ONS MDs to Discuss Chronic Pain

Demetris Delos, MD and Christopher Sahler, MD of ONS to discuss effective treatments for Chronic Pain.

Maintaining quality of life while living with chronic pain is no easy feat. Two orthopedic specialists from ONS will discuss effective new treatments to help people with relentless pain return to the WavenyPain Flyer (2)activities they enjoy.  Join Demetris Delos, MD, an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in sports medicine an comprehensive knee and shoulder, and interventional pain management physiatrist, Christopher Sahler, MD for this informative talk on Wednesday, May 11 at The Inn at Waveny, 73 Oenoke Ridge in New Canaan.  Doors open at 4:00 pm for refreshments. Presentation begins at 4:30. RSVP at 203-594-5310 or mntiri@waveny.org.

 

New ACL Repair Study

New ACL Repair Study is Promising but Limited, said ONS Knee Surgeon Demetris Delos, MD.

Today’s New York Times reports that using a patient’s own blood to help heal an ACL tear has shown promising results in a small study conducted by the Boston Children’s Hospital.  While having a torn ligament heal itself could be the holy grail of ligament surgery, ONS knee surgeon, Demetris Delos, MD, cautions that more thorough research is ACL-Injury-300dpi-illustrationneeded.  The trial involved only 10 patients and recovery was tracked just a few months after surgery. “These early results are exciting,” Dr. Delos said, “but it is important to see how these patients do in the medium and long term (several years after surgery) especially when it comes to returning to active lifestyles and the trials need to be expanded to much larger groups of  people to see how it translates to the population at large.”  Until the long term safety and efficacy can be determined, he said, current ACL reconstruction surgery, which replaces the injured ligament with a tendon from other areas of the body such as the hamstring or patellar tendon, will remain the standard as it has proven successful with predictable results and allows the majority of patients to return to their pre-injury activities.

Female Athletes and ACL Injuries

Did you know that female athletes are from two to ten times more likely to suffer an ACL injury than their male counterparts?  

Woman playing tennis at the professional tournamentDifferences in pelvis width, the size of the ACL and the intercondylar notch (where the ACL crosses the knee joint), are all thought to play a role. What’s more, the upper part of a female’s shin bone at the joint is much shorter and more rounded than a male’s, which creates a greater laxity in the joint. Women also tend to have an inward angle to their knees, otherwise known as knocked knees, which places more stress across the outer knee joint and ligaments, particularly when it comes to sudden or extreme movements, such as an abrupt change in direction or pivot. Women also move differently than men. For instance, they tend to land from a jump with their knees in a somewhat straight position, pulling on the quadriceps rather than the hamstrings. Because of this, the force of the impact is transferred to the knee, creating a high risk for an ACL rupture. Men, on the other hand, are better able to absorb the impact because they tend to land with bent knees.

For these reasons, it is crucial for female athletes of all ages to modify their natural biomechanics through neuromuscular training programs that can teach them better ways to move their bodies and protect their knees, said orthopedic surgeon Katie Vadasdi, MD, who heads the Women’s Sports Medicine Center at ONS. “Through neuromuscular training programs, we can help female athletes significantly reduce the risk of ACL ruptures by developing balance between the quadriceps and hamstrings and improving the landing biomechanics with more bent knees and hips to avoid a knock-kneed position on impact.”

Preventing ACL injuries has both near and long term benefits so the sooner you get started with this kind of a conditioning program the better. Studies indicate that there is a tenfold increase in the incidence of osteoarthritis in the knees of women who suffered an ACL injury at some point in their lives. Moreover, injuries that were incurred during youth seem to result in the onset of osteoarthritic symptoms at a much earlier age in adulthood.

Learn more about ACL injuries here.

