Another Award for Dr. Sethi

 

Congratulations to ONS orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Paul Sethi, who has earned the 2018 AAOS Achievement Award again this year from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.  The AAOS Award recognizes members for their active volunteer efforts and their contributions to education, research and advocacy in the profession of orthopedic surgery. Dr. Sethi received this prestigious award in 2017 as well.

A sports medicine, shoulder and knee specialist, Dr. Sethi is also a leading research physician who speaks at academic and instructional medical conferences in the US and abroad. His research on surgical advances for the shoulder, elbow and knee is regularly published in leading medical journals including the Journal for Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, Arthroscopy, and the Journal of American Academy for Orthopaedic Surgery. He also collaborates with outside companies for education and research purposes and to develop medical procedures on the shoulder, elbow and knee. He is a member of the prestigious American Shoulder and Elbow Society and American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons.

As President of the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education,  Dr. Sethi’s research has recently included clinical study of the use of a long lasting analgesic, Exparel, during surgery to reduce the need for opioids to control post-surgical pain; the establishment of better methods for surgical skin preparation (cleaning) to lower the risk of surgical infection; development of a new technique to repair chronic or weakened biceps tendons; and the evaluation of surgical needles in tendon surgery to establish international guidelines on needle use.

The Dangers of Sports Specialization

Every young athlete dreams of the pride and exhilaration of hitting the game winning home run, or scoring the goal that clinches the championship.  In today’s competitive sports environment, youth are under more pressure than ever to train harder and longer to excel in their sport, often with debilitating consequences, writes sports medicine specialist and orthopedic surgeon, Demetris Delos, MD in the latest issue of The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital.Sports Medicine Discussion

The greatest shift in youth sports in the last generation has been the trend toward sports specialization and year-round training. Twenty years ago, young athletes typically played a particular sport only during that sport’s season (i.e. football in the fall, baseball in the spring and summer), and most kids sat out a season or a summer.  Today’s young competitors don’t seem to enjoy that luxury.  Unfortunately, this has also led to a surge of sport specific injuries.

A recent study at the Departments of Kinesiology, Orthopedics and Rehabilitation at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, for instance, found that high school athletes who trained in one sport for more than 8 months were more likely to report a history of overuse knee and hip injuries, than those who had played a variety of sports throughout the year or played sports at less intense levels.

The results of this study reflect what orthopedists have noticed in the last decade with the increasing number of kids showing up in our offices with throwing injuries, torn knee cartilage and stress fractures.

Professional level injuries

 The growing corps of young adolescents and pre-adolescent baseball pitchers is now throwing excessive numbers of pitches during an unusually high number of innings for immature arm muscles. This has led to an epidemic of young athletes suffering ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injuries, requiring the so-called Tommy John Surgery. Tommy John was a left handed pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 1970’s, who was the first baseball player to undergo UCL reconstruction surgery.  His successful recovery and return to achieve a record of 288 career victories.

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears in youth athletes are also increasing at an alarming rate. While ACL tears are not so closely related to a particular sport statistic the way  UCL injuries are tied to pitch count, clearly the rapid rise of sports that involve running and sudden pivoting – think soccer, lacrosse, football, basketball and rugby – increases the likelihood of season ending ACL tears and reconstructive surgery.

Overuse injuries

Unlike ACL injuries, which can be dramatic on-field experiences with players being helped off the field, the vast majority of injuries associated with excessive specialization and training are overuse injuries. Overuse injuries develop slowly over time, starting perhaps as a mild twinge before progressing into relentless, often debilitating pain.  Ironically, these injuries are relatively easy to treat with a period rest and activity modification.  All too often, players, their coaches and, sadly, parents, are often reluctant to have the athlete sit out a few practices and games.  Left untreated, overuse injuries can lead to tears in the muscles and tendons of the affected area, which require a lengthier rehabilitation and sometimes surgery.

