ONS Announces New Physical Therapy Director

ONS is pleased to announce that Robert Spatz, BSP, MPA, has joined the practice as Director of Physical Therapy, Greenwich.

Robert  joins us after serving as Facility Director for 14 years ONS Physical Therapy Directorat AON Physical Therapy in White Plains. Prior to that, he was the Physical Therapy Director at Empire Physical Therapy in Harrison and Recovery Physical Therapy in New York, NY. Early on in his career, Robert practiced as a physical therapist at Mount Sinai Sports Therapy Center in New York City and Burke Rehabilitation Hospital in White Plains. In addition, Robert is currently a Lab Instructor at Mercy College of Physical Therapy in Dobbs Ferry, NY, and an Adjunct Professor in Health and Sports for Life at Westchester Community College.  He holds an Associate Degree in Applied Science from SUNY at Westchester County, a Bachelor of Science Degree in Physical Therapy from SUNY at Stony Brook, and a Master of Public Administration Degree in Public Health from New York University.

Tips to Prevent Back Injury from Shoveling Snow

If the local forecasts are to be believed, many of us will be doing a fair amount of snow shoveling this weekend. Before you bundle up and head out, though, Dr. Jeffery Heftler, an interventional pain Blog-shoveling show 300 pxspecialist at Orthopedic and Neurosurgery Specialists (ONS) in Greenwich and Stamford, has a few words of advice to protect your back from strain and injury.

“The most important thing is to stay ahead of the accumulation of snow. It’s much easier on your back to shovel after every few inches has fallen than to wait and lift heavier loads of snow for a longer period of time,” he advises. Waiting can make the task even harder if the snow melts and then freezes over. Dr. Heftler also recommends investing in so called “push shovels” that are specially designed for pushing the snow aside while shovels with bent handles can help ease the tension on back and shoulders.

Without a doubt, Dr. Heftler sees more patients with back pain following a large snow storm. One reason, he suggests, is that people tend to think of shoveling snow as a nuisance and chore, when in fact it is an intense and strenuous exercise. “All too often, people who are generally inactive underestimate the physical challenge involved in clearing snow. Even someone in good shape can strain their back from the rotation of lifting the snow and throwing it over their shoulder,”   he says.

To protect your back, it’s best to take a few moments to warm up your muscles before going out in the cold. When shoveling, maintain the correct posture and technique to minimize the pressure on your weaker back muscles. Avoid rounding your lower back, for instance. Instead, go through the motions with a straight back leaning forward and your knees slightly bent. Use your core, hips and hamstrings to provide strength and stability instead of relying on your back and shoulder muscles to do the heavy lifting.

People with pre-existing back conditions are most vulnerable to shoveling related injuries and should avoid the activity altogether. “Even if you have to hire someone to clear the snow for you, it will pay for itself in terms of avoiding pain and days lost from work and winter sports,” Heftler says.

If you do experience pain while shoveling, Dr. Heftler says to stop, go inside and rest in a comfortable position until the discomfort passes. He recommends anti-inflammatory medications such as Advil or Aleve, and using ice or heat directly on the area where the pain is most acute. If the pain is severe and persists through the next day, consult with a physician.

STAMFORD OFFICE GRAND OPENING

ONS_GRAND_OPENING_Website

Orthopedic and Neurosurgery Specialists (ONS) in Greenwich and Stamford, CT has opened an expanded, state-of-the-art medical office and physical therapy facility in North Stamford. The new office is conveniently located off the Merritt Parkway at exit 35 at 5 High Ridge Park on the 3rd floor. Patients who choose to see a physician at the new location will find an aesthetically comfortable and healing environment that features the latest technology in imaging and electronic medical records.

A public grand opening celebration, “Your Prescription for Success: A Sports Medicine Event” will take place on June 22nd from 6 to 8 p.m. at the new office located at 5 High Ridge Park, 3rd floor in Stamford.

Come visit our brand new Orthopedic, Sports Medicine & Spine Center and Physical Therapy facility in High Ridge Park.

  • Tour the new facility and enjoy food and beverages.
  • Check out our golf, tennis and running stations to learn injury prevention tips and exercises from ONS Physical Therapists.
  • ONS physicians will talk about sports medicine related conditions and treatments.
  • Enter our drawing for exciting prizes.

To schedule an appointment at the new office in Stamford with the following physicians call, 203-869-1145.

