What do you do when you are diagnosed with an old (chronic) Achilles tendon rupture?

Mark Yakavonis, MD, MMS, is an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in foot and ankle surgery. Dr. Yakavonis has expertise in treating a variety of foot pain and deformity related conditions including Achilles tendonitis, ankle instability, cartilage injuries, bunions and hammer toes.  His practice will also focus on youth athlete sports injuries and the types of injuries seen in field athletes, gymnasts and ballet dancers.

Achilles tendon ruptures will often not be discovered for months after the injury. In the months between injury and showing up at the doctor’s office, the torn tendon develops scar tissue which decreased the quality and elasticity of the tissue. Because of this, directly repairing the torn tendon, as is done in an acute injury, becomes is less than ideal. In this situation, we will supplement the tendon repair with a tendon transfer. Essentially, we borrow a tendon that bends the big toe (there is another tendon that compensates when it is borrowed), reroute it, and reattach it to the heel bone. This does two very important things:

1. It supplements the strength of the torn Achilles, allowing a quicker and better recovery.

2. It provides improved blood supply to the Achilles repair, providing healing factors to the area of diseased tendon.

In summary, ruptures of the Achilles Foot_AnklePictendon are increasingly common in our aging yet increasingly active population. In cases where an Achilles rupture is missed or the rupture cannot be repaired directly under normal tension, adding the flexor hallicus longus tendon transfer allows for significantly improved results with a shorter recovery.

If you suffer from foot and ankle pain and would like to attend a free seminar, Dr. Yakavonis of ONS is an orthopedic surgeon specializing in foot and ankle surgery, and Greenwich Hospital will present Solutions for Foot & Ankle Pain: Beyond Foot Massage . He will present treatments and surgical techniques for bunions and other foot deformities. Learn more and register online here.

07/10/2019

ONS Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter’s P is for Posture When Sitting or During Chores!

OSTEO_graphicMost Americans spend too much time sitting and should take advantage of these tips to help keep good posture.

First, when sitting in a chair make sure your buttocks is all the way to the back of the chair. Using a lumbar roll in the small of your back will help to keep optimal alignment.

Second, if you  sit at a computer, your monitor should be at eye level, feet firmly on floor, hands and wrists in a straight line, shoulders back and elbows at 90 degrees. A break from sitting every 30 minutes will relieve your back of stresses placed on it while sitting. For a more detailed guide to improve seated posture, download Work Station Ergonomics  as a reference.

Posture is equally important when doing chores. While working, make sure your lower back is in a neutral position to avoid a forward curve in your spine. Watching your posture over the years will help avoid vertebral compression fractures due to osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis, or thinning bones, can result in painful fractures. Risk factors for osteoporosisosteoporosis include aging, being female, low body weight, low sex hormones or menopause, smoking, and some medications.

To learn more about osteoporosis, bone anatomy, fracture prevention exercises to promote bone health, updates on treatments, measures to promote strong bones and personal risk factors, register to attend a free health seminar on October 14, 2014 at Greenwich Hospital in the Noble Conference Room.  The panel of speaker include ONS Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Greenwich Hospital Endocrinologist Renee Ileva, MD and ONS Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter, PT, CLT . After the seminar you will be able to ask the doctors and therapist questions.