Overuse injuries are typically sport specific. In baseball, the upper extremity is most often affected.  With Little league shoulder, the growth place of the humerus (arm bone) becomes inflamed by the repetitive motion of throwing with excessive force.  Similarly, Little league elbow involves injury to the growth plate along the inner portion of the elbow.

In the lower extremity, overuse injuries of the knee and ankle are very common. Osgood Schlatter and Jumper’s knee are injuries to the growth plate of the knee that can be a frustrating source of pain. These injuries are typically associated with repetitive impact activities (running, jumping, etc.) as seen in basketball, soccer and track.  In the ankle, Sever’s disease can lead to pain in the back of the heel.

How can we prevent injuries?

The solution is simple but that doesn’t mean it is easy. Rest and activity modification can be difficult to execute in the middle of the season when the athlete is invested in playing and when parents have already invested much time and money to the sport.

Nevertheless, it is incumbent upon parents to insist their child rest to give the body the opportunity to heal before more serious injury occurs. If a week or two of rest doesn’t resolve the condition, the young athlete should be evaluated by an orthopedist or sports medicine specialist.

Repetitive activities such as throwing or running can lead to changes in the development of growing bones and joints. It has been known for some time now that significant amounts of pitching during adolescence can change the rotation and shape of the shoulder.

Moreover, there is a growing body of evidence indicating certain sports played excessively during adolescence are associated with the development of femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (hip impingement), which can lead to hip problems often requiring surgery in adulthood.

In addition, numerous studies have shown that exposure in youth to a range of different sports that utilize different muscle groups and mechanical skills lead to the greater overall athleticism and better athletes.

Shoulder and Elbow Throwing Injuries Rise for Young Athletes

Surge in Elbow and Shoulder Injuries for Youth Involved in Throwing Activities.

Young male baseball player

For youth involved in repetitive throwing activities, there is an epidemic of elbow and shoulder injuries, usually due to overuse, poor training, improper throwing mechanics, and fatigue, according to sports medicine physician, Demetris Delos, MD, who specializes in shoulder and knee conditions.

The dreaded injury to the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL)  is usually caused by excessive pitching. If the UCL is injured, it can sometimes be difficult to repair or rehabilitate and may require the so-called Tommy John procedure in order to return to competitive pitching. The surgery is named after Tommy John, the first baseball pitcher to undergo successful UCL reconstruction surgery in the 1970’s.

Other common throwing-related injuries include Little League shoulder, which occurs when the growth plate of the humerus (arm bone) becomes inflamed by the excessive forces produced by repetitive throwing. Similarly, Little League elbow involves injury to the growth plate along the inner portion of the elbow.

In addition to acute injuries, repetitive activities such as throwing can lead to physical changes in the development of growing bones and joints. Significant amounts of pitching during adolescence can change the rotation and shape of the shoulder which may leave the player vulnerable to shoulder injury and arthritis in adulthood.

Studies show that children and adolescents who pitch competitively for more than 8 months in a year are the most prone to injury. Throwing more than 80 pitches per game, a fastball that consistently exceeds 85 mph, or pitching while fatigued are also risk factors for injury.

According to one study, pitchers who pitched more than 100 innings in a calendar year were 3.5 times more likely to sustain serious injuries requiring elbow or shoulder surgery or retire due to the injury. This is why USA Baseball and Major League Baseball now recommend that youth pitchers of all ages and abilities take a minimum four month break from overhead throwing, with at least two months off consecutively.

However, athletes and their parents should be reassured that numerous studies have shown that kids who are exposed to a range of sports that utilize different muscle groups and mechanical skills have greater overall success in athletics than those who specialize early on. In addition, they are less prone to injury and burnout than those who focus on a single sport exclusively.

An Added Level of Safety to Young Athletes

The Ortho Access program at ONS offers an added level of safety to young athletes who are injured on the field.

