Solutions for Hand, Wrist and Elbow Pain

Tips to manage chronic hand, wrist and elbow pain.

Chronic upper extremity pain affects as much as 20% of the population at any given time and can lead to significant disability and time away from work and activities. It can originate anywhere from the neck to the fingertips and can have a wide range of underlying causes from nerve compression and ligament injury to degenerative arthritis. Learn about common causes of hand, wrist and elbow pain, ways to lower your risk of developing it, and strategies to keep the pain under control at this informative discussion by ONS orthopedic surgeon, Matt Cantlon, MD, a specialist in upper extremity conditions. There will be time for audience questions following the presentation.  Free.  Registration required. Call 203.863.4277 or register online at greenwichhospital.org

The Dangers of Sports Specialization

Every young athlete dreams of the pride and exhilaration of hitting the game winning home run, or scoring the goal that clinches the championship.  In today’s competitive sports environment, youth are under more pressure than ever to train harder and longer to excel in their sport, often with debilitating consequences, writes sports medicine specialist and orthopedic surgeon, Demetris Delos, MD in the latest issue of The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital.Sports Medicine Discussion

The greatest shift in youth sports in the last generation has been the trend toward sports specialization and year-round training. Twenty years ago, young athletes typically played a particular sport only during that sport’s season (i.e. football in the fall, baseball in the spring and summer), and most kids sat out a season or a summer.  Today’s young competitors don’t seem to enjoy that luxury.  Unfortunately, this has also led to a surge of sport specific injuries.

A recent study at the Departments of Kinesiology, Orthopedics and Rehabilitation at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, for instance, found that high school athletes who trained in one sport for more than 8 months were more likely to report a history of overuse knee and hip injuries, than those who had played a variety of sports throughout the year or played sports at less intense levels.

The results of this study reflect what orthopedists have noticed in the last decade with the increasing number of kids showing up in our offices with throwing injuries, torn knee cartilage and stress fractures.

Professional level injuries

 The growing corps of young adolescents and pre-adolescent baseball pitchers is now throwing excessive numbers of pitches during an unusually high number of innings for immature arm muscles. This has led to an epidemic of young athletes suffering ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injuries, requiring the so-called Tommy John Surgery. Tommy John was a left handed pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 1970’s, who was the first baseball player to undergo UCL reconstruction surgery.  His successful recovery and return to achieve a record of 288 career victories.

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears in youth athletes are also increasing at an alarming rate. While ACL tears are not so closely related to a particular sport statistic the way  UCL injuries are tied to pitch count, clearly the rapid rise of sports that involve running and sudden pivoting – think soccer, lacrosse, football, basketball and rugby – increases the likelihood of season ending ACL tears and reconstructive surgery.

Overuse injuries

Unlike ACL injuries, which can be dramatic on-field experiences with players being helped off the field, the vast majority of injuries associated with excessive specialization and training are overuse injuries. Overuse injuries develop slowly over time, starting perhaps as a mild twinge before progressing into relentless, often debilitating pain.  Ironically, these injuries are relatively easy to treat with a period rest and activity modification.  All too often, players, their coaches and, sadly, parents, are often reluctant to have the athlete sit out a few practices and games.  Left untreated, overuse injuries can lead to tears in the muscles and tendons of the affected area, which require a lengthier rehabilitation and sometimes surgery.

Overuse injuries are typically sport specific. In baseball, the upper extremity is most often affected.  With Little league shoulder, the growth place of the humerus (arm bone) becomes inflamed by the repetitive motion of throwing with excessive force.  Similarly, Little league elbow involves injury to the growth plate along the inner portion of the elbow.

In the lower extremity, overuse injuries of the knee and ankle are very common. Osgood Schlatter and Jumper’s knee are injuries to the growth plate of the knee that can be a frustrating source of pain. These injuries are typically associated with repetitive impact activities (running, jumping, etc.) as seen in basketball, soccer and track.  In the ankle, Sever’s disease can lead to pain in the back of the heel.

