ONS is Proud to Support Seniors in Our Community

ONS is proud to support older residents in our community by sponsoring the 8th Annual Waveny LifeCare Network Mixed Paddle tournament, which raises much needed funds for their senior Paddle Logo 2016 Website2programs and housing services. Saturday, February 27 from 5:30 pm – 10:00 pm. The event is open to all paddle tennis enthusiasts: Pro, A and B. Flights. The event will take place at four paddle court sites in New Canaan and is followed by refreshments and prizes. More information and to register.

ONS is now in network with Anthem/Blue Cross Blue Shield

Anthem_BlueCross_BlueShield_logoONS is pleased to announce that nine of our physicians are now in-network with Anthem/Blue Cross Blue Shield Insurance: Amory Fiore, MD, Tim Greene, MD, Steven Hindman, MD, Marc S. Kowalsky, MD, David Nocek, MD, Mark Yakavonis, MD, Scott Simon, MD, Katie Vadasdi, MD, and David Wei, MD.  Anthem/BCBS joins the growing list of major insurances with which ONS participates. ONS continues to look for opportunities to expand our accessibility to patients throughout our community. Click to learn more about our other insurances or call 203-869-1145, ext. 226 or 279.

07/10/2019

15 ONS Physicians Rated Among Top Doctors in Connecticut

 

ApostolidesWhite  CamelWhite
ClainWhite CunninghamWhite EnnisWhite
FioreWhite  HeftlerWhite  HindmanWhite  KavanaghWhit3  Miller
 NocekWhite  Sethi_White  SimonWhite  VadasdiWhite  CroweWhite

Fifteen orthopedic surgeons with Orthopaedic & Neurosurgery Specialists (ONS) were named among Connecticut’s Top Doctors in a report published this month by Moffly Media. The doctors were selected by Castle Connolly Medical, Ltd, a well-respected national healthcare research and information company.

Among the physicians recognized for medical expertise and excellence were ONS’s entire neurosurgery team — Paul J. Apostolides, MD, Mark H. Camel, MD, Amory J. Fiore, MD and Scott Simon, MD. Orthopedic surgeons, Michael R. Clain, MD, James G. Cunningham, MD, Francis A. Ennis, MD, Steven E. Hindman, MD, Brian P. Kavanagh, MD, Seth R. Miller, MD, David P. Nocek, MD, Paul M. Sethi, MD, and Katherine B. Vadasdi, MD, were ranked among the top in their category as was Jeffrey M. Heftler, MD, for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. John F. Crowe, MD, who retired from ONS at the end of 2015 after 30 years of practice, was one of the leading physicians in his area of specialty, Hand Surgery.

 

Will Your Knees Be Ready to Ski? Tips from ONS to Avoid Injury

Although the forecasts are not yet predicting snow, skiers and snowboarders would be wise to take up a targeted conditioning program now to avoid the aches and injuries that often plague them on KatherineVadasdiMD300x398the slopes. Winter activities tend to tax muscles and muscle groups that are used very little during the rest of the year. As a result, even the best athletes can suffer when taking on the extreme stresses of downhill sports.

Orthopedic surgeon Steven Hindman, MD of Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialsts (ONS) in Greenwich and Stamford, CT, suggests that preseason conditioning exercises can help avert pain and the most feared knee injury of all – a season-ending tear to the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) .

“Ideally, people should start a conditioning program two to three months before they get near the mountain,” said Dr. Hindman. “But it’s never to late to benefit from a preventive exercise routine.” Too often, he noted, people go from their car to the ski lift without a single stretch. Such lack of preparation greatly increases the risk of injury.

One of four ligaments that provide stability to the knee, the ACL can tear when there is a sudden strain, abrupt change of direction, or twisting of the knee joint while the feet remain in a single direction. Skiers are at greatest risk to strain the ACL to the point of tearing when they try to recover from a fall with their body weight in back of the skis, if they don’t land a jump correctly, or if improperly set ski bindings don’t release during a a critical moment. ACL tears usually require surgery and a lengthy recuperation to repair.

Since the major leg muscles work the hardest when skiing and snowboarding, exercises should focus on strengthening thighs, hamstrings, calves and hips. Workouts that incorporate these muscle groups will help maintain good balance, stabilize the knee during stress situations and build endurance for a full day on the mountain. Adding practices such as yoga and Pilates will also develop strength and balance while improving the body’s flexibility and core fitness.