If you missed yesterday’s  Well column in The New York Timesit focused on the lack of national safety standards to protect student athletes from crippling or fatal injuries.  Individual states and theinjured on the field schools within them, for the most part, haven’t yet adopted injury prevention and treatment policies or procedures for children who play organized or league sports either. The responsibility is all too often left to coaches and parents to assess what measures to take when a young athlete is injured and when they can return to play. 500 student athletes died last year due to poor decisions made immediately following injury, according to the article. The ORTHO ACCESS program at ONS is designed to add an extra layer of medical support and injury prevention education for coaches, athletes, and parents. During the first critical moments after a player is hurt,  ONS ORTHO ACCESS sports medicine physicians helps to determine the best immediate course of action to take. Read  more.

 

 

Female Athletes and ACL Injuries

Did you know that female athletes are as much as ten times more likely to suffer an ACL injury than their male counterparts?  

Woman playing tennis at the professional tournamentDifferences in pelvis width, the size of the ACL and the intercondylar notch (where the ACL crosses the knee joint), are all thought to play a role. What’s more, the upper part of a female’s shin bone at the joint is much shorter and more rounded than a male’s, which creates a greater laxity in the joint. Women also tend to have an inward angle to their knees, otherwise known as knocked knees, which places more stress across the outer knee joint and ligaments, particularly when it comes to sudden or extreme movements, such as an abrupt change in direction or pivot. Women also move differently than men. For instance, they tend to land from a jump with their knees in a somewhat straight position, pulling on the quadriceps rather than the hamstrings. Because of this, the force of the impact is transferred to the knee, creating a high risk for an ACL rupture. Men, on the other hand, are better able to absorb the impact because they tend to land with bent knees.

For these reasons, it is crucial for female athletes of all ages to modify their natural biomechanics through neuromuscular training programs that can teach them better ways to move their bodies and protect their knees, said orthopedic surgeon Katie Vadasdi, MD, who heads the Women’s Sports Medicine Center at ONS. “Through neuromuscular training programs, we can help female athletes significantly reduce the risk of ACL ruptures by developing balance between the quadriceps and hamstrings and improving the landing biomechanics with more bent knees and hips to avoid a knock-kneed position on impact.”

Preventing ACL injuries has both near and long term benefits so the sooner you get started with this kind of a conditioning program the better. Studies indicate that there is a tenfold increase in the incidence of osteoarthritis in the knees of women who suffered an ACL injury at some point in their lives. Moreover, injuries that were incurred during youth seem to result in the onset of osteoarthritic symptoms at a much earlier age in adulthood.

Learn more about ACL injuries here.

The Importance of Injury Prevention: Don’t Become a Statistic

Quality of life, activity and productivity are affected by painful orthopedic conditions.

One in two Americans over the age of 18 and nearly three out of four age 65 and older have a musculoskeletal condition costing an estimated $213 billion each year in treatment, cadolori articolari 1re and lost wages, according to a report by the United States Bone and Joint Initiative (USBJI), The Impact of Musculoskeletal Disorders on Americans: Opportunities for Action.

The study finds that the quality of life, activity and productivity of an estimated 126.6 million American adults are affected by painful conditions and disorders affecting the bones, joints and muscles, a number which is comparable to the total percentage of Americans living with chronic lung or heart conditions. Among children, musculoskeletal conditions are surpassed only by respiratory infections as a cause of missed school days.

The report states that arthritis and related conditions top the list of orthopedic ailments (51.8 million adults) followed by back and neck pain (75.7 million combined). With an aging population, the number of people faced with musculoskeletal discomfort can be expected to greatly increase.

Fortunately, advances in diagnostic and treatment technologies, such as those that are available from the sub-specialists at ONS, can provide patients with pain relief and a safe return to mobility. However, the report underscores the importance of injury prevention strategies for individuals of all ages and the need for prompt treatment when injuries occur and orthopedic conditions first appear. With top orthopedists, neurosurgeons, physical therapists and physiatrists, ONS is committed to finding non-surgical options as the first line of treatment. Only 10 percent of ONS patients require surgery.

