Collaborative Solutions for Safety in Sport 2015

Gloria Cohen, MD
Gloria Cohen, MD

ONS specialists are on a mission to spread the word about health! Gloria Cohen, MD participated in the first Collaborative Solutions for Safety in Sport Meeting at the NFL Headquarters in New York City on March 26-27 with more than 20 other members of the AMSSM (American Medical Society for Sports Medicine); an organization of sports medicine physicians in multiple fields dedicated to education, research, and advocacy.

The meeting was strongly influenced by the “2013 Inter-Association Task Force for Preventing Sudden Death in Secondary School Athletic Programs: Best Practice Recommendations” giving it a focus on safety and health issues at the secondary sports level. Speakers encouraged best practices and protocols and this fit perfectly with Cohen’s belief in a comprehensive approach to prevention and treatment of injury. They concerned the establishment with heat-related illnesses, cardiac conditions (use of AEDs), head and neck injuries and the overarching need for emergency action plans in all high schools. ONS would like to thank the participants for understanding how important preventative care is.

Aside from the talk Dr. Cohen is not only a recognized authority in sports medicine, she is a successful competitive runner who has qualified twice for the New York Marathon. She has also held the title as head team physician for the Canadian National Olympic Cycling Team for 14 years while still enjoying off-road and road cycling herself. All in all, we are incredibly proud to have her on our team.

Overuse Injuries: Recovery Time (Part II)

Elbow_Pain_WebRemember last week’s post? Dr.Cohen’s knowledge of “overuse injuries” does not stop at what causes the condition; she has valuable insight on the treatment and prevention as well.

The Mystery is in the History
Careful history taking and examination helps the sports medicine physician diagnose the condition. It is helpful to know what maneuver produces the pain; or when the pain occurs. Many times with an overuse the injury the symptoms will first occur after the activity; then earlier and earlier into the activity until you become symptomatic at rest. It is important to seek medical attention long before that occurs. It is not normal to have pain with the activity. It is important to consult a physician regarding your symptoms, and to find the cause of the injury so that re-injury does not occur once the present injury is treated.

What are the treatment principles for Overuse Injuries?
Management of the condition depends on the severity. Relative rest, which is stopping the aggravating activity while maintaining cardiovascular activity with another activity is one aspect of the treatment program. For example, use of a stationary bicycle or elliptical, or swimming, which are nonimpact activities, might be an alternate activity for a runner while the injury is healing. One needs to individualize the modified activity for the patient and their injury. Other aspects of the treatment plan are pain management with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication as indicated if no contraindication; physical therapy to include instruction in stretching and strengthening exercises; use of an appropriate brace or support for the injured body part; correction of predisposing factors; and modification of biomechanics.

Are there some injury prevention guidelines?
We would all like to prevent an injury from occurring and to maximize our athletic endeavors. Some key points to remember to help get you there are: appropriate training and conditioning for the sport; check your biomechanics for the sport; allow for adequate recovery and do not engage in your sport when you are tired or in pain. Engage in a variety of sports and activities so that you are not always using the same muscles in the same way. Many elite level athletes complement their specialized sport training with another sport. For example, a cyclist might skate or play hockey in the off season to maintain muscle balance of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles of the thigh. It is best to be proactive and prevent the injury from happening.

Dr.Cohen will be discussing Stress Fractures and Biomechanical assessment in future blogs.

Overuse Injuries: Cause and Effect (Part I)

Cohen headshot for letterGloria Cohen, MD is a specialist in non-operative sports medicine who believes in taking an integrative approach to medical management by considering a patients’ bio-mechanics, cardio-vascular and pulmonary function as it relates to athletic performance. Aside from her impressive medical career, Dr. Cohen is a successful competitive runner who has qualified twice for the New York Marathon and is also an off-road and road cyclist. Her academic insights are a combination of both research and real-world experience, the following article is her most recent commentary on the topic of “overuse injuries”:

What is an “overuse injury”?
An “overuse injury” is an injury that results when excessive stress is applied over a period of time to bones, muscles, tendons, and other supporting soft tissue structures of a particular body part.  This differs from an acute injury which happens quickly and is traumatic in nature. Too much stress to a body part will cause the tissues to break down faster than healing can occur, thereby resulting in an injury. A good analogy would be to consider what happens to a credit card or a piece of metal when you bend it back and forth repetitively – first you see the stress reaction, and then with continued stress the item breaks in two.  As you can appreciate, we want to avoid the latter situation when it comes to the body.