James Cunningham, MD
Demetris Delos, MD
Tim Greene, MD
Marc Kowalsky, MD
Sean Peden, MD
Scott Simon, MD
Christopher Sahler, MD
Katie Vadasdi, MD
Mark Vitale, MD

To schedule a physical therapy appointment call, 203-869-1145, option 3.

Directions

Northbound CT-15/Merritt Pkwy:

Exit 35 (CT-137/High Ridge Rd.), go straight at the light at the end of the exit ramp then continue on Buxton Farm Rd. In .7 miles, turn left onto Turn of River Rd. and continue into High Ridge Park. Building 5 is the 2nd building on the left.

Southbound CT-15/Merritt Pkwy:

Take Exit 35 (CT-137/High Ridge Rd.), at end of the ramp, turn right onto High Ridge Road (CT-137). In .1 miles, turn left onto Buxton Farm Road. In .7 miles, turn left onto Turn of River Rd. and continue into High Ridge Park. Building 5 is the 2nd building on the left.

  • Parking is in the rear of the building
  • Patient-drop off entrance and handicap accessible parking on lower level

ONS and ONS Physical Therapy are on the 3rd floor.

 

ONS is Expanding!

Stamford announcment art.smWe are excited to announce that ONS will open an expanded, state-of-the-art office and physical therapy facility at 5 High Ridge Park in North Stamford in June. Construction began in January and is expected to be completed by the end of May.

The Stamford location will offer a team of physicians and clinical staff dedicated to that office. Some of our other surgeons from Greenwich will also maintain a schedule to see patients in Stamford on a weekly basis. In addition to the doctors’ office, the site will feature a state-of-the-art physical therapy facility outfitted with the latest equipment in an aesthetically comfortable and healing environment.

The new facility is being added in order to accommodate ONS’s growing patient population in the Stamford, New Canaan, Darien and surrounding communities. “Many of our patients come from the Stamford area. Now they can receive the excellent level of orthopedic and neurosurgical care they count on without having to drive to Greenwich,” explained Dr. Seth Miller. In house x-ray and a fully integrated electronic medical records system will make the ONS Stamford office a convenient choice for patients in that area.

ONS Success Story: William McHale

William McHale TestimonialWilliam McHale started off as many other athletes did, full of energy and feeling invincible. As we all know, that feeling of invincibility is only a feeling. In the 7th grade, young William broke his ankle playing football; fortunately he was then referred to Dr. Paul Sethi.

Dr. Sethi considers all of the athlete’s needs which helps set the stage for a successful and timely recovery period and translates into an ideal patient-doctor experience.  When McHale got older, he started as a linebacker in 30 consecutive games between his sophomore and senior years at  Yale University. During his senior year though, the labrums in both of his shoulders tore. Time was of the essence if he wanted to recover in time for his Pro Day in front of NFL Scouts. Who did he contact? None other than our very own Dr. Sethi.

The MRIs originally taken of the injury did not reveal the full extent of the damage but Dr. Sethi corrected all issues encountered during the surgery. After the procedure, William was scheduled to go to physical therapy multiple times a week and overall, it took about six to seven months for a full recovery. Since then, William has not had any other issues regarding his shoulders.

Where is William McHale now? He played to his full potential on Pro Day, was invited to Minicamp with the New Orleans Saints, and just returned from playing football in France; congratulations!

Getting Ready for the Slopes: Ski Conditioning

chalonChalon Lefebvre is the Clinical Manager and Coordinator for Education at ONS Physical Therapy. Chalon is from Vermont where she was a ski racer and continues to lecture on ski injury prevention, the following is her expert advice for the season:

Certain exercises come to mind when I think about growing up as a ski racer in Vermont. Wall sits, crunches, push-ups, lateral bounds and lots and lots of box jumps got me into shape but were they really the best exercises for ski conditioning? Not necessarily, but they were on the right track. As a physical therapist, I now understand skiing and the biomechanics that go along with the sport. I understand the appropriate exercises that help to prevent injury while conditioning people so they are ready to enjoy the season.

Skiing can be broken down into concentric (muscles shorten/lifting portion of the movement against gravity) and eccentric (lowering portion while lengthening) movements. Skiing starts at the top of the mountain, as you ski down, you perform eccentric movements the entire way, resisting gravity’s pull by controlling your body’s movements. EMG studies have shown that throughout the ski turn, the prime movers and stabilizers change at different points in the turn and therefore it is important to work your muscles in functional patterns consistent with the sport.