ONS Featured in Greenwich Sentinel

sentinel_logo_transparentYou can learn about the early days of ONS and the philosophy that made us the most comprehensive and advanced practice the region. The writer, Sara Poirier Correa, did an excellent job explaining that with 22 top sub-specialty trained physicians, ONS is able to provide personalized services to patients. The article also highlights the Women’s Sports Medicine Center and the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education, which has published internationally and competes among researchers at larger universities such as Harvard, Yale, and Johns Hopkins. http://bit.ly/1PNTkfh

 

PRP: A step forward in regenerative medicine

Dr Kessel
Dr. Tamar Kessel, physiatrist, with a C-arm

Dr. Kessel is a physiatrist who specializes in non-operative treatments of musculoskeletal injuries and has an interest in the use of ultrasound to target medications to the precise location of tissue damage. One procedure that optimizes on ultrasound technology is the new and progressive treatment in regenerative medicine, PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma). Utilizing therapeutic injections, like PRP, has been shown to be safer and to greatly improve treatment results.  The treatment has even received significant attention from the media and has been used by members of the New York Giants along with other NFL players and elite athletes. Dr. Kessel is committed to providing the highest quality medical care and achieving the best outcomes for her patients.

PRP is a new treatment in regenerative medicine that uses the patient’s own blood and platelets to promote healing and helps the body optimize on its own natural processes. The patient’s own blood is drawn then placed in a centrifuge machine that separates the blood, leaving the platelet rich plasma ready to be removed. Afterwards, the PRP is placed right into the area of damage using ultrasound. Most people benefit from one injection but depending on the severity of the damage, it could take up to three. This method can help heal injuries including tendon/ligament injuries (Achilles Tendonitis), tennis elbow, cartilage loss, arthritis, and small tears (rotator cuff tears and meniscal injuries).

Note: Because PRP is given in the hopes of optimizing the initial inflammatory response of healing, anti-inflammatory medications should likely be stopped at the time of PRP treatment. Please consult your physician before any procedure.

“Maximizing Your Child’s Athletic Potential” Success

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Dr. Delos with Allan Houston

Last Thursday’s talk on “Maximizing Your Child’s Athletic Potential” was a success. A big thank you goes out to the Junior League of Greenwich for making it possible with their focus on improving the community and empowering others to further health and education! Ultimately they brought together the perfect combination of experts to inform the public about the youth and the sports they love.

Dr. Delos, of ONS and Greenwich Hospital, was a panel speaker at this event. He specializes in sports medicine and arthroscopic treatment of knee and shoulder disorders. Before ONS, Dr. Delos was the Assistant NFL Team Physician for the New York Giants and was team physician for a number of local high school and college athletes.

Other panel members consisted of Andy Barr, Director of Performance and Rehab for the New York Knicks, Mubarak “Bar” Malik, Head of Strength and Conditioning for the New York Knicks, and Allan Houston, one of NBA’s all-time greatest long range shooters and Olympic gold medalist, as the moderator. Each participant reinforced the importance of parents taking interest in the development of their young athlete and properly guiding them to the path of success. Parents attending this event were very attentive, and came prepared with questions.

Conversations covered the fundamental topics, like proper sleep habits and nutrition. For example, a young athlete’s nutrition should increase in relation to the amount of activity they experience daily. This may be common knowledge to an adult but for an adolescent, proper amounts of sleep and good nutrition that balances the amount of activity should be added to their routine.

Aside from the basic topics of discussion, there was a myth to be busted as well; to find out the details of the myth and for more information about the questions that were asked at the event, please read the article written by the Greenwich Freepress.

Delos_Group_2
Photography credit goes to the Delos family, thank you!

ONS Success Story: William McHale

William McHale TestimonialWilliam McHale started off as many other athletes did, full of energy and feeling invincible. As we all know, that feeling of invincibility is only a feeling. In the 7th grade, young William broke his ankle playing football; fortunately he was then referred to Dr. Paul Sethi.