What are some common examples of “overuse injuries”?
Every body part can be affected by an overuse injury.  Some common examples you might be familiar with are: rotator cuff injuries of the shoulder; epicondylitis or tennis elbow; patellofemoral pain syndrome of the knee; and tibial stress syndrome or “shin splints” for the lower leg.  Here are a few case examples of classic overuse syndromes:

Jogging injury.

  1. A 40 year old male has recently increased the intensity and frequency of his swimming activity over the summer months. He now complains of pain in the front of his shoulder with overhead and rotation motion. Diagnosis: Rotator cuff tendinitis
  2. A 30 year old female has been playing tennis daily, now competing in matches at a more difficult level. She complains of increasing soreness in the outside aspect of her elbow. She had tried to play through the pain, but had to stop. She says that she can barely lift a coffee cup now because of the elbow pain. Diagnosis: Tennis Elbow /Lateral epicondylitis
  3. A 20 year college student takes up running during her summer break from school. When she returns to school, she decides to train for a half marathon. As she increases her mileage, and adds speed work to her training program, she develops pain in the inside aspect of one shin. She now complains of pain with just walking. Diagnosis: Shin splints/Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome

What are some of the specific causes of these “overuse injuries”?
As a primary care sports medicine physician I recognize that there are sport specific issues which may contribute to the resulting injury; but there are common “intrinsic” and “extrinsic” factors which play a major role in the development of these types of injuries. “Intrinsic” factors refer to the elements that we cannot control but that we can modify.  These include biomechanical alignment, such as knock knees, bowl legs, flat feet or high arched feet; leg length difference; muscle imbalance; muscle weakness; and lack of flexibility.  These factors can be modified to maximize the individual’s performance, and thereby treat or prevent injury.  An example would be a conditioning program and sport specific training. The “extrinsic factors” include training errors, such as doing “too much too soon”; training surfaces – running on too hard a surface, or playing on an uneven surface; shoes – it is important to wear the appropriate type of shoe for your foot mechanics and the sport; equipment; and environmental conditions. Paying attention to the “extrinsic factors” will help you modify the “intrinsic” ones.

… to be continued in the next segment, Overuse Injuries: Recovery (Part II)

Is tennis your game? Do you love the pace on the squash or paddle court?

RacketSportsTennisWoman If you love racket sports, you might already know what it’s like to experience a rolled ankle or shoulder strain. Injury prevention is the key to staying in the game and ONS is here to help you keep your swing healthy! On Tuesday, May 13th at 6:30 p.m. in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, come hear sports medicine physician Gloria Cohen, MD, orthopedic surgeon Katie Vadasdi, MD, physical therapist Tatyana Kalyuzhny, PT, DPT, MDT and Patrick Hirscht, Tennis Pro, Round Hill Club in Greenwich discuss how to avoid the most common injuries in racket sports like Achilles tendon tears, shoulder and wrist injuries and rolled and sprained ankles. Learn to recognize injury warning signs and know when it’s time to see a doctor. The panel will discuss injury prevention and the latest orthopedic treatments.

Dr. Katie Vadasdi, head of the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center shares her medical expertise and experience in treating these types of injuries saying “racket sports can lead to overuse injuries due to the repetitive motions required in these sports. We most commonly see shoulder and elbow injuries including impingement of the rotator cuff and inflammation of the tendons in the elbow also known as tennis elbow. Early in the season, it is important to gradually increase intensity and duration of play to reduce the risk of developing such overuse injuries. If an athlete develops pain, it is important to rest in order to allow for appropriate recovery.  This can often prevent the development of more serious injuries.  If pain persists in spite of rest, then an athlete should reach out to a medical professional for further diagnosis and management options”.

Come to the seminar to learn more! Seminar is free. Registration requested.

