Regenerative Medicine for Sports Injuries and Chronic Conditions

Surgery was once the only option to repair damaged cartilage, ligament and tendon injuries and some arthritic conditions.  Advances in biologic and regenerative medicine are changing that.  Sports medicine specialist, Dr. Tim Greene will explain the new biologic treatments in use today that are helping help patients heal from within to repair, and in some instances, regrow damaged tissue that either lack a natural healing environment or have not properly healed after injury.  Free.  Please register by calling 888-305-9253 or online.

Synthetic Cartilage Implants

NEW PRODUCT APPROVED FOR SURGERY HOLDS PROMISE FOR ARTHRITIS SUFFERERS. 

ONS orthopedic foot and ankle surgeon, Dr. Mark Yakavonis, was a guest today on Healthy Frontiersa White Plains community television program hosted by Dr. Louis Bisogni.  Dr. Yakavonis discussed a significant new development in the treatment of big toe arthritis that has the future potential to alleviate arthritis pain in larger joints in the body. Dr. Yakavonis and Michael Clain, MD, also of ONS, are among the few orthopedic foot and ankle surgeons in the country who offer this option to their patients.

The new synthetic cartilage implant was approved as a treatment for painful arthritis in the joint of the big toe in July, 2016, but  Dr. Yakavonis explained that it has been a highly effective treatment in Canada, Europe and Brazil since 2002.  The implant, called Cartiva, is made of saline and a bio-compatible polymer that is similar in consistency to a contact lens and is the size and shape of a No. 2 pencil eraser.  The surgical procedure takes about 30 minutes to complete. The implant is inserted through a tiny incision between the bones metatarsophalangeal or MTP joint, where the natural cartilage has worn away.

Dr. Yakavonis named a few benefits for patients over conventional treatments. For instance, unlike the metal materials used in traditional MTP joint replacement, this implant is different. The implant is tolerated by the body’s immune system. This will reduce the risk of inflammation or rejection.  And it’s unlike fusion surgery, which fuses the two bones in the big toe together to eliminate the painful bone-on-bone rubbing. This product is flexible and allows for the return of full range of motion in the joint.

Recovery from the implant surgery is relatively easy, when compared to other foot surgical procedures.  Following the ambulatory procedure, patients are sent home with their foot in a soft wrap.  While patients should rest with the foot on a pillow as much as possible while the toe heals, they are able to put some weight on the foot for balance when walking.  There is no need for crutches or a scooter to get around.

According to Dr. Yakavonis, this type of implant his being researched for use in larger joints such as the knee. Down the road, he said, the potential for arthritis relief for joints all over the body is limitless. It is good news for the nearly 54 million people in the United States who are suffering from some form of arthritis.

Dr. Yakavonis said neither he nor ONS has any commercial interest in this product. “It’s just an amazing option to relieve my patients from pain and I am thrilled to be able to offer it to them.”

Further, Healthy Frontiers airs on White Plains Channel 76 and Verizon Channel 45. It will air on Thursdays at 6:30 pm and Friday’s at 10:30 am.  This segment should begin broadcasting next week.

ONS Sports medicine specialists Dr. Marc Kowalsky and Dr. Katherine Vadasdi have each been guests on the program in the past, along with hand and wrist surgeon Dr. Wei, hip and knee replacement specialist Dr. Jonathan Berliner.  Watch those interviews.

Dr. Louis Bisogni is the head chiropractor for the New York Yankees and has private practices in White Plains and Somers, NY.

 

 

 

 

 

Considering Joint Replacement?

If pain in your knee, hip or shoulder joint is interfering with your quality of life, it may be time to consider joint replacement.Joint replacement surgery

Join shoulder replacement surgeon Seth Miller, MD, and hip and knee replacement surgeon Frank Ennis, MD, to learn all about the advances in joint replacement procedures and what to expect from your first office visit through the recovery process.  Dr. Miller and Dr. Ennis will be joined by Greenwich Hospital staff who will outline the particulars of your hospital stay.  There will be time to have your questions answered at the conclusion of the program.

Joint Replacement Symposium

WHEN:  Wednesday, April 5, 2017

WHERE: Greenwich Hospital Noble Auditorium

TIME: 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

SEATING IS LIMITED. Please register on line or by calling 203-863-4277.

Solutions for Hand, Wrist and Elbow Pain

Tips to manage chronic hand, wrist and elbow pain.