How can we prevent injuries?

The solution is simple but that doesn’t mean it is easy. Rest and activity modification can be difficult to execute in the middle of the season when the athlete is invested in playing and when parents have already invested much time and money to the sport.

Nevertheless, it is incumbent upon parents to insist their child rest to give the body the opportunity to heal before more serious injury occurs. If a week or two of rest doesn’t resolve the condition, the young athlete should be evaluated by an orthopedist or sports medicine specialist.

Repetitive activities such as throwing or running can lead to changes in the development of growing bones and joints. It has been known for some time now that significant amounts of pitching during adolescence can change the rotation and shape of the shoulder.

Moreover, there is a growing body of evidence indicating certain sports played excessively during adolescence are associated with the development of femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (hip impingement), which can lead to hip problems often requiring surgery in adulthood.

In addition, numerous studies have shown that exposure in youth to a range of different sports that utilize different muscle groups and mechanical skills lead to the greater overall athleticism and better athletes.

Tips to Prevent Injuries from Running

Prevent Running Injuries
Proper fitting running shoes can help prevent injury

Do you have pain when you go running?

There can be many causes for the aches and pains associated with running, but sometimes it is as simple as wearing the wrong running shoe. Improperly fitting sport shoes can lead to a variety of painful foot, ankle, knee and hip conditions, according the ONS Sports Medicine specialist Katherine B. Vadasdi, MD.

“The best running shoe is one that keeps the foot in a neutral position, so it’s important to know if your feet are neutral when you stand or run, or if they are pronated (roll to the inner side of the foot) or supinated (roll to the outside of the foot),” said Dr. Vadasdi.  In general, people whose feet have low arches tend to pronate, while people with high arches tend to supinate. Today there are dozens models of sports shoes that are specifically designed to support each of these conditions, knowing your foot’s anatomy will help you make the right decision.

The other thing you have to consider is the type of running that you do, which determines the level of cushioning and stability you will need. For instance, trail runners need a shoe that offers more stability for the rugged terrain, while a marathon runner may need a training shoe with more cushion. An athlete training for shorter distances may use a track shoe or racing flat.knee and

Past injuries should also be taken into consideration when making your selection. If you’ve had plantar fasciitis, for instance, an over-the-counter insert may help put your foot in a more neutral position. If you’ve had hamstring tendinitis or tightness in your calves, you should opt for a greater heel to toe incline – called an offset.

When you get a new pair of running shoes, gradually introduce them into your routine, using them only two times in the first week or two alternating with your previous pair, and then gradually increase the numbers of days that you run in them. It can be difficult to determine if your running shoes are at the root of your pain, but in general, if you develop a new pain or discomfort shortly after switching running shoes, stop using them until the pain is resolved. Consult a physician if the pain persists for more than a week.

Youth Rugby Safety Talk

ONS Sports Medicine Specialist Marc S. Kowalsky, MD, to speak about Youth Rugby Safety on May 4

Dr. Marc Kowalsky will discuss safe participation in youth rugby, the fastest growing sport among young athletes in the United StKowalskyMD_WorldRugbyPacificNationsCupates.

The informative lecture for coaches, players and parents of players presented by the Rye Rugby Club will take place on Wednesday, May 4 beginning at 7 pm at the Rye High School Performing Arts Center at One Parsons Street in Rye New York.

Dr. Kowalsky will draw from his extensive experience caring for rugby players at every level of competition in this discussion of strategies for injury prevention. Topics will include optimal diet and nutrition, as well as strength and conditioning in these athletes.  Dr. Kowalsky will also touch on the value of protective equipment in youth rugby. The critical role of coaching and officiating in maintaining safety of the game will be covered, as will prevention and management of concussion. The importance of collaboration among parents, coaches, trainers, and physicians will be addressed as well.