For more information on shoulder injuries/surgery click here!

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit https://onsmd.com/ or call 203.869.1145.

ONS Sports Medicine Specialist, Gloria Cohen, MD on Cycling Injuries

GloriaCohenbikingWEB_SMLike all activities engaged in regularly, cycling has its share of common ailments and injuries.  Many of the overuse injuries result from attempting to do too much, too soon. Poor riding technique, and improper frame fit for the individual may also cause injuries. Riding too many miles or tackling too many hills in too high a gear will stress the musculoskeletal system, especially at the start of the cycling season.

Knee pain is the most common complaint and is usually related to the tracking of the kneecap, or “patella” in the mid-groove of the thigh bone or “femur.”  The symptoms of “biker’s knee,” also known as “patellofemoral pain syndrome,” usually result from a combination of malalignment of the extensor mechanism of the knee, muscle imbalance, and improper set-up on the bike.  Each cyclist presents with differences in biomechanics (flat pronated feet, bow legs, etc.) and muscle conditioning (strength and flexibility) that can predispose to this condition.  It is important to avoid riding with high pedal resistance at a low cadence as this puts excessive pressure across the knee joint. The rule of the road is “if the knees hurt gear down.”

Some common riding errors are riding with the saddle too low or too far forward and poor foot position or improper cleat adjustment.  This can lead to other musculoskeletal injuries such as neck problems, or Achilles tendinitis.

We must not forget that traumatic injuries can occur when we least expect it. Wear an approved bicycle helmet at all times while cycling. Remember to replace your helmet if you are involved in a bike crash while wearing it. It will likely not perform for you the second time.

Gloria Cohen, MD is a specialist in non-operative sports medicine. She is a primary care team physician for the Columbia University varsity athletic teams and lecturer in the Department of Orthopaedics at Columbia University and served as team physician to the Canadian National Olympic Cycling Team for 14 years and was a member of the Canadian Medical Team for the Olympic Games in Seoul, Atlanta, and Sydney. She travels regularly with the Columbia University varsity football team, the Lions and is recognized as an authority in sports medicine in the United States and Canada.

Dr. Cohen believes in taking an integrative approach to medical management by considering a patients’ bio-mechanics, cardio-vascular and pulmonary function as it relates to athletic performance. Dr. Cohen is a successful competitive runner who has qualified twice for the New York Marathon. She is also an off-road and road cyclist and will be a featured speaker at Cycle Strong! A Sports Conditioning and Injury Prevention Workshop for Cycling Enthusiasts! This event is presented by ONS Foundation for Clinical Research, Inc. and sponsored by the North Castle Library, Armonk. For more information visit the ONS Foundation website.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit https://onsmd.com/ or call 203.869.1145.

Calendar of Health Information Programs by ONS Physicians at Greenwich Hospital

PROGRAMS CALENDAR 2014

This year the physicians at ONS will present health information seminars for the public on a variety of topics ranging from joint replacement to common soccer injuries, injury prevention and treatments. Sessions to take place in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich, and followed by a question and answer period where the public may pose questions to the presenters. To register for upcoming ONS programs at Greenwich Hospital, please call (203) 863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register on-line at http://www.greenhosp.org/.

2 APRIL 2014 – Joint Symposium, Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich <read more>

Past Topics

Knee Pain Seminar

Chichi_knee anatomy
For millions of Americans, knee pain is a daily reality. Many people try to ignore pain caused by arthritis in the knee joint for as long as possible in hopes that it will go away. However, arthritis is a progressive disease and for many, will even become debilitating. On December 3, 2013, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Demetris Delos presented a “Knee Pain Seminar” addressing treatment options for knee pain due to early-stage arthritis. He discussed non-operative and operative solutions from therapeutic injections, arthroscopic procedures to osteotomy and partial knee replacement. The seminar was free and open to the public.

Speaker: Orthopedic Surgeon Demetris Delos, MD

ONS is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice serving patients throughout Fairfield and Westchester Counties and the New York Metropolitan area. ONS physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com, or call (203) 869-1145.

