Regenerative Medicine Seminar

Stem cell therapy. Super PRP. The future of medicine is now! Expert Dr. Tim Greene will discuss the latest biologic treatments that augment the body’s own natural healing powers to repair, and Stem Cell Therapyin some cases, regrow damaged cartilage and tissue. Q & A will follow.  FREE.  Please register by calling 888-305-9253 or online

WHEN:  Wednesday, October 10

TIME:  6:00 – 8:30 PM

PLACE:
Greenwich Hospital
Noble Auditorium
5 Perryridge Road
Greenwich, CT 06830

ONS Physician … Compassionate to the Bone

Dr. Alex Levchenko is featured in the September 2018 issue of the Westchester WAG magazine article called Compassionate to the Bone.   In the piece, writer Phil Hall covers a lot of territory, Alex Levchenko, MDfrom Dr. Levchenko’s specialty in physiatry, the difference between an MD, medical doctor, and DO,, doctor of osteopathic medicine – Dr. Levchenko is the latter,and the dangers in youth sports specialization to the ONS practice-wide commitment to compassionate care.

“Our practice prides itself on being compassionate,” Dr. Levchenko says. “We run on time, so patients don’t come and wait for hours. We think compassionate care is the key. We look at you as a human being and not just a part of the body.”

Hill also describes the genesis in Dr. Levchenko’s interest in medicine, writing:

Levchenko’s interest in all things medical took root during his childhood in Soviet Russia. “My parents were teachers,” he recalls. “My mom was teaching high school biology and my dad was teaching music. We had a huge library at home. From the time I was a kid I was always interested in that. By the age of 12, I covered the whole high school curriculum. We were given an assignment at school to write about who we want to be. I decided medicine would be the best route for me. The older I got, I knew that is what I wanted to be.”

In 1994, the 19-year-old Levchenko had the opportunity to pursue medical studies in the U.S. He was grateful to pursue studies away from the political upheaval that followed the collapse of the Soviet system and Boris Yeltsin’s raucous presidency.

“It was an interesting time — a turbulent time in Russia,” he says. “I was lucky to be presented with an opportunity to come here.”

Levchenko attended college at New York University and medical school at New York College of Osteopathic Medicine in Old Westbury. His residency took place in the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department at New York University Langone Medical Center and his fellowship in the Orthopaedic Sports and Spine Rehabilitation Department of Mount Sinai Hospital.

Read the entire article.

Regenerative Medicine and Chronic Pain

IS REGENERATIVE MEDICINE THE ANSWER TO YOUR CHRONIC PAIN? 

In the past, most cases of damaged tissue within the body were considered irreversible, but developments in regenerative medicine hold the potential to change all that, writes Christopher Sahler, PRPMD, an interventional pain management specialist at ONS, in this week’s edition of the Greenwich Sentinel.  Although research into harnessing the body’s own healing process using amniotic fluids, blood, tissues, growth factors and stem cells is ongoing, certain biomedical therapies are in use today to help ordinary people suffering from orthopedic conditions and chronic pain.  The most common treatment, using platelet rich plasma collected from a patient’s own blood, is administered in a physician’s office using ultrasound guided injections directly into the diseased or damaged tissue to restart and increase the healing process.  Read the full article in the April 1 edition of Greenwich Sentinel.

Platelet Rich Plasma works for active Greenwich Mom

Lynn Surprenant of Greenwich is an athletic 51-year-old mother of two,

Lynn Surprenant
Lynn Surprenant was treated with PRP injection therapy

who has enjoyed sailing, skiing, golf and other sports over the course of her life. Two years ago she developed painful tendinitis in her left elbow. It got better after resting it over the winter and then reoccurred after she went kayaking during a winter vacation.  Her elbow became so painful that even picking up a glass of water was excruciating.

The following June, Dr. Seth Miller gave her a cortisone injection into the joint which brought her initial relief. Unfortunately, the benefit wore off after about eight weeks. When she returned to Dr. Miller, he suggested she try a new treatment option called PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma). Although not FDA approved, the treatment is increasingly being used by orthopedic surgeons and physiatrists to treat soft tissue problems such as tennis elbow, hamstring strains, MCL strains and patellar tendonitis. Continue reading “Platelet Rich Plasma works for active Greenwich Mom”