As important as conditioning is off the slopes, knowing your body’s limit is key on the slopes. Studies show that the majority of injuries happen at the end of the day with the combination of fatigue, flat light, and deteriorating snow conditions. “When you get tired, stop,” said Dr. Hindman.

 

“Maximizing Your Child’s Athletic Potential” Success

Delos_Houston_
Dr. Delos with Allan Houston

Last Thursday’s talk on “Maximizing Your Child’s Athletic Potential” was a success. A big thank you goes out to the Junior League of Greenwich for making it possible with their focus on improving the community and empowering others to further health and education! Ultimately they brought together the perfect combination of experts to inform the public about the youth and the sports they love.

Dr. Delos, of ONS and Greenwich Hospital, was a panel speaker at this event. He specializes in sports medicine and arthroscopic treatment of knee and shoulder disorders. Before ONS, Dr. Delos was the Assistant NFL Team Physician for the New York Giants and was team physician for a number of local high school and college athletes.

Other panel members consisted of Andy Barr, Director of Performance and Rehab for the New York Knicks, Mubarak “Bar” Malik, Head of Strength and Conditioning for the New York Knicks, and Allan Houston, one of NBA’s all-time greatest long range shooters and Olympic gold medalist, as the moderator. Each participant reinforced the importance of parents taking interest in the development of their young athlete and properly guiding them to the path of success. Parents attending this event were very attentive, and came prepared with questions.

Conversations covered the fundamental topics, like proper sleep habits and nutrition. For example, a young athlete’s nutrition should increase in relation to the amount of activity they experience daily. This may be common knowledge to an adult but for an adolescent, proper amounts of sleep and good nutrition that balances the amount of activity should be added to their routine.

Aside from the basic topics of discussion, there was a myth to be busted as well; to find out the details of the myth and for more information about the questions that were asked at the event, please read the article written by the Greenwich Freepress.

Delos_Group_2
Photography credit goes to the Delos family, thank you!

Suffer from Bunion Pain? Dr. Clain Offers Solutions

Bunions are a common deformity encountered in the foot where the big toe is out of alignment. This creates pain in that toe and often in the lesser toes as well. The deformity makes it difficult to find shoes that fit comfortably.  Ill-fitting shoes can contribute to the situation but the underlying deformity is genetic. This is why most patients can recall a parent or grandparent that had the problem.

In consultation, I often tell patients that the options are to accommodate the foot with wider shoes, gentle arch supports and sometimes padding or I encourage them to consider surgery.  The decision to proceed with surgery should be based on the overall level of discomfort and deformity.  This will differ from patient to patient.  It is rare that the patient that must have bunion surgery.  Most people will choose surgery due to the accumulation of annoyances, discomfort, pain and deformity in other toes.

It is very important, from my point of view, to communicate realistic expectations for the procedure and the ultimate result. I try hard to be very specific about the time involved in recovery and give every patient a written “expected surgical recovery.” It is obviously difficult to remember everything when you as the patient are given a great deal of information so it’s helpful to have a summary to refer to.

Not all bunions are the same. Routinely, I perform about six different surgical procedures.  The goal is to do the most appropriate operation for your particular foot and circumstance.  With careful communication and a well thought-out plan it is highly likely that we should be able to get a great result for almost any foot.”

For more information about Dr. Clain, click here.

If you suffer from bunions and would like to attend a free seminar on foot pain Dr. Yakavonis of ONS and Greenwich Hospital will present Solutions for Foot & Ankle Pain: Beyond Foot Massage is an orthopedic surgeon specializing in foot and ankle surgery. He will present treatments and surgical techniques for bunions and other foot deformities. Learn more and register online here.

07/10/2019

ONS Physiatrist, Christopher Sahler, MD on post New York City Marathon Tips for Runners

Christopher Sahler, MD
Christopher Sahler, MD

Christopher S. Sahler, MD of ONS is an interventional physiatrists specializing in sports medicine. His focus is non-operative treatment of musculoskeletal injuries, restoring proper function, reducing pain and promoting active lifestyles.

“Each year 50,000 people participate in the NYC marathon. If you are in that group and completed the race this past weekend, congratulations! It is an exciting accomplishment that you will remember for the rest of your life.

