ONS Physiatrist, Christopher Sahler, MD presents “Exercise as Treatment for Chronic Pain”

Christopher Sahler, MD
Christopher Sahler, MD

Christopher Sahler, MD of ONS and Greenwich Hospital, is an interventional physiatrist specializing in sports medicine. His focus is non-operative treatment of musculoskeletal injuries, restoring proper function, reducing pain and promoting active lifestyles.

If you are suffering from chronic pain, you are not alone. It is estimated that 100 million Americans are currently living with chronic pain. The pain may make it difficult just to get out of bed or do household chores, let alone be active and exercise. Studies have shown this inactivity can actually cause you to experience a worsened level of pain and for a longer period of time. Exercise actually improves your pain threshold. Even simple exercises such as walking can provide some benefit.

Join Dr. Sahler as he presents his first health Seminar “Exercise as Treatment for Chronic Pain” at Greenwich Hospital. Come learn how staying active and performing exercise may help treat an array of chronic pain conditions.

When: December 2nd, 2014
Time: 6:00 p.m.
Place: Noble Auditorium at Greenwich Hospital

The program is free and open to the public. Registration Requested.
Call (203) 863-4277 or register online at www.greenhosp.org.

ONS Physiatrist, Christopher Sahler, MD on post New York City Marathon Tips for Runners

Christopher Sahler, MD
Christopher Sahler, MD

Christopher S. Sahler, MD of ONS is an interventional physiatrists specializing in sports medicine. His focus is non-operative treatment of musculoskeletal injuries, restoring proper function, reducing pain and promoting active lifestyles.

“Each year 50,000 people participate in the NYC marathon. If you are in that group and completed the race this past weekend, congratulations! It is an exciting accomplishment that you will remember for the rest of your life.

Now that the race is over, there are a few key points to remember that will help to maximize your recovery and minimize pain. Many athletes experience worsening soreness over the following days after the race. This is known as delayed onset muscle soreness and typically is most painful 48-72 hours later. After the race, your body is in a depleted state so it is important to take in plenty of water and healthy food. A combination of complex carbohydrates and protein help the muscles to repair themselves and re-build their energy stores. It is also recommended that you perform light, short duration activities such as walking, gentle jogging, biking, swimming etc. This helps to increase blood flow to the muscles and tissues that need the nutrients the most and helps to wash away the built up metabolic byproducts such as lactic acid. Gentle stretching and soaking in a warm bath may also help loosen up the muscles. Depending on your previous activity level, it is important to give your body time off before re-starting any intense exercise routines. Most runners should take at least one month off.

Congratulations again on the race!”

Dr. Sahler will present “Exercise as Treatment for Chronic Pain.” Learn how exercise can be used as a safe and effective treatment for chronic pain conditions. This free health seminar will be in the Noble Conference room at Greenwich Hospital Tuesday, December 2 at 6:00 p.m.  To register call 203-863-4277 or register online at https://www.greenhosp.org/CREG/ClassDetails.aspx?sid=1&ClassID=5348