1) Lunges are an amazing exercise for skiers. Lunges work the quadriceps, glutes and hamstrings. Both your legs are working independently of one another in concentric and eccentric motions. To perform a good lunch, stand with both feet positioned shoulder width apart and step forward with one foot making sure to step far enough so that your knee does not extend past your toes and your shin is nearly vertical, and then step back into the start position. This exercise can progress to walking lunges or by lunging while holding dumbbells in your hands. Once you are proficient, you can make these a plyometric exercise by jumping in between each lunge.

2) Squats, whether one footed and two footed, work your quadriceps and glutes. Start with your feet shoulder width apart with your back slightly arched. Initiate the squat by sitting back and down keeping your weight through your heels. Lower yourself so that your thighs are parallel to the floor (or as low as you can) being careful not to let your knees fall in front of your toes. This exercise should be done at high repetitions for endurance.

Ski_Web_II

3) The Romanian deadlift is one of the best and most functional hamstring exercises. ACL tears often occur because people have a strength imbalance between their quadriceps and hamstrings. Stand holding a barbell or a dumbbell in each hand with your feet shoulder width apart. Maintain the lordosis in your lower back and keep a slight bend in your knees, lower the weight towards the floor until you feel a slight stretch in your hamstrings. Reverse the movement by contracting your hamstrings and glutes and push your hips forward as you return to the starting position. This exercise can also be done on one.

4) Planks and side planks work your abdominals, erector spinae, and glutes. Both of these exercises will provide you with the core strength that you need to be able to hold yourself upright while skiing. Lie on your stomach; place your hands at either side of your chest and tuck your elbows in at your sides. Keep your back flat, and push up onto your toes and elbows so that your body is off the floor. Pull your abdominals into your spine and try to maintain this position for 10 seconds to two minutes. If this is too challenging, this can also be down on your knees. A side plank is done using one arm and on one side at a time.

5) Lateral bounds work on agility and reaction time and when done consecutively will carry over to your ski turns. They can be done one footed or two footed. Create a line on the floor and jump sideways across the line, when your feet land, immediately jump back to the other side. This can be done for time as well as number of repetitions.

Although this is just a taste of what I would include in a ski conditioning program but are some of my favorite exercises for keeping my clients injury free and having fun on the mountain.

Do You Experience Foot or Ankle Pain?

Sean Peden, MD will be speaking at the Noble in Greenwich Hospital December 9th at

Sean Peden, MD
Sean Peden, MD

6:30pm to address Solutions for Foot & Ankle Pain: Beyond Foot Massage. Here is a summary of what he will present:

A painful foot or ankle condition can limit a patient’s function and quality of life with every step. Conditions from the toes to the Achilles tendon will be discussed with emphasis on surgical and nonsurgical options, including old standards and the most cutting edge new technologies. Topics covered will include foot and toe deformities such as bunions, hammertoes, flat feet, and high arches, with special attention to when and how these conditions should be treated or when they should be left alone. Plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendonitis will be discussed in detail with emphasis on the natural progression of the disease, what we know works and what is experimental. Arthritic conditions of the foot, ranging from the big toe to the ankle will be included.

A team approach is an important aspect of foot and ankle care. ONS physical therapist Alicia Hirscht, DPT, SCS, CSCS will discuss and answer questions about the role of physical therapy to improve foot and ankle pain and dysfunction.

ONS Senior Clinical Specialist Alicia Hirsch
ONS Senior Clinical Specialist Alicia Hirsch, DPT, SCS, CSCS

Dr. Peden will introduce an orthotic maker he typically works with and will discuss when and how orthotics are used, from inexpensive over-the-counter inserts to custom molded prostheses. Other options to be discussed will include stem cell technology and image-guided injections.

Dr. Peden will open up a question and answer session following the seminar. This event is free registration requested, call (203) 863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register online at:  https://www.greenhosp.org/CREG/ClassDetails.aspx?sid=1&ClassID=7253

Foot Ankle Pain Brochure

ONS Physical Therapist, Betsy Kreuter on How Even Men Can Be Diagnosed with Osteoporosis!