ONS Stamford: Off to a Great Start

ONS_Stamford
5 High Ridge Park, 3rd floor, Stamford, CT 06905

On the evening of June 22, 2015, Orthopedic & Neurosurgery Specialists (ONS) held a grand opening celebration of a second ONS location at 5 High Ridge Park in Stamford, CT. The event was a first look at the new facility for the public, complete with informative stations about injury prevention, exercise tips and sports medicine stations with medical models and video presentations. Throughout the evening, around 200 guests toured the office, and learned about injuries and treatments of the foot and ankle, hand and wrist, shoulder and elbow, hip and knee, spine and Platelet Rich Plasma treatment. ONS physicians were available to answer questions. ONS Physical Therapy showcased injury prevention exercises for tennis, golf and running. Local businesses participated in the evening as guests enjoyed food and beverage and displays and a drawing of exciting prizes. The ONS physicians, clinicians and staff members were pleased with the opportunity to meet and greet the Stamford community! To learn more about our new Stamford office please visit http://onsmd.com/ons-stamford/.

An Arthritic Reality Check

Arthritis affects more than 52 million adults in the United States and is the most common cause of disability,” according to the CDC. The pain from arthritis can set the stage for a decline in physical activity and make it difficult to prevent chronic health problems. Unfortunately, some who suffer from this ailment stop their activity and become depressed from thoughts of the mobility they once had.

Solutions for Knee Pain ArticleJane E. Brody, author of the “Keep  Moving to Stay a Step Ahead of Arthritis” article in The New York Times recently attempted to relate to those suffering from arthritis by speaking of her own battle with having to put down the tennis racket after decades of enjoying the sport, and her story did not end there. Two years after that, she had joint replacement surgery, picked up an assortment of other activities that successfully replaced tennis as a main source of activity. Therefore, encouraging others to do the same and not succumb to the depression that can sometimes come in hand with arthritis.

The reality is that the majority of people dealing with arthritis do not fully understand what they are capable of. Less than 10% of participants with arthritic knees in a 10-year study met the national guidelines of doing two and a half hours of moderate physical activity a week. Yes, you read that correctly, a week! It gets better though. Participants did notice a significant improvement of function when the amount of activity per week was increased. Additional weight on the body creates unnecessary stress on the major joints as well, leaving a 10% decrease in weight able to make a noticeable difference. With this fact a recommendation of starter exercises were mentioned, including walking laps in a swimming pool and then increasing activity as the muscles gain strength.

For more insightful tips, come to Dr. Delos’ talk about “Solutions for Knee Pain in Active Patients with Arthritis” tonight! The program is free and open to the public! Registration Requested. Aside from the talk, please consult your physician if this article has hit home and/or your quality of life is not what it once was; ONS provides excellent service and care for those in need, proudly keeping up-to-date with developments in the field.

Orthopaedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist Dr. Demetris Delos on NY Giants Victor Cruz’s Injury

Dr. Delos served as Assistant NFL Team Physician for the New York Football Giants and

Demetris Delos, MD
Demetris Delos, MD

team physician for local high school and college athletes. His practice is focused on sports medicine and arthroscopic treatment of knee and shoulder disorders including knee preservation surgery, shoulder instability and rotator cuff repair. Upon hearing about the NY Giants’ Wide Receiver Victor Cruz’s knee injury, we reached out to Dr. Delos to give us insight on Victor’s type of injury. Dr. Delos said:

“Victor Cruz sustained a devastating injury to his knee last night, an injury that will cost him the rest of the season. While attempting to catch a ball in the end zone, he tore the patellar tendon in his right knee. The patellar tendon is a structure that attaches the kneecap (patella) to the shinbone (tibia). When the patellar tendon is torn, the player cannot straighten (extend) his knee and obviously cannot perform at the high level expected in the NFL.

Patellar tendon ruptures are relatively uncommon injuries that occur in otherwise healthy players without any predisposing factors. The mechanism of injury is typically eccentric overload (forcibly bending the knee while the quadricep is firing).

Studies of NFL players with this injury report that the vast majority are able to return to NFL level play after surgery and extensive rehabilitation. Let’s wish Victor a speedy recovery so we can watch him salsa in the end zone again!”

