Anterior Hip Replacement

IS ANTERIOR HIP REPLACEMENT RIGHT FOR YOU? anterior hip joint replacement

Anterior hip replacement offers many advantages over traditional hip replacement procedures; however, it is not for everyone and, as with any surgery, has its own risks.

ADVANTAGES OF ANTERIOR HIP REPLACEMENT 

In traditional hip replacement procedures, surgeons replace the damaged hip cartilage and bone with a prosthesis through an incision in the back (posterior) or the side (lateral) of the hip. In both of these procedures, surrounding muscles need to be cut or detached from the bone to provide access to the joint and then repaired at the end of the procedure.  The front of the hip has fewer and smaller muscles, enabling surgeons to work between them.  Therefore, patients typically experience less post-surgical pain and don’t require as much pain medication.

Since anterior hip replacement surgery does not disrupt the surrounding muscles or soft tissues, the risk of hip dislocation, a major concern with hip joint replacement, is greatly reduced.  Patients can bend at the waist and sit with their legs crossed as soon as it is comfortable; traditional hip replacement patients must avoid those activities for 6 – 8 weeks or longer because of the risk of dislocation.

Patients who have undergone anterior hip replacement are often able to go home the day of the procedure because they tend to recover more quickly than with the other approaches. Patients are typically walking with crutches or a walker and are able to bend at the waist within a day. Patients are also able to walk unassisted a week or more earlier than patients who’ve had one of the traditional procedures.

LIMITS AND RISKS OF ANTERIOR HIP REPLACEMENT 

Any successful hip replacement surgery depends on many factors beyond surgical approach. This can include the surgeon’s training and skill, the patient’s overall health and fitness, and the patient’s level of commitment to post-surgical rehabilitation. In general, people who are obese or extremely muscular are not good candidates for anterior hip replacement. This is because the excess soft tissue decreases the space in the front of the hip.

The anterior hip replacement procedure requires a high level of training and precision because surgeons are working with a restricted view of the hip joint.    With the anterior approach, the surgical area is near the lateral cutaneous femoral nerve, which extends from the front of the pelvis to provide sensation to the outer thigh. If the nerve is affected during surgery, the thigh could become numb and, in rare cases, (less than 1 %) develop a painful skin condition. Not every hip replacement surgeon has undergone the highly technical training to safely to perform the anterior procedure, so it is important investigate the qualifications of your surgeon.

Individuals considering hip replacement surgery should consult with a hip replacement specialist to understand which approach is best suited for his or her personal circumstances and lifestyle goals.

Watch a video demonstration of the procedure.

Schedule an appointment with a hip joint replacement specialist or call (203) 869-1145

 

Reviewed 2019

Synthetic Cartilage Implants

NEW PRODUCT APPROVED FOR SURGERY HOLDS PROMISE FOR ARTHRITIS SUFFERERS. 

ONS orthopedic foot and ankle surgeon, Dr. Mark Yakavonis, was a guest today on Healthy Frontiersa White Plains community television program hosted by Dr. Louis Bisogni.  Dr. Yakavonis discussed a significant new development in the treatment of big toe arthritis that has the future potential to alleviate arthritis pain in larger joints in the body. Dr. Yakavonis and Michael Clain, MD, also of ONS, are among the few orthopedic foot and ankle surgeons in the country who offer this option to their patients.

The new synthetic cartilage implant was approved as a treatment for painful arthritis in the joint of the big toe in July, 2016, but  Dr. Yakavonis explained that it has been a highly effective treatment in Canada, Europe and Brazil since 2002.  The implant, called Cartiva, is made of saline and a bio-compatible polymer that is similar in consistency to a contact lens and is the size and shape of a No. 2 pencil eraser.  The surgical procedure takes about 30 minutes to complete. The implant is inserted through a tiny incision between the bones metatarsophalangeal or MTP joint, where the natural cartilage has worn away.

Dr. Yakavonis named a few benefits for patients over conventional treatments. For instance, unlike the metal materials used in traditional MTP joint replacement, this implant is different. The implant is tolerated by the body’s immune system. This will reduce the risk of inflammation or rejection.  And it’s unlike fusion surgery, which fuses the two bones in the big toe together to eliminate the painful bone-on-bone rubbing. This product is flexible and allows for the return of full range of motion in the joint.

Recovery from the implant surgery is relatively easy, when compared to other foot surgical procedures.  Following the ambulatory procedure, patients are sent home with their foot in a soft wrap.  While patients should rest with the foot on a pillow as much as possible while the toe heals, they are able to put some weight on the foot for balance when walking.  There is no need for crutches or a scooter to get around.

According to Dr. Yakavonis, this type of implant his being researched for use in larger joints such as the knee. Down the road, he said, the potential for arthritis relief for joints all over the body is limitless. It is good news for the nearly 54 million people in the United States who are suffering from some form of arthritis.

Dr. Yakavonis said neither he nor ONS has any commercial interest in this product. “It’s just an amazing option to relieve my patients from pain and I am thrilled to be able to offer it to them.”

Further, Healthy Frontiers airs on White Plains Channel 76 and Verizon Channel 45. It will air on Thursdays at 6:30 pm and Friday’s at 10:30 am.  This segment should begin broadcasting next week.

ONS Sports medicine specialists Dr. Marc Kowalsky and Dr. Katherine Vadasdi have each been guests on the program in the past, along with hand and wrist surgeon Dr. Wei, hip and knee replacement specialist Dr. Jonathan Berliner.  Watch those interviews.

Dr. Louis Bisogni is the head chiropractor for the New York Yankees and has private practices in White Plains and Somers, NY.