Osteoporosis: Prevention, Treatment and Managementgraphic

Osteoporosis, a disease that weakens the bones and leads to fractures, affects 28 million Americans and contributes to an estimated 1.5 million bone fractures every year. Half of all women older than 65 and one in five men is affected by osteoporosis. On Wednesday, October 23, 2013 at 6:30 pm, physicians with ONS and Greenwich Hospital hosted a seminar on Osteoporosis: Prevention, Treatment and Management. The public was invited to hear from medical experts what measures may be taken to prevent bone loss or minimize its effects. Presenters included Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Endocrinologist Ranee Lleva, MD, and Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter. The program took place in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road and was free of charge. To register for ONS programs at Greenwich Hospital, please call (203) 863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register on-line at www.greenhosp.org. For more information on topics related to orthopedics, visit www.onsmd.com

Speakers: Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Endocrinologist Ranee Lleva, MD, and Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter. Wednesday, October 23, 6:30-8 pm

Cartilage Transplantation Offers New Hope for Damaged Knees

Delos Office Vertical
Dr. Demetris Delos

Cartilage transplantation offers exciting new treatment options for adults under the age of 50 who have had their knee damaged through acute or chronic trauma to the knee. The surgeon uses small cylindrical plugs of good cartilage and inserts them into the damaged areas. This procedure has been shown to be highly effective in patients who have sustained a specific injury to the knee cartilage or joint lining, and who have not yet developed arthritis. Many competitive athletes who have undergone the treatment have returned to their full performance level after surgery.

Speaker: Orthopaedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist Demetris Delos, MD

Women’s Sports Medicine Center forum at Greenwich Hospital

WSMC group photo cu

Who would know better how to treat active women of all ages and levels of sports activity than the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center physician and physical therapy team?

In addition to being experts in their fields as orthopedic surgeons and sports medicine specialists, the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center team is comprised of current and former athletes and fitness enthusiasts who know first-hand what it takes to train and excel in a sport. (In fact, Dr. Katie Vadasdi, an orthopedic surgeon, is an accomplished tri-athlete who has completed two Ironman competitions, is an alpine climber and has ascended Mount Kilimanjaro, Mount Rainier and the Grand Teton.)

Come hear the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center panel discussion hosted by Greenwich Hospital:

“Women Treating Women”

The event, which took place in the Noble Conference Room at Greenwich Hospital, featured the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine experts in a panel discussion regarding the latest diagnostic and medical management techniques for injuries and conditions common in female athletes.

The public was invited to bring their sports injury or fitness-related questions and get answers from a team of physicians who have provided medical support to five Olympic Games, international biking and fencing championships, and medical coverage for the Columbia University sports teams and Greenwich High School sports.

Women’s Sports Medicine Panel:

Katie Vadasdi, MD, Orthopedic Surgeon, Sports Medicine Specialist Fellowship Training: Columbia University Medical Center

Gloria Cohen, MD, Primary Care Sports Medicine, Olympic Team Physician Post Graduate Sports Medicine, University of British Columbia

Tamar Kessel, MD, Physiatrist, Interventional Sports and Spine Fellowship Training: Hospital for Special Surgery

Laura Liebesman, PT, Director of ONS Physical Therapy Specialties- Golf mechanics, Orthopedics and Spine PT Certification – University of Pennsylvania

 

ONS Launches Women’s Sports Medicine Center

WSMC group photo cu
Women’s Sports Medicine Panel

ONS is pleased to announce the opening of the Women’s Sports Medicine Center. The physician and physical therapy team—Katie Vadasdi, MD (Orthopedic Surgeon, Sports Medicine Specialist), Gloria Cohen, MD (Primary Care Sports Medicine Physician, Olympic team physician), Tamar Kessel, MD (Physiatrist, Interventional Sports and Spine) and Laura Liebesman, PT (Director of ONS Physical Therapy with PT specialties in golf mechanics, orthopedics and spine)—treats active women of all ages and levels of sports activity through a multidisciplinary and coordinated approach. In addition to being experts in their fields, the team consists of current and former athletes and fitness enthusiasts who know first-hand what it takes to train and excel in a sport.

