunion surgery
X-ray of patient of Dr. Clain before bunion surgery
Same Patient. Post-Bunionechotmy
Same Patient. Post-Bunionechotmy

It is very important, from my point of view, to communicate realistic expectations for the procedure and the ultimate result. I try hard to be very specific about the time involved in recovery and give every patient a written “expected surgical recovery.” It is obviously difficult to remember everything when you as the patient are given a great deal of information so it’s helpful to have a summary to refer to.

Not all bunions are the same. Routinely, I perform about six different surgical procedures.  The goal is to do the most appropriate operation for your particular foot and circumstance.  With careful communication and a well thought-out plan it is highly likely that we should be able to get a great result for almost any foot.”

For more information about Dr. Clain, click here.

If you suffer from bunions and would like to attend a free seminar on foot pain Dr. Yakavonis of ONS and Greenwich Hospital will present Solutions for Foot & Ankle Pain: Beyond Foot Massage is an orthopedic surgeon specializing in foot and ankle surgery. He will present treatments and surgical techniques for bunions and other foot deformities. Learn more and register online here.

07/10/2019

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