For more information on knee injuries, visit Our Specialties page.

ONS Docs Included in Castle Connolly New York Top Doctors Guide, 17th edition

14 Specialists from ONS included in New York Area Medical Guide Book top primary care and specialty care doctors in the tri-state metropolitan New York area.

Fourteen physicians from Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists (ONS) on Valley Drive are included in the latest edition of Castle Connolly Top Doctors, New York Metro Area guidebook. The resource directory, which is in its seventeenth edition, is a guide to finding the top primary care and specialty care doctors in the tri-state metropolitan New York area. It details information on over 6,400 physicians in 65 specialties. Physicians profiled in the guide were nominated by their peers and screened by a research team at Castle Connolly.

ONS Neurosurgeon Paul Apostolides, MD
Paul Apostolides, MD
Mark Camel, MD
Mark Camel, MD
Doctor Photos_Fiore_web
Amory Fiore, MD
Scott Simon, MD
Scott Simon, MD
Michael Clain, MD
Michael Clain, MD
Doctor Photos_Crowe
John Crowe, MD
James Cunningham, MD
James Cunningham, MD
Frank Ennis, MD
Frank Ennis, MD
Brian Kavanagh, MD
Brian Kavanagh, MD
Seth Miller, MD
Seth Miller, MD
Paul Sethi, MD
Paul Sethi, MD
Katie Vadasdi, MD, orthopaedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist
Katie Vadasdi, MD
Jeffrey Heftler MD, Physiatrist
Jeffrey Heftler, MD

Castle Connolly Top Doctors® are nominated by their peers including physicians and hospital executives throughout the New York metropolitan region in an online survey process. Nominations are open to all board certified MDs and DOs. Nominated physicians are selected by the Castle Connolly physician-led research team based on criteria including medical education, training, hospital appointments, disciplinary histories and much more.

ONS physicians included in the 17th edition of the guide are neurosurgeons Paul Apostolides, MD; Mark Camel, MD;  Amory Fiore, MD; and Scott Simon, MD, orthopedic surgeons Michael Clain, MD; John Crowe, MD; James Cunningham, MD; Frank Ennis, MD; Steven Hindman, MD; Brian Kavanagh, MD; Seth Miller, MD; Paul Sethi, MD; and Katie Vadasdi, MD and physiatrist Jeffrey Heftler, MD.

“We congratulate our physicians who have been recognized as ‘Top Doctors’ by Castle Connolly,” said hand and wrist specialist Dr. John Crowe. “Having fourteen of our fine doctors included in this authoritative guide is a reflection of the commitment and quality of excellence of all our physicians and entire staff at ONS. The multidisciplinary nature of ONS makes it possible to provide patients with access to the most advanced care available in orthopedics, neurosurgery and physiatry.”

Survey recipients are asked to nominate those doctors who, in their judgment, are the best in their field and related fields– especially those to whom they would refer their own patients and family members.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists PC (ONS) is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice in Greenwich, CT. ONS physicians provide expertise in sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopaedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, please visit www.onsmd.com.

ONS Doctors Receive 40 Under 40 Award

Congratulations to Dr. Vitale and Dr. Vadasdi of Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, Greenwich, CT, who received the 40 Under 40 award June 19, 2014, at the Palace in Stamford!

Dr. Vitale is  recognized for his career adv40Under40Winnersances, contribution to published research, community involvement and organizing trips to the country of Haiti where he and a group of clinician/physicians provide medical services to those in need.

Dr. Vadasdi was recognized for achievements in her medical career in orthopedics and sports medicine, for her community work and as an athlete.

Each year WAG Magazine and Fairfield County Business Journal recognize 40 professionals under the age of 40 as leaders in the workplace and community. Nominees are submitted and winners are decided by a panel. This year marked the 10th anniversary of this award. We are proud of both our winners, the work they do here at ONS, in the community and abroad.