Betsy Kreuter, PT, CLT
ONS Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter, PT, CLT

According to The National Osteoporosis Foundation, as our population ages, even more men will be diagnosed with osteoporosis. As many as one in four men over the age of fifty are more likely to break a bone due to osteoporosis than they are to get prostate cancer. Approximately 2 million American men already have osteoporosis.  About 12 million more are at risk.  Many of the risk factors that put women at risk apply to men as well. For example family history, smoking, drinking too much alcohol, not exercising, taking steroid medicines, and having low testosterone levels are all risk factors for men. Visit the National Osteoporosis Foundation to learn more about men and osteoporosis. 
osteoporosis
There are things you can do to minimize your risk factors for osteoporosis.  Speak to your physical therapist for recommendations on exercises and instructions in proper posture and body mechanics.

To learn more about osteoporosis, bone anatomy, fracture prevention exercises to promote bone health, updates on treatments, measures to promote strong bones and personal risk factors, attend a free health seminar on October 14, 2014 at Greenwich Hospital in the Noble Conference Room.  Orthopedic surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, endocrinologist Renee Ileva, MD and physical therapist Betsy Kreuter, PT, CLT will present a free health seminar and answer questions. For more information and to register visit  https://www.greenhosp.org/CREG/ClassDetails.aspx?sid=1&ClassID=6881

ONS Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter’s P is for Posture When Sitting or During Chores!

OSTEO_graphicMost Americans spend too much time sitting and should take advantage of these tips to help keep good posture.

First, when sitting in a chair make sure your buttocks is all the way to the back of the chair. Using a lumbar roll in the small of your back will help to keep optimal alignment.

Second, if you  sit at a computer, your monitor should be at eye level, feet firmly on floor, hands and wrists in a straight line, shoulders back and elbows at 90 degrees. A break from sitting every 30 minutes will relieve your back of stresses placed on it while sitting. For a more detailed guide to improve seated posture, download Work Station Ergonomics  as a reference.

Posture is equally important when doing chores. While working, make sure your lower back is in a neutral position to avoid a forward curve in your spine. Watching your posture over the years will help avoid vertebral compression fractures due to osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis, or thinning bones, can result in painful fractures. Risk factors for osteoporosisosteoporosis include aging, being female, low body weight, low sex hormones or menopause, smoking, and some medications.

To learn more about osteoporosis, bone anatomy, fracture prevention exercises to promote bone health, updates on treatments, measures to promote strong bones and personal risk factors, register to attend a free health seminar on October 14, 2014 at Greenwich Hospital in the Noble Conference Room.  The panel of speaker include ONS Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Greenwich Hospital Endocrinologist Renee Ileva, MD and ONS Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter, PT, CLT . After the seminar you will be able to ask the doctors and therapist questions.

Train Right, Run Free! ONS Physical Therapist Alicia Hirscht Shows Us how to Train for a Marathon

The ONS Foundation’s Annual 5K Run/Walk is coming up this Sunday, September 21st in Old Greenwich! ONS supporters, staff and former patients will participate in this fun-filled event. It would be great to see you all come down and enjoy a nice morning jog. Some of you may be casual joggers, others might want to participate in the local race circuit, or you might be training for the NYC Marathon.

ONS Senior Clinical Specialist Alicia Hirsch
ONS Senior Clinical Specialist Alicia Hirsch

Whether you are a casual runner, training for the marathon, or just someone who supports local causes with a 5K run…all runners are at risk of developing injuries if they are not training properly. A question I ask all my runners in the clinic is, “What else do you do for training, besides running?” More often than not, the answer is, “nothing” or “I stretch sometimes.”  What many runners do not know is that research has shown an effective leg and core strengthening program can reduce the incidence of hip, knee and ankle pain.

A proper program needs to have exercises specific for running: weight bearing on one leg, focused on shock absorbing muscle groups, and emphasizing hip and core strength. Many runners feel that stretching in their training can help prevent injury. However, many injuries occur because of inherent muscle weakness, not necessarily because of tightness.  To address this weakness, incorporate the exercises below into your routine: 3 times per week. Good luck with your training!

 

Hamstring Curls with the Ball:

1. Lie on your back with your legs up on a ball.

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2. Lift your hips, bend your knees and roll the ball in towards your buttocks.

IMG_3240

3. Roll the ball back out and lower your hips.

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One Legged Bridges:

1. Lie on your back with one knee bent, the other straight in the air.

IMG_3241

2. Pushing through the bent knee, lift your hips off the ground. Lower back down.

IMG_3242

Repeat: 3 sets of 15 reps on each leg.