A former rugby player, Dr. Kowalsky serves as team physician for the USA Rugby National Team, the White Plains Rugby Football Club, Iona College Rugby Football Club, and the CT State Champion Greenwich High School Rugby Team.

The Importance of Injury Prevention: Don’t Become a Statistic

Quality of life, activity and productivity are affected by painful orthopedic conditions.

One in two Americans over the age of 18 and nearly three out of four age 65 and older have a musculoskeletal condition costing an estimated $213 billion each year in treatment, cadolori articolari 1re and lost wages, according to a report by the United States Bone and Joint Initiative (USBJI), The Impact of Musculoskeletal Disorders on Americans: Opportunities for Action.

The study finds that the quality of life, activity and productivity of an estimated 126.6 million American adults are affected by painful conditions and disorders affecting the bones, joints and muscles, a number which is comparable to the total percentage of Americans living with chronic lung or heart conditions. Among children, musculoskeletal conditions are surpassed only by respiratory infections as a cause of missed school days.

The report states that arthritis and related conditions top the list of orthopedic ailments (51.8 million adults) followed by back and neck pain (75.7 million combined). With an aging population, the number of people faced with musculoskeletal discomfort can be expected to greatly increase.

Fortunately, advances in diagnostic and treatment technologies, such as those that are available from the sub-specialists at ONS, can provide patients with pain relief and a safe return to mobility. However, the report underscores the importance of injury prevention strategies for individuals of all ages and the need for prompt treatment when injuries occur and orthopedic conditions first appear. With top orthopedists, neurosurgeons, physical therapists and physiatrists, ONS is committed to finding non-surgical options as the first line of treatment. Only 10 percent of ONS patients require surgery.

Fall Prevention

Did you know that most traumatic head injuries are the result of falling? ONS surgeon and trauma specialist Steven Hindman, MD, will discuss risks that can lead to falls and injury and the best way to avoid them. HindmanWhite

Dr. Steven Hindman to discuss Fall and Injury Prevention, Thursday, February 25

Did you know that falls are the most common cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI)?HindmanWhite

From 2006–2010, falls were the leading cause of TBI, accounting for 40% of all brain injuries in the United States that resulted in an ED visit, hospitalization, or death, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Elderly adults and young children are the most likely to suffer falling accidents.

Falling out of bed or from a ladder, slipping in the bath or down a flight of stairs, and almost any other fall can result in a severe blow to the head that damages brain cells, blood vessels and protective tissue around the brain. Bleeding in the brain, swelling and blood clots can interfere with the oxygen supply to the brain, which can cause widespread damage.

You can learn how to prevent falls and protect yourself or your loved one by joining Dr. Steven Hindman on Thursday, January 25 at 6:30 pm when he discusses fall prevention strategies at Sunrise Senior Living, 251 Turn of River Road in Stamford. Refreshments will be served.

 

Tips to Prevent Back Injury from Shoveling Snow

If the local forecasts are to be believed, many of us will be doing a fair amount of snow shoveling this weekend. Before you bundle up and head out, though, Dr. Jeffery Heftler, an interventional pain Blog-shoveling show 300 pxspecialist at Orthopedic and Neurosurgery Specialists (ONS) in Greenwich and Stamford, has a few words of advice to protect your back from strain and injury.

“The most important thing is to stay ahead of the accumulation of snow. It’s much easier on your back to shovel after every few inches has fallen than to wait and lift heavier loads of snow for a longer period of time,” he advises. Waiting can make the task even harder if the snow melts and then freezes over. Dr. Heftler also recommends investing in so called “push shovels” that are specially designed for pushing the snow aside while shovels with bent handles can help ease the tension on back and shoulders.

Without a doubt, Dr. Heftler sees more patients with back pain following a large snow storm. One reason, he suggests, is that people tend to think of shoveling snow as a nuisance and chore, when in fact it is an intense and strenuous exercise. “All too often, people who are generally inactive underestimate the physical challenge involved in clearing snow. Even someone in good shape can strain their back from the rotation of lifting the snow and throwing it over their shoulder,”   he says.

