Focus on Ski Conditioning to Prevent Injury at ONS Foundation Seminar

“DON’T WAIT FOR THE SNOW TO START FALLING TO PREPARE YOUR BODY FOR THE SKI SEASON,” SAYS ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON DR. STEVEN HINDMAN OF THE ONS FOUNDATION FOR CLINICAL RESEARCH AND EDUCATION. “THE SOONER YOU START A CONDITIONING PROGRAM, THE BETTER.”

As further impetus, the ONS Foundation is holding its annual Ski Conditioning and Injury Prevention Seminar on Tuesday, December 7 at 6:30 p.m. at ONS building, 6 Greenwich Office Park at 10 Valley Drive.  Dr. Hindman and orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist Dr. Tim Greene will discuss the causes of common skiing injuries and how they may be avoided. The free seminar will include tips on safe skiing, and information on the latest treatments for common injuries such as a ruptured ACL. Chalon Lefebvre, PT of ONS Physical Therapy will talk about and demonstrate ski conditioning and strengthening exercises. Registration is requested. Call 203-869-3131 or email contact@ons-foundation.org to register or for information.

Each year eager skiers and snowboarders head to the slopes but many do little to prepare for the physical demands of their sport. Even the best of athletes are susceptible to injury when under-prepared muscles engage in winter sports activity for the first time in many months. Physical conditioning can make all the difference.

According to Dr. Hindman, there is a lot that can be done to avoid the common aches and more serious strains to joints and muscles that many experience. “Most people go from their car to the ski lift without even a single stretch,” says Hindman. “Skiing requires muscles and muscle groups that are used very little the rest of the year. Ideally, strengthening and conditioning should begin two to three months before the first trip up the mountain, but it’s never too late to benefit from a program. Find one that’s geared to winter mountain sports. If you don’t prepare, your risk for injury increases.”

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What does Board Certified Specialist mean?

If you need surgery for an injury or condition, first do some investigating to make sure you’re in the best possible hands. Ask if the doctor is “board certified” and find out, which board. Then verify that it’s recommended by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS).  Certification by an ABMS Member Board involves a rigorous process of testing and peer evaluation that is designed and administered by specialists in the specific area of medicine. Members are leaders in their field because they voluntarily participate in lifelong learning to keep their skills and knowledge current. They demonstrate their commitment to quality clinical outcomes, patient safety and a responsive, patient-centered practice through participation in a continuous Maintenance of Certification program. There are boards that are invented to sound prestigious. If a doctor isn’t certified by a board that’s recognized by the ABMS, find another physician.

If your doctor purports to be an orthopedic specialist, he or she ought to be a member of The American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery. That’s the only board recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties to certify orthopedic surgery.  Within that field, physicians may be further specialized in one area of the body or another, like shoulder, hand and wrist or foot and ankle; or in a type of procedure like arthroscopy or joint replacement.  This specialization is what’s meant by fellowship training. If your doctor says he or she is fellowship trained, ask what the training was in and where he or she did their training. Fellowship training indicates that once a fully credentialed physician, the doctor has received additional training in a particular discipline.  While this certification doesn’t guarantee that he’s the best physician, it does guarantee an extra level of training and experience.  During Fellowship training, surgeons often perform hundreds of procedures to hone their skills.

Spine Surgery Seminar at Greenwich Hospital – Tonight

Neurosurgeon Scott Simon, MD will speak on Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery

Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery (MISS) – What makes it better than open surgery?

On Wednesday, March 31 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education will present a talk at Greenwich Hospital on Why Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery (MISS) is better than open surgery? Continue reading “Spine Surgery Seminar at Greenwich Hospital – Tonight”