 

 

 

 

 


Sideplanks:

1. Lie on your side, heels in line with your shoulders.

IMG_3243

2. Supporting yourself on your elbow, lift your body off the ground. Lower back down, repeat:

 

IMG_3244

3. Lower back down, repeat:

 

 

 

Hip Dips:

 1. Stand on your left leg only.

IMG_3246

 

2. Let your trunk bend forward while extending your right leg straight back. Let your arms fall freely, keep your left knee slightly bent. Keep your stomach muscles tight and your back in neutral, bend through your hip.

IMG_3249

 

3. Return to start position, repeat: 2 sets of 15 reps on each leg.

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One Legged Heel Raises:

1. Stand off the edge of a step, letting your heel hang below the step.

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2. Push up onto your toes. Lower back down slowly.

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Repeat: 3 sets of 15 reps on each leg.


Lateral Squats:

1. Stand sideways on a step.

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2. Sit your hips back and bend your knee, lowering your opposite leg to the ground. Do not let your knee fall inward and do not let it bend past your toes.

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3. Lift back up and repeat: 2 sets of 15 reps


Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists PC (ONS)
is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice in Greenwich, CT. ONS physicians provide expertise in sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopaedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, please visit www.onsmd.com.

ONS Physical Therapist, Alicia Hirscht Gives Tips on Traveling With Joint Pain

This is a popular time of year for people to go on vacation and spend long hours travelling.   Several of my patients have asked me how to avoid exacerbating their various aches and pains while flying or driving.  By following these guidelines it could mean the difference between arriving at your destination with a smile on your face, or arriving with a desperate look of “where’s my bed!”

Alicia Hirscht, DPT, SCS, CSCS, Senior Clinical Specialist
Alicia Hirscht, DPT, SCS, CSCS, Senior Clinical Specialist
  1. KEEP MOVING! Our bodies are built to move, we are not built to stay in one position for long periods of time, even if it is sitting. Whether in a car or on a plane, try performing these exercises:
    1. Ankle pumps: Move your feet up and down in a pumping motion, repeat 30 times every half hour. This gets the circulation going in your legs and can minimize edema associated with travelling.
    2. Glute sets: Sit up tall and squeeze your buttocks muscles together, repeat 30 times every half hour. This helps take the pressure off your tail bone from sitting too long.
    3. Shoulder blade pinches: Sit up straight and squeeze your shoulder blades together, repeat 30 times every half hour. This gets you out of the slumped posture associated with driving or reading on a plane.
    4. Chin tucks: Sit up tall and look straight ahead. Pull your chin in towards your spine, giving yourself a “double” chin, 10 times every half hour. This resets your spine and stretches the muscles at the back of your skull.
  1. Maintain proper sitting position with lumbar support. A lumbar roll, like
    McKenzie Super Roll™
    McKenzie SuperRoll™

    McKenzie SuperRoll™, is convenient to place in your carry-on, and can be used both in a car and on a plane. Place it at your back, opposite your navel, supporting the natural curve in your spine. If you are in a car, look at the position of your seat: try to sit up tall, with your hips all the way back in the seat. Make sure your seat tilt is adjusted so that your hips are NOT lower than your knees.

  1.  Stand and Extend.  In order to restore your body’s balance and calibrate your spine, stand up and extend your back (put your hands on your waist and lean back).  Perform 5 back extensions each time you stop for gas, or when getting up to use the restroom.

Remember, keep moving. Hopefully, with these tips, you will start your vacation feeling healthy and pain free. Safe travels!

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists PC (ONS) is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice in Greenwich, CT. ONS physicians provide expertise in sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopaedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, please visit www.onsmd.com.

Looks like more snow is in the forecast, we have some skiing tips for you!

skierThe knee is the most vulnerable body part for any athlete, including skiers. Downhill skiing produces large amounts of torque on the knee, challenging the integrity of ligaments and tendons. Whether from a fall or overuse, the most common injuries in skiers are tears to the MCL (Medial Collateral Ligament) or ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament), two important structures that give our knee stability.  When a skier is thrown off balance, his skis will sometimes shoot out in front of him, creating extra torque on the knees and damaging our stabilizing structures.

Both novice and experienced skiers are at risk of hurting their knees. We frequently see novice skiers hurt themselves when they do not know how to turn, stop or fall properly. Taking lessons and working with an instructor goes a long way in preventing knee injuries for beginner skiers. Experienced skiers frequently take risks and assume that they can manage faster speeds on any slope.  Many injuries, whether you are a beginner or an experienced skier, are related to weather conditions. It is important to realize that as visibility and surface conditions deteriorate, the slope or trail level goes up. In poor visibility or icy conditions, a beginner trail becomes an intermediate trail, and an intermediate slope becomes advanced slope. Keep injury prevention in mind, if the conditions are difficult, ski down a level.