To protect your back, it’s best to take a few moments to warm up your muscles before going out in the cold. When shoveling, maintain the correct posture and technique to minimize the pressure on your weaker back muscles. Avoid rounding your lower back, for instance. Instead, go through the motions with a straight back leaning forward and your knees slightly bent. Use your core, hips and hamstrings to provide strength and stability instead of relying on your back and shoulder muscles to do the heavy lifting.

People with pre-existing back conditions are most vulnerable to shoveling related injuries and should avoid the activity altogether. “Even if you have to hire someone to clear the snow for you, it will pay for itself in terms of avoiding pain and days lost from work and winter sports,” Heftler says.

If you do experience pain while shoveling, Dr. Heftler says to stop, go inside and rest in a comfortable position until the discomfort passes. He recommends anti-inflammatory medications such as Advil or Aleve, and using ice or heat directly on the area where the pain is most acute. If the pain is severe and persists through the next day, consult with a physician.

Tips to Avoid Hidden Holiday Hazards

The holidays are great times for family members from near and far to get together to celebrate, but nothing ruins the fun faster than a mishap or injury thEmergency Signat lands someone in the emergency room.

According to orthopedic surgeon, Steven Hindman, MD, of Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists (ONS) in Greenwich and Stamford, a few simple precautions can help you and your loved ones avoid that fate and keep your holidays full of good cheer. Dr. Hindman said that while the hazards of choking on food, house fires from candles, and faulty strings of decorative lights are well-known, other, less publicized dangers can threaten the joy of the season as well.

Take Care When Climbing: When preparing for the holidays, take particular care about what you are climbing on to decorate or retrieve a special serving bowl from a high shelf. Tall ladders with handles and step ladders are a safer bet when objects are beyond your reach than a kitchen counter, a swivel chair, or a wobbly old ladder you pull out of the garage once a year, for instance. “I have seen horrible injuries from people climbing on unsafe things during the holidays,” said Dr. Hindman.

Keep Your Home Clear and Bright: Houseguests may be unaccustomed to having pets, children and their toys underfoot leading them to easily trip over the dog and break a wrist or twist an ankle stepping on a toy. Older family members are particularly vulnerable to falls if they get up during the night in unlit, unfamiliar hallways, Dr. Hindman warned. One wrong step could send them tumbling down the stairs, or crashing into a table or door jamb. Change of routine and medication schedules could further disorient elderly guests, who might experience dizziness and fluctuations in their blood pressure.

Steady as You Go: Distractions and alcoholic beverages can also pose perils. In the kitchen, divided and unfocussed attention can lead to hand injuries, burns and severe lacerations. Dr. Hindman noted, “More people are cooking and some people who don’t normally cook are preparing holiday meals, so we see an increase in the number of cut tendons and nerves in the hand.”

Reckless Youth: Young people home from college can become impetuous with the excitement of reuniting with old friends. Playing contact sports without the proper equipment, late night partying, and careless driving are common causes of holiday youth visits to the emergency room, Dr. Hindman warned.

The holidays are a time to be thankful for friends and family. Taking the proper precautions to make sure everyone stays safe during this time of year can be the greatest gift of all.

 

 

Will Your Knees Be Ready to Ski? Tips from ONS to Avoid Injury

Although the forecasts are not yet predicting snow, skiers and snowboarders would be wise to take up a targeted conditioning program now to avoid the aches and injuries that often plague them on KatherineVadasdiMD300x398the slopes. Winter activities tend to tax muscles and muscle groups that are used very little during the rest of the year. As a result, even the best athletes can suffer when taking on the extreme stresses of downhill sports.

Orthopedic surgeon Steven Hindman, MD of Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialsts (ONS) in Greenwich and Stamford, CT, suggests that preseason conditioning exercises can help avert pain and the most feared knee injury of all – a season-ending tear to the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) .