Chronic upper extremity pain affects as much as 20% of the population at any given time and can lead to significant disability and time away from work and activities. It can originate anywhere from the neck to the fingertips and can have a wide range of underlying causes from nerve compression and ligament injury to degenerative arthritis. Learn about common causes of hand, wrist and elbow pain, ways to lower your risk of developing it, and strategies to keep the pain under control at this informative discussion by ONS orthopedic surgeon, Matt Cantlon, MD, a specialist in upper extremity conditions. There will be time for audience questions following the presentation.  Free.  Registration required. Call 203.863.4277 or register online at greenwichhospital.org

An Arthritic Reality Check

Arthritis affects more than 52 million adults in the United States and is the most common cause of disability,” according to the CDC. The pain from arthritis can set the stage for a decline in physical activity and make it difficult to prevent chronic health problems. Unfortunately, some who suffer from this ailment stop their activity and become depressed from thoughts of the mobility they once had.

Solutions for Knee Pain ArticleJane E. Brody, author of the “Keep  Moving to Stay a Step Ahead of Arthritis” article in The New York Times recently attempted to relate to those suffering from arthritis by speaking of her own battle with having to put down the tennis racket after decades of enjoying the sport, and her story did not end there. Two years after that, she had joint replacement surgery, picked up an assortment of other activities that successfully replaced tennis as a main source of activity. Therefore, encouraging others to do the same and not succumb to the depression that can sometimes come in hand with arthritis.

The reality is that the majority of people dealing with arthritis do not fully understand what they are capable of. Less than 10% of participants with arthritic knees in a 10-year study met the national guidelines of doing two and a half hours of moderate physical activity a week. Yes, you read that correctly, a week! It gets better though. Participants did notice a significant improvement of function when the amount of activity per week was increased. Additional weight on the body creates unnecessary stress on the major joints as well, leaving a 10% decrease in weight able to make a noticeable difference. With this fact a recommendation of starter exercises were mentioned, including walking laps in a swimming pool and then increasing activity as the muscles gain strength.

For more insightful tips, come to Dr. Delos’ talk about “Solutions for Knee Pain in Active Patients with Arthritis” tonight! The program is free and open to the public! Registration Requested. Aside from the talk, please consult your physician if this article has hit home and/or your quality of life is not what it once was; ONS provides excellent service and care for those in need, proudly keeping up-to-date with developments in the field.

Solutions for Knee Pain in Active Patients with Arthritis

Delos Office VerticalSOLUTIONS FOR KNEE PAIN
in Active Patients with Arthritis

WHEN: Thursday May 7, 6:00 p.m.
WHERE: Greenwich Hospital Noble Conference Center
SPEAKER: Demetris Delos, MD

Are you suffering from knee arthritis pain? Middle-aged and older adults are staying more active than ever but some are unable due to pain and debilitation of knee arthritis. Demetros Delos, MD of ONS and Greenwich Hospital will discuss non-operative and operative treatments for knee arthritis for those who wish to remain active in sports and physical activities, without resorting to a total knee replacement.

You will have the opportunity to ask questions at the conclusion of the talk.  The program is free and open to the public. Registration Requested. Call (203) 863-4277 or register online at www.greenhosp.org.

Arthritis Treatment for Active People Seminar on October 5

On October 5, from 6-7:30 p.m., the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education will present a free lecture on the treatment and management of arthritis in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital at 5 Perryridge Road as part of the Foundation’s education initiative. More than 70 percent of adults over age 55 have some form of arthritis, the degenerative condition characterized by a gradual wearing away of the joint cartilage. Vast improvements have been made in non-surgical and surgical treatments as more and more people seek solutions for pain relief to maintain an active lifestyle. Board-certified orthopedic surgeon Steven Hindman, MD of ONS will discuss arthritis, the causes of joint and bone pain, the signs and symptoms of various forms of arthritis, and non-surgical and surgical treatment options. The seminar is free.

To register for free Arthritis Treatment for Active People Seminar, call 203-863-4277 or 888-305-9253.

ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education, Inc. is a registered not-for-profit, 501(c)3 organization devoted to understanding the causes and optimal treatments of orthopedic injuries and musculoskeletal conditions. The ONS Foundation, in alliance with Greenwich Hospital, strives to improve standards of excellence for the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders through clinical research, physician and patient education, and community outreach programs.