A second reason injuries occur is fatigue. Most skiers’ bodies are not accustomed to exercising 6-8 straight hours. In addition, many skiers push their bodies to take advantage of the whole day, even when they start to feel tired and stiff.  For this reason, injuries tend to happen at the end of the day.

Having the knowledge of what places skiers at a higher risk for knee injuries, we are passing on recommendations about how to stay safe on the slopes.  Both beginners and experienced skiers can benefit from these tips!

  1. Start a conditioning program a few months before your first ski trip. Leg strengthening, flexibility and balance are important aspects of an adequate ski conditioning program.
  2. Ski with good technique. Maintain your balance and control, keep your hips above your knees, keep your arms forward, and maintain a safe speed.
  3. Learn how to fall correctly: keep your legs together, keep your chin to your chest and your arms up and forward.
  4. Pay attention to weather conditions and remember to ski down a level if conditions deteriorate.
  5. Listen to your body. If you start to feel pain or stiffness upon exiting the lift chair, then you should probably make that run your last. Head to the lodge and enjoy a warm drink by the fire.

Good luck and stay warm!

If you become injured, while skiing, remember, ONS sports medicine physicians are trained at the top universities and hospitals in the country and have expertise in the latest treatments for sports-related injuries in high-performance and recreational athletes.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit http://onsmd.com/ or call 203.869.1145.

 

ONS Physical Therapist, Alicia Hirscht Discusses How to Help Avoid Neck and Back Pain in the Workplace

ONS Senior Clinical Specialist Alicia Hirsch
ONS Senior Clinical Specialist Alicia Hirsch

Let’s face it, if you don’t have a smartphone or a tablet, LTE or Wi-Fi, if you are not tweeting and networking 24/7….well, with the way we all depend on technology today, you might as well be living in a cave and drawing hieroglyphics!

We’ve come a long way from the years of the caveman, the question is, at what expense have we make this progress? From manufacturing and robotics, trading and purchasing, to filing and storage of records and data, almost everyone in the workplace uses computer technology. While computers and the internet enable workers to be more efficient and productive, our global workforce is quickly becoming more sedentary, and more painful.

Data collected from office workers reveals that 20% suffer from chronic neck pain, and 60-70% report having suffered from neck pain at some point in their career. Neck pain is highly correlated to workers who sit with a forward head for more than 5 hours per day, and is twice as likely to affect women and workers older than 40. Luckily, though, research also shows that workers who exercised regularly, reported good sleep habits and engaged in productive stress management reported a lower incidence of neck pain.

While 8 hours of sleep, regular meditation and a gym membership (that you actually use) might not fit into your busy, computer driven life, do not worry, hope is not lost. There are small steps you can take to keep yourself as pain free in the office as possible… and less irritable.

Step 1: Get up and move! We are not built to sit, we are built to MOVE. Set a timer on your computer that reminds you to change position every 20 minutes. Even if you stand for 1 minute 2 times an hour, your risk of developing neck pain reduces dramatically. While standing, engage is some basic exercises that can be done easily at your desk (see below).

Extensions: Place your hands on your waist and lean your shoulders back. Move slowly, repeat 15 times.
Extensions: Place your hands on your waist and lean your shoulders back. Move slowly, repeat 15 times.

Chin tuck: Pull your chin back towards your spine, keeping your eyes focused straight ahead. Hold for 3 seconds, relax, repeat 15 times.
Chin tuck: Pull your chin back towards your spine, keeping your eyes focused straight ahead. Hold for 3 seconds, relax, repeat 15 times.

Stand with your shoulders back and your chin tucked. Take a large step back with your right foot, allowing your left leg to bend. Sit your hips down into the stretch, hold for 20 seconds, repeat on each leg.
Stand with your shoulders back and your chin tucked. Take a large step back with your right foot, allowing your left leg to bend. Sit your hips down into the stretch, hold for 20 seconds, repeat on each leg.

Chest stretch: Reach up and back with one arm while reaching down and back with the other, open up your chest and squeeze your shoulder blades together. Keep your chin tucked, hold for 15 seconds.
Chest stretch: Reach up and back with one arm while reaching down and back with the other, open up your chest and squeeze your shoulder blades together. Keep your chin tucked, hold for 15 seconds.