“Ideally, people should start a conditioning program two to three months before they get near the mountain,” said Dr. Hindman. “But it’s never to late to benefit from a preventive exercise routine.” Too often, he noted, people go from their car to the ski lift without a single stretch. Such lack of preparation greatly increases the risk of injury.

One of four ligaments that provide stability to the knee, the ACL can tear when there is a sudden strain, abrupt change of direction, or twisting of the knee joint while the feet remain in a single direction. Skiers are at greatest risk to strain the ACL to the point of tearing when they try to recover from a fall with their body weight in back of the skis, if they don’t land a jump correctly, or if improperly set ski bindings don’t release during a a critical moment. ACL tears usually require surgery and a lengthy recuperation to repair.

Since the major leg muscles work the hardest when skiing and snowboarding, exercises should focus on strengthening thighs, hamstrings, calves and hips. Workouts that incorporate these muscle groups will help maintain good balance, stabilize the knee during stress situations and build endurance for a full day on the mountain. Adding practices such as yoga and Pilates will also develop strength and balance while improving the body’s flexibility and core fitness.

As important as conditioning is off the slopes, knowing your body’s limit is key on the slopes. Studies show that the majority of injuries happen at the end of the day with the combination of fatigue, flat light, and deteriorating snow conditions. “When you get tired, stop,” said Dr. Hindman.

 

“Maximizing Your Child’s Athletic Potential” Success

Delos_Houston_
Dr. Delos with Allan Houston

Last Thursday’s talk on “Maximizing Your Child’s Athletic Potential” was a success. A big thank you goes out to the Junior League of Greenwich for making it possible with their focus on improving the community and empowering others to further health and education! Ultimately they brought together the perfect combination of experts to inform the public about the youth and the sports they love.

Dr. Delos, of ONS and Greenwich Hospital, was a panel speaker at this event. He specializes in sports medicine and arthroscopic treatment of knee and shoulder disorders. Before ONS, Dr. Delos was the Assistant NFL Team Physician for the New York Giants and was team physician for a number of local high school and college athletes.

Other panel members consisted of Andy Barr, Director of Performance and Rehab for the New York Knicks, Mubarak “Bar” Malik, Head of Strength and Conditioning for the New York Knicks, and Allan Houston, one of NBA’s all-time greatest long range shooters and Olympic gold medalist, as the moderator. Each participant reinforced the importance of parents taking interest in the development of their young athlete and properly guiding them to the path of success. Parents attending this event were very attentive, and came prepared with questions.

Conversations covered the fundamental topics, like proper sleep habits and nutrition. For example, a young athlete’s nutrition should increase in relation to the amount of activity they experience daily. This may be common knowledge to an adult but for an adolescent, proper amounts of sleep and good nutrition that balances the amount of activity should be added to their routine.

Aside from the basic topics of discussion, there was a myth to be busted as well; to find out the details of the myth and for more information about the questions that were asked at the event, please read the article written by the Greenwich Freepress.

Delos_Group_2
Photography credit goes to the Delos family, thank you!

Overuse Injuries: Recovery Time (Part II)

Elbow_Pain_WebRemember last week’s post? Dr.Cohen’s knowledge of “overuse injuries” does not stop at what causes the condition; she has valuable insight on the treatment and prevention as well.

The Mystery is in the History
Careful history taking and examination helps the sports medicine physician diagnose the condition. It is helpful to know what maneuver produces the pain; or when the pain occurs. Many times with an overuse the injury the symptoms will first occur after the activity; then earlier and earlier into the activity until you become symptomatic at rest. It is important to seek medical attention long before that occurs. It is not normal to have pain with the activity. It is important to consult a physician regarding your symptoms, and to find the cause of the injury so that re-injury does not occur once the present injury is treated.