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Looks like more snow is in the forecast, we have some skiing tips for you!

skierThe knee is the most vulnerable body part for any athlete, including skiers. Downhill skiing produces large amounts of torque on the knee, challenging the integrity of ligaments and tendons. Whether from a fall or overuse, the most common injuries in skiers are tears to the MCL (Medial Collateral Ligament) or ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament), two important structures that give our knee stability.  When a skier is thrown off balance, his skis will sometimes shoot out in front of him, creating extra torque on the knees and damaging our stabilizing structures.

Both novice and experienced skiers are at risk of hurting their knees. We frequently see novice skiers hurt themselves when they do not know how to turn, stop or fall properly. Taking lessons and working with an instructor goes a long way in preventing knee injuries for beginner skiers. Experienced skiers frequently take risks and assume that they can manage faster speeds on any slope.  Many injuries, whether you are a beginner or an experienced skier, are related to weather conditions. It is important to realize that as visibility and surface conditions deteriorate, the slope or trail level goes up. In poor visibility or icy conditions, a beginner trail becomes an intermediate trail, and an intermediate slope becomes advanced slope. Keep injury prevention in mind, if the conditions are difficult, ski down a level.

A second reason injuries occur is fatigue. Most skiers’ bodies are not accustomed to exercising 6-8 straight hours. In addition, many skiers push their bodies to take advantage of the whole day, even when they start to feel tired and stiff.  For this reason, injuries tend to happen at the end of the day.

Having the knowledge of what places skiers at a higher risk for knee injuries, we are passing on recommendations about how to stay safe on the slopes.  Both beginners and experienced skiers can benefit from these tips!

  1. Start a conditioning program a few months before your first ski trip. Leg strengthening, flexibility and balance are important aspects of an adequate ski conditioning program.
  2. Ski with good technique. Maintain your balance and control, keep your hips above your knees, keep your arms forward, and maintain a safe speed.
  3. Learn how to fall correctly: keep your legs together, keep your chin to your chest and your arms up and forward.
  4. Pay attention to weather conditions and remember to ski down a level if conditions deteriorate.
  5. Listen to your body. If you start to feel pain or stiffness upon exiting the lift chair, then you should probably make that run your last. Head to the lodge and enjoy a warm drink by the fire.

Good luck and stay warm!

If you become injured, while skiing, remember, ONS sports medicine physicians are trained at the top universities and hospitals in the country and have expertise in the latest treatments for sports-related injuries in high-performance and recreational athletes.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit http://onsmd.com/ or call 203.869.1145.

 

ONS Knee Specialist Dr. Katie Vadasdi discusses Olympic Athlete Lindsey Vonn’s Injury

The ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center team of experts consists of current and former athletes and fitness enthusiasts who know firsthand what it takes to train and excel in a sport. With the 2014 Olympics just a few weeks away, ONS orthopedic surgeon and women’s sports medicine specialist, Katie Vadasdi, MD, shared her expert opinion on one of the latest setbacks in Olympic history.

DrVadasdi_WEB

In recent news, US skiing champion, and Olympic gold medalist Lindsey Vonn stated that she would be pulling out of the 2014 Sochi Olympics in Russia. The famed downhill skier experienced a series of knee injuries which led to her decision not compete.  When asked about Lindsey’s decision, Dr. Vadasdi said, “Vonn has made an appropriate but difficult decision to pull out of the winter Olympics this year in order to give her knee the medical attention it requires.  Her sport requires an incredible amount of strength and having an unstable knee puts her in a dangerous position where she might further injure her knee or cause other injuries.”

Last February, Lindsey tore two ligaments in her right knee and broke a bone in the same leg during an intense crash at the world championships. Upon returning to the sport, Vonn reinjured her surgically repaired ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) when she crashed during a training session. Two weeks later, Lindsey suffered another injury when she sprained her MCL (medial collateral ligament), during a downhill event. After reconstructive knee surgery in February 2013, Vonn posted on Facebook that she “is devastated” to miss the Olympics, “but the reality has sunk in that my knee is just too unstable to compete at this level.”