Step 2: Make sure your work area is set up properly. Your desktop monitor should be even with your line of sight. Not in a corner away from you, right in front of you. If you work with a lap top or tablet, prop them up on risers so that you do not have to look down. Consider wireless/external keyboards to keep your hands in front of you and your elbows bent at 90 degree angles. Use a lumbar support to keep your spine in a neutral position, and adjust your seat height so that your hips, knees and ankles can rest at 90 degree angles. (See the picture below) Download or view our Workstation Ergonomics flyer to use as a guideline for improving your work space to help improve sitting posture and help to minimize neck and back pain.

NeckPain_Office
Desktop even with your eye sight, lumbar support to keep spine in a neutral position, knees and ankles resting at 90 degree angles.

If you are experiencing neck and back pain it may be time to talk to the experts at the ONS Spine Center. ONS Spine Center physicians specialize in non-operative and operative treatments for neck and back pain. Visit the Back and Neck Pain page on our website to learn more and see our physicians. To learn about our physical therapy services visit ONS Physical Therapy.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com or call 203.869.1145.


14 Doctors from ONS included in Greenwich Magazine’s Top Doctors list

When you need the name of a good doctor, ask another doctor.  As a means to that end, each year Moffly Media asks Castle Connolly, the physician-led medical research team that vets doctors nationwide, to provide a list of top physicians in Fairfield County for their annual Top Doctors list. The January 2013 Top Doctors issue of Greenwich, Stamford, New Canaan/ Darien and Westport Magazines contains information on over 323 doctors in 48 medical specialties.  This year’s list includes 14 doctors from Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) in Greenwich Office Park:  neurosurgeons – Paul Apostolides, MD, Mark Camel, MD, Amory Fiore, MD and Scott Simon, MD; orthopedic surgeons – Michael Clain, MD; James Cunningham, MD; John F. Crowe, MD; Frank Ennis, MD Steven Hindman, MD; Brian Kavanagh, MD; Seth Miller, MD; David Nocek, MD; and Paul Sethi, MD; physiatrist – Jeffrey Heftler, MD.

“Once again, we are proud to have so many of our skilled physicians recognized in this year’s Top Doctors lists,” said Dr. Seth Miller.  “Our doctors are among the very best in the country. Each has been hand-picked for their superior credentials and experience”

Each year Castle Connolly’s experts ask medical leaders across the country to identify physicians they believe to be the best in their respective fields. The nominees’ credentials, including educational and professional experience, are then carefully screened and the list compiled.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com or call (203) 869-1145.

Calendar of Health Information Programs by ONS Physicians at Greenwich Hospital

PROGRAMS CALENDAR 2014

This year the physicians at ONS will present health information seminars for the public on a variety of topics ranging from joint replacement to common soccer injuries, injury prevention and treatments. Sessions to take place in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich, and followed by a question and answer period where the public may pose questions to the presenters. To register for upcoming ONS programs at Greenwich Hospital, please call (203) 863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register on-line at http://www.greenhosp.org/.

2 APRIL 2014 – Joint Symposium, Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich <read more>

Past Topics

Knee Pain Seminar

Chichi_knee anatomy
For millions of Americans, knee pain is a daily reality. Many people try to ignore pain caused by arthritis in the knee joint for as long as possible in hopes that it will go away. However, arthritis is a progressive disease and for many, will even become debilitating. On December 3, 2013, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Demetris Delos presented a “Knee Pain Seminar” addressing treatment options for knee pain due to early-stage arthritis. He discussed non-operative and operative solutions from therapeutic injections, arthroscopic procedures to osteotomy and partial knee replacement. The seminar was free and open to the public.

Speaker: Orthopedic Surgeon Demetris Delos, MD

ONS is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice serving patients throughout Fairfield and Westchester Counties and the New York Metropolitan area. ONS physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com, or call (203) 869-1145.