What are the treatment principles for Overuse Injuries?
Management of the condition depends on the severity. Relative rest, which is stopping the aggravating activity while maintaining cardiovascular activity with another activity is one aspect of the treatment program. For example, use of a stationary bicycle or elliptical, or swimming, which are nonimpact activities, might be an alternate activity for a runner while the injury is healing. One needs to individualize the modified activity for the patient and their injury. Other aspects of the treatment plan are pain management with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication as indicated if no contraindication; physical therapy to include instruction in stretching and strengthening exercises; use of an appropriate brace or support for the injured body part; correction of predisposing factors; and modification of biomechanics.

Are there some injury prevention guidelines?
We would all like to prevent an injury from occurring and to maximize our athletic endeavors. Some key points to remember to help get you there are: appropriate training and conditioning for the sport; check your biomechanics for the sport; allow for adequate recovery and do not engage in your sport when you are tired or in pain. Engage in a variety of sports and activities so that you are not always using the same muscles in the same way. Many elite level athletes complement their specialized sport training with another sport. For example, a cyclist might skate or play hockey in the off season to maintain muscle balance of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles of the thigh. It is best to be proactive and prevent the injury from happening.

Dr.Cohen will be discussing Stress Fractures and Biomechanical assessment in future blogs.

Overuse Injuries: Cause and Effect (Part I)

Cohen headshot for letterGloria Cohen, MD is a specialist in non-operative sports medicine who believes in taking an integrative approach to medical management by considering a patients’ bio-mechanics, cardio-vascular and pulmonary function as it relates to athletic performance. Aside from her impressive medical career, Dr. Cohen is a successful competitive runner who has qualified twice for the New York Marathon and is also an off-road and road cyclist. Her academic insights are a combination of both research and real-world experience, the following article is her most recent commentary on the topic of “overuse injuries”:

What is an “overuse injury”?
An “overuse injury” is an injury that results when excessive stress is applied over a period of time to bones, muscles, tendons, and other supporting soft tissue structures of a particular body part.  This differs from an acute injury which happens quickly and is traumatic in nature. Too much stress to a body part will cause the tissues to break down faster than healing can occur, thereby resulting in an injury. A good analogy would be to consider what happens to a credit card or a piece of metal when you bend it back and forth repetitively – first you see the stress reaction, and then with continued stress the item breaks in two.  As you can appreciate, we want to avoid the latter situation when it comes to the body.

What are some common examples of “overuse injuries”?
Every body part can be affected by an overuse injury.  Some common examples you might be familiar with are: rotator cuff injuries of the shoulder; epicondylitis or tennis elbow; patellofemoral pain syndrome of the knee; and tibial stress syndrome or “shin splints” for the lower leg.  Here are a few case examples of classic overuse syndromes:

Jogging injury.

  1. A 40 year old male has recently increased the intensity and frequency of his swimming activity over the summer months. He now complains of pain in the front of his shoulder with overhead and rotation motion. Diagnosis: Rotator cuff tendinitis
  2. A 30 year old female has been playing tennis daily, now competing in matches at a more difficult level. She complains of increasing soreness in the outside aspect of her elbow. She had tried to play through the pain, but had to stop. She says that she can barely lift a coffee cup now because of the elbow pain. Diagnosis: Tennis Elbow /Lateral epicondylitis
  3. A 20 year college student takes up running during her summer break from school. When she returns to school, she decides to train for a half marathon. As she increases her mileage, and adds speed work to her training program, she develops pain in the inside aspect of one shin. She now complains of pain with just walking. Diagnosis: Shin splints/Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome

What are some of the specific causes of these “overuse injuries”?
As a primary care sports medicine physician I recognize that there are sport specific issues which may contribute to the resulting injury; but there are common “intrinsic” and “extrinsic” factors which play a major role in the development of these types of injuries. “Intrinsic” factors refer to the elements that we cannot control but that we can modify.  These include biomechanical alignment, such as knock knees, bowl legs, flat feet or high arched feet; leg length difference; muscle imbalance; muscle weakness; and lack of flexibility.  These factors can be modified to maximize the individual’s performance, and thereby treat or prevent injury.  An example would be a conditioning program and sport specific training. The “extrinsic factors” include training errors, such as doing “too much too soon”; training surfaces – running on too hard a surface, or playing on an uneven surface; shoes – it is important to wear the appropriate type of shoe for your foot mechanics and the sport; equipment; and environmental conditions. Paying attention to the “extrinsic factors” will help you modify the “intrinsic” ones.