“The Women’s Sports Medicine Center at ONS is about women treating women,” said
Dr. Vadasdi, an accomplished tri-athlete who has completed two Ironman competitions, is an alpine climber and has ascended Mount Kilimanjaro, Mount Rainier and the Grand Teton.

“We are female athletes and health care professionals, and we understand that female athletes have specific needs,” Vadasdi continued. “We gear our multi-disciplinary approach to address injury prevention and treatment, as well as health maintenance.”

The ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center specializes in the medical team concept to provide diagnoses for acute, sub-acute and chronic sports-related musculoskeletal complaints, including shoulder instability, rotator cuff tears, tennis/golf elbow, hip impingement, knee injuries, tendonitis, concussions, stress fractures and musical sprains and strains. The Center will also act as an advisory resource for women’s sports teams and treatments for individual players.

Katie Vadasdi, MD, Gloria Cohen, MD, Tamar Kessel, MD and Laura Liebesman, PT are available to speak at women’s organizations and wellness events, conferences, specialized clubs (e.g., running, swimming and figure-skating) and community centers. Selected topics include “Female Athlete Triad,” “Shin Splints and Stress Fractures,” “Injury and Prevention for the Female Cyclist,” “Exercise in Pregnancy and Postpartum,” “Dance Injuries: Readiness for Pointe,” “ACL Injury Prevention for Athletes” and “Back Pain and Spinal Stress Injuries.”

On Tuesday, November 5 at 6:30 p.m., Greenwich Hospitalwill host a Women’s Sports Medicine Forum, “Women Treating Women.” The event, which takes place in the Noble Conference Room, will feature the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine experts in a panel discussion regarding the latest diagnostic and medical management techniques for injuries and conditions common in female athletes.

The public is invited to bring their sports injury or fitness-related questions and get answers from a team of physicians who have provided medical support to five Olympic Games, international biking and fencing championships, and medical coverage for the Columbia University sports teams and Greenwich High School sports.

ONS is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice serving patients throughout Fairfield and Westchester Counties and the New York Metropolitan area. ONS physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com, or call (203) 869-1145

 

Dr. Gloria Cohen to Participate on Local Women’s Cycling Information Panel

Signature Cycles to Host Women’s Cycling Networking Night on April 4

What should I eat before a ride? Why does my saddle hurt? I think I want to race but how do I get started?  Cycling can be an intimidating activity for many women, but Signature Cycles, a local bike studio located at 14 Railroad Avenue, Greenwich, CT will provide answers these and many other questions during its special women’s-only “Ladies Night: Women in the Know” information panel and networking event on April 4 at 6 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Signiture Cycles Panelist Dr. Gloria Cohen.
Signature Cycles Panelist Dr. Gloria Cohen.

Women of all levels of experience and abilities are invited to attend the event. Topics will include women’s health, injury prevention, gear, competitive racing, and more.

ONS sports medicine physician, Gloria Cohen, MD has been invited to participate on the panel. Dr. Cohen is a specialist in non-operative sports medicine. She serves as a primary care team physician for the Columbia University varsity athletic teams and lecturer in the Department of Orthopaedics at Columbia University. She served as team physician to the Canadian National Olympic Cycling Team for 14 years and was a member of the Canadian Medical Team for the Olympic Games in Seoul, Atlanta, and Sydney.

Dr. Cohen believes in taking an integrative approach to medical management by considering a patients’ bio-mechanics, cardio-vascular and pulmonary function as it relates to athletic performance. She is a competitive runner who has qualified twice for the New York Marathon and is also an off-road and road cyclist.

“Ladies Night: Women in the Know” panelists :

Ann IvanUSAT Level 1 Coach, Rye YMCA Fitness Center Director, Age Group Triathlete, 2-Time Ironman Finisher, Cancer Survivor

Carrie Goldkopf – Personal Trainer, Certified Massage Therapist, Nutrition Counselor, Avid Mountain Bike Enthusiast

Clare Zecher – USAT Level 1 Certified Coach, Personal Trainer, USAT Team USA Qualification, Multi time Marathon Competitor

Genevieve X. Boulanger Owner and Founder of GXB Yoga and Pilates. Certified Pilates and Yoga Instructor