Dr. Sethi considers all of the athlete’s needs which helps set the stage for a successful and timely recovery period and translates into an ideal patient-doctor experience.  When McHale got older, he started as a linebacker in 30 consecutive games between his sophomore and senior years at  Yale University. During his senior year though, the labrums in both of his shoulders tore. Time was of the essence if he wanted to recover in time for his Pro Day in front of NFL Scouts. Who did he contact? None other than our very own Dr. Sethi.

The MRIs originally taken of the injury did not reveal the full extent of the damage but Dr. Sethi corrected all issues encountered during the surgery. After the procedure, William was scheduled to go to physical therapy multiple times a week and overall, it took about six to seven months for a full recovery. Since then, William has not had any other issues regarding his shoulders.

Where is William McHale now? He played to his full potential on Pro Day, was invited to Minicamp with the New Orleans Saints, and just returned from playing football in France; congratulations!

Overuse Injuries: Cause and Effect (Part I)

Cohen headshot for letterGloria Cohen, MD is a specialist in non-operative sports medicine who believes in taking an integrative approach to medical management by considering a patients’ bio-mechanics, cardio-vascular and pulmonary function as it relates to athletic performance. Aside from her impressive medical career, Dr. Cohen is a successful competitive runner who has qualified twice for the New York Marathon and is also an off-road and road cyclist. Her academic insights are a combination of both research and real-world experience, the following article is her most recent commentary on the topic of “overuse injuries”:

What is an “overuse injury”?
An “overuse injury” is an injury that results when excessive stress is applied over a period of time to bones, muscles, tendons, and other supporting soft tissue structures of a particular body part.  This differs from an acute injury which happens quickly and is traumatic in nature. Too much stress to a body part will cause the tissues to break down faster than healing can occur, thereby resulting in an injury. A good analogy would be to consider what happens to a credit card or a piece of metal when you bend it back and forth repetitively – first you see the stress reaction, and then with continued stress the item breaks in two.  As you can appreciate, we want to avoid the latter situation when it comes to the body.

What are some common examples of “overuse injuries”?
Every body part can be affected by an overuse injury.  Some common examples you might be familiar with are: rotator cuff injuries of the shoulder; epicondylitis or tennis elbow; patellofemoral pain syndrome of the knee; and tibial stress syndrome or “shin splints” for the lower leg.  Here are a few case examples of classic overuse syndromes:

Jogging injury.

  1. A 40 year old male has recently increased the intensity and frequency of his swimming activity over the summer months. He now complains of pain in the front of his shoulder with overhead and rotation motion. Diagnosis: Rotator cuff tendinitis
  2. A 30 year old female has been playing tennis daily, now competing in matches at a more difficult level. She complains of increasing soreness in the outside aspect of her elbow. She had tried to play through the pain, but had to stop. She says that she can barely lift a coffee cup now because of the elbow pain. Diagnosis: Tennis Elbow /Lateral epicondylitis
  3. A 20 year college student takes up running during her summer break from school. When she returns to school, she decides to train for a half marathon. As she increases her mileage, and adds speed work to her training program, she develops pain in the inside aspect of one shin. She now complains of pain with just walking. Diagnosis: Shin splints/Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome

What are some of the specific causes of these “overuse injuries”?
As a primary care sports medicine physician I recognize that there are sport specific issues which may contribute to the resulting injury; but there are common “intrinsic” and “extrinsic” factors which play a major role in the development of these types of injuries. “Intrinsic” factors refer to the elements that we cannot control but that we can modify.  These include biomechanical alignment, such as knock knees, bowl legs, flat feet or high arched feet; leg length difference; muscle imbalance; muscle weakness; and lack of flexibility.  These factors can be modified to maximize the individual’s performance, and thereby treat or prevent injury.  An example would be a conditioning program and sport specific training. The “extrinsic factors” include training errors, such as doing “too much too soon”; training surfaces – running on too hard a surface, or playing on an uneven surface; shoes – it is important to wear the appropriate type of shoe for your foot mechanics and the sport; equipment; and environmental conditions. Paying attention to the “extrinsic factors” will help you modify the “intrinsic” ones.

