What do you do when you are diagnosed with an old (chronic) Achilles tendon rupture?

Mark Yakavonis, MD, MMS, is an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in foot and ankle surgery. Dr. Yakavonis has expertise in treating a variety of foot pain and deformity related conditions including Achilles tendonitis, ankle instability, cartilage injuries, bunions and hammer toes.  His practice will also focus on youth athlete sports injuries and the types of injuries seen in field athletes, gymnasts and ballet dancers.

Achilles tendon ruptures will often not be discovered for months after the injury. In the months between injury and showing up at the doctor’s office, the torn tendon develops scar tissue which decreased the quality and elasticity of the tissue. Because of this, directly repairing the torn tendon, as is done in an acute injury, becomes is less than ideal. In this situation, we will supplement the tendon repair with a tendon transfer. Essentially, we borrow a tendon that bends the big toe (there is another tendon that compensates when it is borrowed), reroute it, and reattach it to the heel bone. This does two very important things:

1. It supplements the strength of the torn Achilles, allowing a quicker and better recovery.

2. It provides improved blood supply to the Achilles repair, providing healing factors to the area of diseased tendon.

In summary, ruptures of the Achilles Foot_AnklePictendon are increasingly common in our aging yet increasingly active population. In cases where an Achilles rupture is missed or the rupture cannot be repaired directly under normal tension, adding the flexor hallicus longus tendon transfer allows for significantly improved results with a shorter recovery.

If you suffer from foot and ankle pain and would like to attend a free seminar, Dr. Yakavonis of ONS is an orthopedic surgeon specializing in foot and ankle surgery, and Greenwich Hospital will present Solutions for Foot & Ankle Pain: Beyond Foot Massage . He will present treatments and surgical techniques for bunions and other foot deformities. Learn more and register online here.

07/10/2019

Greenwich Hospital New Mini-Med Seminar series begins with talk on Joint Disease by Paul Sethi, MD

Paul Sethi, MD
Orthopaedic surgeon Paul Sethi, MD

On Wednesday, March 13 at 6:30-7:30 p.m., Greenwich Hospital will begin a new Mini-Med Seminar series. The first program, “Let’s talk about Joints: Degenerative Joint Disease (DJD); Causes, Symptoms and Treatments,” will be presented by ONS orthopaedic Surgeon Dr. Paul Sethi in Hospital’s Noble Conference Center at 5 Perryridge Road. Attendance is free. To register, call 203-863-4277 or 888-305-9253, or register online.

Also known as osteoarthritis, DJD affects over 30 percent of the US population over age 65 and is characterized by joint pain and stiffness and a progressive loss of mobility. DJD occurs when the cartilage that cushions the joint breaks down and begins to wear away. By 2030, a projected 67 million people will have been diagnosed with DJD. Understanding the latest research on the causes of the disease and the surgical and non-surgical treatment options will be the focus of this seminar. Dr. Paul Sethi, who is also President of the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education, will lead this educational and interactive program.

Greenwich Hospital Mini-Med seminars offers tuition-free monthly programs that focus on basic anatomy and physiology, common disease conditions, and possible cures and treatment options. The series aims to introduce the public to the science of human health and the groundbreaking changes taking place in the field of medicine today. The audience will gain a greater awareness of significant health issues, and about the role of medical research in advancing healthcare. The seminars are presented by Greenwich Hospital staff physicians and are designed to be causal and highly informative. No science or medical background required! Ample time will be given to a question and answer period. Whether you’re a student, teacher, caregiver, healthcare provider, or someone with an interest in research and medicine, you will gain a better understanding of basic terms and medical concepts from the seminars.