Gloria C. Cohen, MD Specialist in Non-Operative Sports Medicine. Team Physician for Columbia University Varsity Athletic Teams. Former Team Physician to the Canadian National Cycling Team and Canadian Olympic Games Medical Team

Lucia DengCo-Captain of the Rockstar/ Signature Cycles Womens Racing Team,Board of Directors of Century Road Club Association

Madeleine Marecki – Member of Rockstar/Signature Cycles Womens Racing Team, Former Division 1 Cross Country and Track Athlete

Melissa Moo Harkins Founder of MooMotion Apparel, 3-Time Ironman Finisher, Alumni of Parsons School of Design

The event will include food, drink, and great giveaways. This is an evening not to be missed! Reservations can be made by emailing lori@signaturecycles.com.

Signature Cycles (www.signaturecycles.com) is a high-end bicycle studio with locations in Greenwich, New York City, and Central Valley, NY. Our client experience is focused on discovering the specific needs, goals and limitations of each individual athlete, thereby creating a path to fulfill their cycling dreams.

ONS Foundation to present Parenting a Healthy Dancer Workshop at Ballet School

Most injuries in dancers, for both students and professionals, are not the result of a sudden or traumatic event but  usually occur over a period of time, and are often preventable.  With that in mind, on Tuesday, September 20 at 6:30 p.m., The Ballet School of Stamford and the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education will team up to present a FREE injury prevention workshop for parents of dancers. Parenting a Healthy Dancer will feature a panel of experts who will discuss how to keep young dancers healthy in mind and body.  The panel will include Sports Medicine Physician Dr. Gloria Cohen, Dance Physical Therapist Samara DiMattia MSPT and Psychotherapist Becca Gaines, MS PC.

Because dance training involves repetitive movements done in classes, rehearsals, and performances, a lot of stress is put on dancers’ ligaments and muscles. Over time, this repetitive activity can lead to a number of overuse injuries.

The program, which is hosted by The Ballet School of Stamford at 175 Atlantic Street, will highlight the importance of understanding the signs and symptoms of the most common dance injuries including tendinitis, snapping hip, foot stress injuries, sprained ankles, and low back pain. “The panel will discuss the physical and emotional challenges for the young dancer,” said Dr. Cohen. “We will talk about the importance of proper technique and of identifying any muscle imbalances in the young dancer that might lead to an injury. There will also be discussion on proper strengthening and stretching exercises that can prevent injuries, basic rehabilitation exercises for dancers recovering from an injury, and how to know when to see a professional about a condition.” The FREE workshop will be conducted in an open forum. The public is invited, however advance registration is requested. For information, or to register, please send an email to info@Balletschoolofstamford.org, or call 203-358-8853. For directions go to www.balletschoolofstamford.org.

The Ballet School of Stamford is a not-for-profit school that provides professional dance training for children and adults from Fairfield and Westchester counties. The school is entering its thirteenth year and has moved into its new home at Old Town Hall. Through its relationship with Stamford Center for the Arts, the Ballet School is able to provide unique performance opportunities for its students, with a varied repertoire of original productions and classical ballets.

Returning to Spring Sports- Take it Slow

If you have been less active over the winter months and now can’t wait to get back into your exercise routine, a word of caution– take it slow to avoid early season injuries. Don’t try to pick up where you left off last fall. Build up your work out gradually.

Christina Hennessy from Greenwich Time and The Advocate has written an article, Spring Shape up, that offers some good advice, some of which comes from ONS’ Gloria Cohen, MD and Laura Liebesman, PT.

Below is our own list of tips for safe return to sports activity

• Practice a regular strengthening and flexibility program, remembering to balance opposing muscle groups.

• Warm up before every workout or sports activity.

• Wear appropriate footgear and do not use worn-out running or tennis shoes that can negatively affect biomechanics.

• When returning to sports or a fitness program, start slowly and build up gradually.

• Maintain your body with proper nutrition and hydration for optimal performance.

• Vary your fitness routine. Repetitive use of the same muscles and joints may cause strain or injury.

• If you feel pain, stop exercising and have the pain evaluated.

• Listen to your body and know your limits.