… to be continued in the next segment, Overuse Injuries: Recovery (Part II)

The Fragile Feet: A Ballerina Story (Part I)

Ballerina
Ballerina in en pointe position

Dr. Peden of ONS and Greenwich Hospital is an orthopedic surgeon specializing in foot and ankle surgery and treatments for adult foot conditions as well as youth sports injuries in field athletes, gymnasts and ballet dancers. He shares a two-part blog about conditions to be aware of for ballet dancers and gymnasts.

Ballet dancers feet are much like a musician’s handsthey earn a living with them. In addition to putting an amazing amount of stress on their feet, they also are often well below an ideal body weight – either because of the stress of an enormous amount of training or because of unrealistic expectations placed on them by the ballet community. This leads to several different and often unique foot and ankle conditions.

One fairly unique foot and ankle condition in ballet is caused by the en pointe position. In this position an enormous amount of strain is put on the dancer’s great toe, as it is essentially holding up the entire body weight through a small joint. The main flexor tendon of the toe, called the flexor hallicus longus – normally quite small, takes over the job of the largest tendon in the body, the Achilles. The flexor hallicus longus hypertrophies well in compensation for its new job, but unfortunately this tendon is forced through a tight tunnel in the back of the ankle. When it gets too large it will get pinched in the posterior ankle joint. Patients develop painful irritation of the bones and soft tissues in the posterior ankle. An extra bone in the posterior ankle called the os trigonum, which present in about 10% of all people, can be become very painful and irritated in many ballerinas. This constellation of problems is called posterior impingement of the ankle, and it is noticed by the patient as a vague deep pain in the posterior part of the ankle, in front of the Achilles, that is felt with plantarflexion, the position of pointing the foot and toes downward.

Ballet dancers suffer from numerous other problems of the foot & ankle, many of which are not unique. One of the less glamorous problems they deal with are corns, calluses, and blisters. These are necessary adaptations to allow a high level dancer to compete.

Similar to posterior impingement, which arises from dancers spending an inordinate amount of time and stress in an extreme position at the ankle, ballet dancers will develop anterior impingement at the ankle. This comes from repetitive forceful dorsiflexion – pulling the foot and toes upward, toward the shin. Landing from jumps and deep knee bends exacerbate this problem. Pain is felt in the anterior ankle.

Treatment for the above condition is customized to the patient. Often a minor activity modification, or period of rest, can dramatically improve the symptoms. Unfortunately, rest is not easy to come by in the competitive living of a gymnast. Many dancers will treat the symptoms with a combination of anti-inflammatory medications and occasional steroid injections in the region of maximal tenderness. Surgery is a last resort option for any ballerina – when symptoms persist for many months and are limiting, despite all other efforts. Surgery is typically very successful in these patients and can be done with arthroscopic or minimally invasive techniques.

The most common orthopaedic injury of all is also very common amongst ballet dancers: the lateral (traditional) ankle sprain. The mainstay of treatment for ankle sprains is rest, ice, compression, and elevation – mnemonic RICE. A short period of rest and immobilization (1-2 weeks) is followed by aggressive physical therapy, with strengthening of the muscles that stabilize the ankle. Recent research has pointed to improved short and long-term outcomes when early motion and weight bearing is initiated. There is promising early research on the role of stem cell injections – harvested from the patient’s own blood or bone marrow – in the setting of an acute ankle sprain. This is a technique we will offer for the highest level athletes and dancers in certain situations, understanding that the research data on this intervention is still in development.