Each year, at least 1 in 3,000 Americans between the ages of 14 and 55 tear an ACL while exercising or playing sports.  Skiers are among the group of athletes who are more likely to experience an ACL injury. Dr. Vadasdi said of Vonn’s injury, “she will undergo ACL reconstruction which will provide her knee the stability it requires to return to such highly-competitive skiing.” A reconstructed ACL not only stabilizes the knee, but also prevents damage to the menisci cartilage that often occurs due to an unstable joint.

“By making the decision now to withdraw from the Olympics and to undergo the surgery, she will allow herself the necessary time to recover and fully rehab her knee to get her back on the slopes safely and at her height competitive level.”

To learn more about ACL Injuries, click here: http://onsmd.com/condition_treatment/acl-injuries/ and visit our Women’s Sports Medicine Center at http://onsmd.com/sports-medicine/womens-sports-medicine-center/.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com or call 203.869.1145.

 

Calendar of Health Information Programs by ONS Physicians at Greenwich Hospital

PROGRAMS CALENDAR 2014

This year the physicians at ONS will present health information seminars for the public on a variety of topics ranging from joint replacement to common soccer injuries, injury prevention and treatments. Sessions to take place in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich, and followed by a question and answer period where the public may pose questions to the presenters. To register for upcoming ONS programs at Greenwich Hospital, please call (203) 863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register on-line at http://www.greenhosp.org/.

2 APRIL 2014 – Joint Symposium, Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich <read more>

Past Topics

Knee Pain Seminar

Chichi_knee anatomy
For millions of Americans, knee pain is a daily reality. Many people try to ignore pain caused by arthritis in the knee joint for as long as possible in hopes that it will go away. However, arthritis is a progressive disease and for many, will even become debilitating. On December 3, 2013, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Demetris Delos presented a “Knee Pain Seminar” addressing treatment options for knee pain due to early-stage arthritis. He discussed non-operative and operative solutions from therapeutic injections, arthroscopic procedures to osteotomy and partial knee replacement. The seminar was free and open to the public.

Speaker: Orthopedic Surgeon Demetris Delos, MD

ONS is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice serving patients throughout Fairfield and Westchester Counties and the New York Metropolitan area. ONS physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com, or call (203) 869-1145.

Osteoporosis: Prevention, Treatment and Managementgraphic

Osteoporosis, a disease that weakens the bones and leads to fractures, affects 28 million Americans and contributes to an estimated 1.5 million bone fractures every year. Half of all women older than 65 and one in five men is affected by osteoporosis. On Wednesday, October 23, 2013 at 6:30 pm, physicians with ONS and Greenwich Hospital hosted a seminar on Osteoporosis: Prevention, Treatment and Management. The public was invited to hear from medical experts what measures may be taken to prevent bone loss or minimize its effects. Presenters included Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Endocrinologist Ranee Lleva, MD, and Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter. The program took place in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road and was free of charge. To register for ONS programs at Greenwich Hospital, please call (203) 863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register on-line at www.greenhosp.org. For more information on topics related to orthopedics, visit www.onsmd.com

Speakers: Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Endocrinologist Ranee Lleva, MD, and Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter. Wednesday, October 23, 6:30-8 pm

Cartilage Transplantation Offers New Hope for Damaged Knees

Delos Office Vertical
Dr. Demetris Delos

Cartilage transplantation offers exciting new treatment options for adults under the age of 50 who have had their knee damaged through acute or chronic trauma to the knee. The surgeon uses small cylindrical plugs of good cartilage and inserts them into the damaged areas. This procedure has been shown to be highly effective in patients who have sustained a specific injury to the knee cartilage or joint lining, and who have not yet developed arthritis. Many competitive athletes who have undergone the treatment have returned to their full performance level after surgery.