… to be continued in the next segment, Overuse Injuries: Recovery (Part II)

ONS Physiatrist, Christopher Sahler, MD on post New York City Marathon Tips for Runners

Christopher Sahler, MD
Christopher Sahler, MD

Christopher S. Sahler, MD of ONS is an interventional physiatrists specializing in sports medicine. His focus is non-operative treatment of musculoskeletal injuries, restoring proper function, reducing pain and promoting active lifestyles.

“Each year 50,000 people participate in the NYC marathon. If you are in that group and completed the race this past weekend, congratulations! It is an exciting accomplishment that you will remember for the rest of your life.

Now that the race is over, there are a few key points to remember that will help to maximize your recovery and minimize pain. Many athletes experience worsening soreness over the following days after the race. This is known as delayed onset muscle soreness and typically is most painful 48-72 hours later. After the race, your body is in a depleted state so it is important to take in plenty of water and healthy food. A combination of complex carbohydrates and protein help the muscles to repair themselves and re-build their energy stores. It is also recommended that you perform light, short duration activities such as walking, gentle jogging, biking, swimming etc. This helps to increase blood flow to the muscles and tissues that need the nutrients the most and helps to wash away the built up metabolic byproducts such as lactic acid. Gentle stretching and soaking in a warm bath may also help loosen up the muscles. Depending on your previous activity level, it is important to give your body time off before re-starting any intense exercise routines. Most runners should take at least one month off.

Congratulations again on the race!”

Dr. Sahler will present “Exercise as Treatment for Chronic Pain.” Learn how exercise can be used as a safe and effective treatment for chronic pain conditions. This free health seminar will be in the Noble Conference room at Greenwich Hospital Tuesday, December 2 at 6:00 p.m.  To register call 203-863-4277 or register online at https://www.greenhosp.org/CREG/ClassDetails.aspx?sid=1&ClassID=5348

 

Orthopaedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist Dr. Demetris Delos on NY Giants Victor Cruz’s Injury

Dr. Delos served as Assistant NFL Team Physician for the New York Football Giants and

Demetris Delos, MD
Demetris Delos, MD

team physician for local high school and college athletes. His practice is focused on sports medicine and arthroscopic treatment of knee and shoulder disorders including knee preservation surgery, shoulder instability and rotator cuff repair. Upon hearing about the NY Giants’ Wide Receiver Victor Cruz’s knee injury, we reached out to Dr. Delos to give us insight on Victor’s type of injury. Dr. Delos said:

“Victor Cruz sustained a devastating injury to his knee last night, an injury that will cost him the rest of the season. While attempting to catch a ball in the end zone, he tore the patellar tendon in his right knee. The patellar tendon is a structure that attaches the kneecap (patella) to the shinbone (tibia). When the patellar tendon is torn, the player cannot straighten (extend) his knee and obviously cannot perform at the high level expected in the NFL.

Patellar tendon ruptures are relatively uncommon injuries that occur in otherwise healthy players without any predisposing factors. The mechanism of injury is typically eccentric overload (forcibly bending the knee while the quadricep is firing).

Studies of NFL players with this injury report that the vast majority are able to return to NFL level play after surgery and extensive rehabilitation. Let’s wish Victor a speedy recovery so we can watch him salsa in the end zone again!”

For more information on knee injuries, visit Our Specialties page.