Osteoporosis: Prevention, Treatment and Managementgraphic

Osteoporosis, a disease that weakens the bones and leads to fractures, affects 28 million Americans and contributes to an estimated 1.5 million bone fractures every year. Half of all women older than 65 and one in five men is affected by osteoporosis. On Wednesday, October 23, 2013 at 6:30 pm, physicians with ONS and Greenwich Hospital hosted a seminar on Osteoporosis: Prevention, Treatment and Management. The public was invited to hear from medical experts what measures may be taken to prevent bone loss or minimize its effects. Presenters included Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Endocrinologist Ranee Lleva, MD, and Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter. The program took place in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road and was free of charge. To register for ONS programs at Greenwich Hospital, please call (203) 863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register on-line at www.greenhosp.org. For more information on topics related to orthopedics, visit www.onsmd.com

Speakers: Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Endocrinologist Ranee Lleva, MD, and Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter. Wednesday, October 23, 6:30-8 pm

Cartilage Transplantation Offers New Hope for Damaged Knees

Delos Office Vertical
Dr. Demetris Delos

Cartilage transplantation offers exciting new treatment options for adults under the age of 50 who have had their knee damaged through acute or chronic trauma to the knee. The surgeon uses small cylindrical plugs of good cartilage and inserts them into the damaged areas. This procedure has been shown to be highly effective in patients who have sustained a specific injury to the knee cartilage or joint lining, and who have not yet developed arthritis. Many competitive athletes who have undergone the treatment have returned to their full performance level after surgery.

Speaker: Orthopaedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist Demetris Delos, MD

Women’s Sports Medicine Center forum at Greenwich Hospital

WSMC group photo cu

Who would know better how to treat active women of all ages and levels of sports activity than the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center physician and physical therapy team?

In addition to being experts in their fields as orthopedic surgeons and sports medicine specialists, the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center team is comprised of current and former athletes and fitness enthusiasts who know first-hand what it takes to train and excel in a sport. (In fact, Dr. Katie Vadasdi, an orthopedic surgeon, is an accomplished tri-athlete who has completed two Ironman competitions, is an alpine climber and has ascended Mount Kilimanjaro, Mount Rainier and the Grand Teton.)

Come hear the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center panel discussion hosted by Greenwich Hospital:

“Women Treating Women”

The event, which took place in the Noble Conference Room at Greenwich Hospital, featured the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine experts in a panel discussion regarding the latest diagnostic and medical management techniques for injuries and conditions common in female athletes.

The public was invited to bring their sports injury or fitness-related questions and get answers from a team of physicians who have provided medical support to five Olympic Games, international biking and fencing championships, and medical coverage for the Columbia University sports teams and Greenwich High School sports.

Women’s Sports Medicine Panel:

Katie Vadasdi, MD, Orthopedic Surgeon, Sports Medicine Specialist Fellowship Training: Columbia University Medical Center

Gloria Cohen, MD, Primary Care Sports Medicine, Olympic Team Physician Post Graduate Sports Medicine, University of British Columbia

Tamar Kessel, MD, Physiatrist, Interventional Sports and Spine Fellowship Training: Hospital for Special Surgery

Laura Liebesman, PT, Director of ONS Physical Therapy Specialties- Golf mechanics, Orthopedics and Spine PT Certification – University of Pennsylvania

 

Golf Advice For US Open Championship Fans

Golf may be perceived as a low risk sport, but it is physically demanding and golf related injuries are increasing.

Another great stretch to do before and during play.
A great stretch to do before and during play.

If watching the US Open Championship has inspired you to head for the links, here are a few exercises for golfers to ensure an injury free day on the course and to get the most out of your summer golf! The pros do it, you should too!

Golf advice for US Open Championship fans!

1. Train by repetitive motor learning specific to golf. Example: long distance runners are not trained by sprinting.

2. Never separate the torso from the hips while swinging.

3. For a more beneficial aerobic workout, walk outside, NOT on a treadmill.

4. Improving flexibility will result in fewer injuries, swing consistency, improved distance through less compensation and greater power.

5. Remember to stretch AFTER you warm-up your muscles.

6. To achieve a more powerful swing, strengthen your core through resistance training, yoga and Pilates.

7. Avoid surgery by taking care of your body on and off the course through exercise, healthy diet habits and minimizing stress.

8. Wrist weakness and radiating forearm pain could be “golfers elbow.” Be sure to maintain proper form and resist the temptation to play too much. REST is the best treatment for this injury.

9. Swimming, biking and using the elliptical machine are three of the most effective cross-training exercises.

10. When picking up your ball, always remember to bend with your knees.

Most IMPORTANTLY: Listen to your body and don’t play if you’re experiencing pain or are tired. If something is beginning to hurt, get it checked out.

– See more at: http://onsmd.com/2012/07/02/golf-hazards-and-injury-prevention/#sthash.pKnTk8as.dpuf