… to be continued in the next segment, The Fragile Feet: A Gymnast Story (Part II)

Want to learn even more? Dr. Peden will be giving a seminar on “Solutions for Foot and Ankle Pain: Beyond a Foot Massage.”  The program is free and open to the public. Registration Requested. Call (203) 863-4277 or register online at www.greenhosp.org.

Is tennis your game? Do you love the pace on the squash or paddle court?

RacketSportsTennisWoman If you love racket sports, you might already know what it’s like to experience a rolled ankle or shoulder strain. Injury prevention is the key to staying in the game and ONS is here to help you keep your swing healthy! On Tuesday, May 13th at 6:30 p.m. in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, come hear sports medicine physician Gloria Cohen, MD, orthopedic surgeon Katie Vadasdi, MD, physical therapist Tatyana Kalyuzhny, PT, DPT, MDT and Patrick Hirscht, Tennis Pro, Round Hill Club in Greenwich discuss how to avoid the most common injuries in racket sports like Achilles tendon tears, shoulder and wrist injuries and rolled and sprained ankles. Learn to recognize injury warning signs and know when it’s time to see a doctor. The panel will discuss injury prevention and the latest orthopedic treatments.

Dr. Katie Vadasdi, head of the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center shares her medical expertise and experience in treating these types of injuries saying “racket sports can lead to overuse injuries due to the repetitive motions required in these sports. We most commonly see shoulder and elbow injuries including impingement of the rotator cuff and inflammation of the tendons in the elbow also known as tennis elbow. Early in the season, it is important to gradually increase intensity and duration of play to reduce the risk of developing such overuse injuries. If an athlete develops pain, it is important to rest in order to allow for appropriate recovery.  This can often prevent the development of more serious injuries.  If pain persists in spite of rest, then an athlete should reach out to a medical professional for further diagnosis and management options”.

Come to the seminar to learn more! Seminar is free. Registration requested.

For more information on shoulder injuries/surgery click here!

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit https://onsmd.com/ or call 203.869.1145.

Looks like more snow is in the forecast, we have some skiing tips for you!

skierThe knee is the most vulnerable body part for any athlete, including skiers. Downhill skiing produces large amounts of torque on the knee, challenging the integrity of ligaments and tendons. Whether from a fall or overuse, the most common injuries in skiers are tears to the MCL (Medial Collateral Ligament) or ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament), two important structures that give our knee stability.  When a skier is thrown off balance, his skis will sometimes shoot out in front of him, creating extra torque on the knees and damaging our stabilizing structures.

Both novice and experienced skiers are at risk of hurting their knees. We frequently see novice skiers hurt themselves when they do not know how to turn, stop or fall properly. Taking lessons and working with an instructor goes a long way in preventing knee injuries for beginner skiers. Experienced skiers frequently take risks and assume that they can manage faster speeds on any slope.  Many injuries, whether you are a beginner or an experienced skier, are related to weather conditions. It is important to realize that as visibility and surface conditions deteriorate, the slope or trail level goes up. In poor visibility or icy conditions, a beginner trail becomes an intermediate trail, and an intermediate slope becomes advanced slope. Keep injury prevention in mind, if the conditions are difficult, ski down a level.

A second reason injuries occur is fatigue. Most skiers’ bodies are not accustomed to exercising 6-8 straight hours. In addition, many skiers push their bodies to take advantage of the whole day, even when they start to feel tired and stiff.  For this reason, injuries tend to happen at the end of the day.

Having the knowledge of what places skiers at a higher risk for knee injuries, we are passing on recommendations about how to stay safe on the slopes.  Both beginners and experienced skiers can benefit from these tips!

  1. Start a conditioning program a few months before your first ski trip. Leg strengthening, flexibility and balance are important aspects of an adequate ski conditioning program.
  2. Ski with good technique. Maintain your balance and control, keep your hips above your knees, keep your arms forward, and maintain a safe speed.
  3. Learn how to fall correctly: keep your legs together, keep your chin to your chest and your arms up and forward.
  4. Pay attention to weather conditions and remember to ski down a level if conditions deteriorate.
  5. Listen to your body. If you start to feel pain or stiffness upon exiting the lift chair, then you should probably make that run your last. Head to the lodge and enjoy a warm drink by the fire.