Speaker: Orthopaedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist Demetris Delos, MD

Women’s Sports Medicine Center forum at Greenwich Hospital

WSMC group photo cu

Who would know better how to treat active women of all ages and levels of sports activity than the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center physician and physical therapy team?

In addition to being experts in their fields as orthopedic surgeons and sports medicine specialists, the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center team is comprised of current and former athletes and fitness enthusiasts who know first-hand what it takes to train and excel in a sport. (In fact, Dr. Katie Vadasdi, an orthopedic surgeon, is an accomplished tri-athlete who has completed two Ironman competitions, is an alpine climber and has ascended Mount Kilimanjaro, Mount Rainier and the Grand Teton.)

Come hear the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center panel discussion hosted by Greenwich Hospital:

“Women Treating Women”

The event, which took place in the Noble Conference Room at Greenwich Hospital, featured the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine experts in a panel discussion regarding the latest diagnostic and medical management techniques for injuries and conditions common in female athletes.

The public was invited to bring their sports injury or fitness-related questions and get answers from a team of physicians who have provided medical support to five Olympic Games, international biking and fencing championships, and medical coverage for the Columbia University sports teams and Greenwich High School sports.

Women’s Sports Medicine Panel:

Katie Vadasdi, MD, Orthopedic Surgeon, Sports Medicine Specialist Fellowship Training: Columbia University Medical Center

Gloria Cohen, MD, Primary Care Sports Medicine, Olympic Team Physician Post Graduate Sports Medicine, University of British Columbia

Tamar Kessel, MD, Physiatrist, Interventional Sports and Spine Fellowship Training: Hospital for Special Surgery

Laura Liebesman, PT, Director of ONS Physical Therapy Specialties- Golf mechanics, Orthopedics and Spine PT Certification – University of Pennsylvania

 

Cartilage Transplantation Offers New Hope for Damaged Knees

Delos Office Vertical
Dr. Demetris Delos

Speaker: Orthopaedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist Demetris Delos, MD

Tuesday, October 29th, 6:30 pm, Noble Conference Room Center at Greenwich Hospital

Cartilage transplantation offers exciting new treatment options for adults under the age of 50 who have had their knee damaged through acute or chronic trauma to the knee. The surgeon uses small cylindrical plugs of good cartilage and inserts them into the damaged areas. This procedure has been shown to be highly effective in patients who have sustained a specific injury to the knee cartilage or joint lining, and who have not yet developed arthritis. Many competitive athletes who have undergone the treatment have returned to their full performance level after surgery.

To register To register for the ONS programs at Greenwich Hospital, please call (203)
863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register on-line at www.greenhosp.org.

 

 

Dr. Tim Greene explains ITB Syndrome

Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS) is a common injury in runners of all levels that is caused by friction between the iliotibial band and the outer aspect of the knee or hip.  When the knee reaches 20 to 30 degrees of flexion, the iliotibial band is closest to the outer aspect of the knee which may produce friction and pain.  This syndrome, which can be very painful, can be brought on from running downhill, uphill or at a slower pace, all of which place the knee at a lower flexion angle in the 20 to 30 degree range. Runners with anatomic variations of the leg that place it in an inwardly rotated position may predispose to this condition. Flat feet (pronation), knocked knees (valgus) and weak outer hip muscles are all associated with an inward position of the leg.

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Dr. Timothy Green examining a patient experiencing pain caused by ITBS.

IMG_2560Developing outer hip or knee pain after 2-3 consecutive runs may be a sign of ITBS. An adequate period of rest is the most important course of action in alleviating these symptoms. Continuing to run through the pain will only serve to worsen the symptoms. A proper warm-up and stretching of the iliotibial band is paramount in relieving and preventing ITBS.  Continued outer hip or knee pain at baseline or with the resumption of running after a 10 day to 2 week course of rest should warrant an evaluation by a sports medicine physician.

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The majority of ITBS resolves with the appropriate non-surgical management. This may include formal physical therapy, anti-inflammatory medication, or an injection of cortisone or platelets. In rare cases that fail a long course of non-surgical management, arthroscopic surgery to remove the inflamed tissue and loosen the tight iliotibial band maybe necessary.

Powerpoint presentation of talk on Therapeutic Injections Available Online

On Tuesday, June 4th, Physiatrist Dr. Jeffrey Heftler gave an informative talk at Greenwich Hospital on how some sports injuries may be effectively treated with therapeutic injections.  If you missed the talk, here is a link to his powerpoint presentation:

Dr. Jeffrey Heftler – Injection of Knee and Hip

Physiatrist Dr. Jeffrey Heftler gave a talk at Greenwich Hospital on Injection Therapy for sports injuries.
Physiatrist Dr. Jeffrey Heftler gave a talk at Greenwich Hospital on Injection Therapy for sports injuries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Greenwich Hospital Appoints Steven Hindman, MD as Director of Orthopaedic Surgery

Orthopedic surgeon Steven Hindman, MD has bee appointed Director of Orthopedics at Greenwich Hospital.
Orthopedic surgeon Steven Hindman, MD has bee appointed Director of Orthopedics at Greenwich Hospital.

Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Steven Hindman has been named Director of Orthopedic Surgery at Greenwich Hospital. Dr. Hindman has been on staff at Greenwich Hospital since 1987 when he began his practice with Greenwich Orthopedic Associates on Lake Avenue. In 1992, the group moved into Greenwich Office Park on Valley Drive. They later merged with Orthopaedic Associates and formed ONS (Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists).

Dr. Hindman treats the full spectrum of orthopedic conditions and injuries from ankle sprains to ACL ruptures to degenerative joint disease. He is also actively involved in injury prevention on behalf of the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education, and speaks to community groups on fall prevention, skiing injuries and osteoporosis.

Dr. Hindman was born in Newtown, MA and graduated from University of Rochester, New York. He received his medical degree from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York in 1982 and did his residency in Orthopedic Surgery at Montefiore Hospital, Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York from 1982 to 1987. Dr. Hindman is Board Certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery and is a former Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He is included in the list of Castle Connolly New York Area Top Doctors.

Greenwich Hospital New Mini-Med Seminar series begins with talk on Joint Disease by Paul Sethi, MD

Paul Sethi, MD
Orthopaedic surgeon Paul Sethi, MD

On Wednesday, March 13 at 6:30-7:30 p.m., Greenwich Hospital will begin a new Mini-Med Seminar series. The first program, “Let’s talk about Joints: Degenerative Joint Disease (DJD); Causes, Symptoms and Treatments,” will be presented by ONS orthopaedic Surgeon Dr. Paul Sethi in Hospital’s Noble Conference Center at 5 Perryridge Road. Attendance is free. To register, call 203-863-4277 or 888-305-9253, or register online.

Also known as osteoarthritis, DJD affects over 30 percent of the US population over age 65 and is characterized by joint pain and stiffness and a progressive loss of mobility. DJD occurs when the cartilage that cushions the joint breaks down and begins to wear away. By 2030, a projected 67 million people will have been diagnosed with DJD. Understanding the latest research on the causes of the disease and the surgical and non-surgical treatment options will be the focus of this seminar. Dr. Paul Sethi, who is also President of the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education, will lead this educational and interactive program.

Greenwich Hospital Mini-Med seminars offers tuition-free monthly programs that focus on basic anatomy and physiology, common disease conditions, and possible cures and treatment options. The series aims to introduce the public to the science of human health and the groundbreaking changes taking place in the field of medicine today. The audience will gain a greater awareness of significant health issues, and about the role of medical research in advancing healthcare. The seminars are presented by Greenwich Hospital staff physicians and are designed to be causal and highly informative. No science or medical background required! Ample time will be given to a question and answer period. Whether you’re a student, teacher, caregiver, healthcare provider, or someone with an interest in research and medicine, you will gain a better understanding of basic terms and medical concepts from the seminars.