Good luck and stay warm!

If you become injured, while skiing, remember, ONS sports medicine physicians are trained at the top universities and hospitals in the country and have expertise in the latest treatments for sports-related injuries in high-performance and recreational athletes.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit https://onsmd.com/ or call 203.869.1145.

 

Don’t Miss Out! Hurry and Sign Up for The ONS Foundation PLAY Strong, PLAY Safe 5K Race/Walk!

 

ONS_5K_Logo

On Sunday, September 22, the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education PLAY Strong PLAY Safe 5K Run/Walk will take place in Old Greenwich. Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Katie Vadasdi and Joseph “Casey” McKee will serve as event Co-chairs. “It seems only fitting that the ONS Foundation host a 5K race to benefit the organization’s research and education around treatment and prevention of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries,” said Dr. Vadasdi. “What better venue for highlighting the importance of mobility and physical health at any age than a 5K walk/run aimed at the whole family.” Proceeds from the PLAY Strong PLAY Safe 5K will benefit the Foundation’s education initiatives as well as the youth sports programs of the OGRCC. Details about the event and registration are available online at http://www.onsf.org/. Registration packets may be picked up on Saturday, September 21, at OGRCC between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. or on race day between 6 a.m. and 7:30 a.m. Same day registrations are accepted.

The race will begin in front of the OGRCC (Old Greenwich Riverside Community Center) on Harding Road at 8 a.m. on Sunday. The USATF certified 5K course travels through scenic residential areas of Old Greenwich. The course goes south past the Innis Arden Club and is relatively flat for the first 2 miles. Bypassing downtown Old Greenwich, runners and walkers will encounter a hill as they leave the Binney Park area and enter Summit Road. Then, the course runs adjacent to the Riverside School before turning onto Owenoke Way and on to the finish line at the OGRCC.

“The course is designed for all athletic abilities whether you are a serious runner or a power walker,” said Dr. Vadasdi who is also an accomplished triathlete. “We invite elite runners, corporate challenge teams, joggers, student athletes, weekend warriors, power walkers and families to participate.

ONS Foundation 5K Run/Walk Facts

What: ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education Play Strong, Play Safe 5k Run/Walk

When: Sunday, September 22, 2013
Packet Pick Up/Race Day Registration 6 – 7:30 a.m.
5K Start 8 a.m.
Kids 0.5 Mile Costume Run/Walk 9 a.m.

Where: Meet at (OGRCC) Old Greenwich-Riverside Community Center
90 Harding Road, Old Greenwich, CT 06870

Registration details: Register and pick up packets -Saturday, September 21, at OGRCC from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Includes a Race T-Shirt)

Fees:
Adults: $40
Students (12-18 years): $25
Child (8-11 years): $15
Child (7 & younger): FREE

In addition to the race, the event will feature a Health Expo located at the OGRCC where participants and their families will be able to learn more about nutrition, training, injury prevention and running equipment. “We are fortunate to have exhibits from ONS Physical Therapy, EHS PT, Greenwich Running Company and Green and Tonic,” said “Casey” McKee. “ONS doctors will also be on hand to host clinics on injury prevention and management”.

Sponsors for the ONS Foundation 5K include Greenwich Hospital Fairway Market, Elite Health Services, Greenwich Running Co., Jeep, Green and Tonic, Johnnie-O, and the Greenwich United Way. For information and online registration, go to http://www.ons-foundation.org/

The ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education, a Greenwich Hospital alliance, works to develop, validate, formalize and disseminate the latest advances in surgical techniques, rehabilitation protocols and clinical outcomes in orthopedics and neurosurgery to improve patient care on regional and national levels.