Now that the race is over, there are a few key points to remember that will help to maximize your recovery and minimize pain. Many athletes experience worsening soreness over the following days after the race. This is known as delayed onset muscle soreness and typically is most painful 48-72 hours later. After the race, your body is in a depleted state so it is important to take in plenty of water and healthy food. A combination of complex carbohydrates and protein help the muscles to repair themselves and re-build their energy stores. It is also recommended that you perform light, short duration activities such as walking, gentle jogging, biking, swimming etc. This helps to increase blood flow to the muscles and tissues that need the nutrients the most and helps to wash away the built up metabolic byproducts such as lactic acid. Gentle stretching and soaking in a warm bath may also help loosen up the muscles. Depending on your previous activity level, it is important to give your body time off before re-starting any intense exercise routines. Most runners should take at least one month off.

Congratulations again on the race!”

Dr. Sahler will present “Exercise as Treatment for Chronic Pain.” Learn how exercise can be used as a safe and effective treatment for chronic pain conditions. This free health seminar will be in the Noble Conference room at Greenwich Hospital Tuesday, December 2 at 6:00 p.m.  To register call 203-863-4277 or register online at https://www.greenhosp.org/CREG/ClassDetails.aspx?sid=1&ClassID=5348

 

Do You Experience Foot or Ankle Pain?

Mark, Yakavonis, MD, MMS, will be speaking at the Noble in Greenwich Hospital December 9th at

6:30pm to address Solutions for Foot & Ankle Pain: Beyond Foot Massage. Here is a summary of what he will present:

A painful foot or ankle condition can limit a patient’s function and quality of life with every step. Conditions from the toes to the Achilles tendon will be discussed with emphasis on surgical and nonsurgical options, including old standards and the most cutting edge new technologies. Topics covered will include foot and toe deformities such as bunions, hammertoes, flat feet, and high arches, with special attention to when and how these conditions should be treated or when they should be left alone. Plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendinitis will be discussed in detail with emphasis on the natural progression of the disease, what we know works and what is experimental. Arthritic conditions of the foot, ranging from the big toe to the ankle will be included.

A team approach is an important aspect of foot and ankle care. ONS physical therapist Alicia Hirscht, DPT, SCS, CSCS will discuss and answer questions about the role of physical therapy to improve foot and ankle pain and dysfunction.

ONS Senior Clinical Specialist Alicia Hirsch
ONS Senior Clinical Specialist Alicia Hirsch, DPT, SCS, CSCS

Dr. Yakavonis will introduce an orthotic maker he typically works with and will discuss when and how orthotics are used, from inexpensive over-the-counter inserts to custom molded prostheses. Other options to be discussed will include stem cell technology and image-guided injections.

Dr. Yakavonis will open up a question and answer session following the seminar. This event is free registration requested, call (203) 863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register online at:  https://www.greenhosp.org/CREG/ClassDetails.aspx?sid=1&ClassID=7253

Foot Ankle Pain Brochure

07/10/2019

ONS Orthopedic Surgeon Seth Miller, MD, Elected to Join Elite Medical Society

Seth Miller, MD
ONS Orthopaedic Surgeon, Seth Miller, MD

At the October Closed Meeting of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), held in Pinehurst, NC, ONS (Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists) orthopedic surgeon Dr. Seth Miller was elected to join the ASES organization.  “Membership in ASES is a privilege and an honor” said Dr. Jim Cunningham, ONS Vice President. Membership in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons is by invitation only. Only experienced orthopedic surgeons who have completed a fellowship in shoulder surgery, elbow surgery, and/or sports medicine are considered for membership.

Dr. Miller, in his 25th year in practice at ONS in Greenwich, has ascended quickly in his career being recognized with such a national honor.  Candidates must meet strict academic and clinical requirements to become members of ASES.

“ASES is a remarkable collection of like-minded surgeons, and researchers who, through their collaboration and the sharing of techniques and outcomes, work together to solve the most complicated and pressing shoulder and elbow disorders. Founded on the premise that by such sharing of ideas we can determine the most efficient, cost effective, high quality shoulder and elbow care” said Dr. Robert Bell, ASES President.

The American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons was created to enhance the study of Conditions_shouldershoulder and elbow surgery and to foster advances in the field, serving as an educational body responsible for scientific programs and advances.  The Mission of the ASES is to support the ethical practice of evidence-based, high quality, cost-effective, shoulder and elbow care.

The society global impact on quality shoulder and elbow care is achieved through leadership, medical education, scientific research, and patient advocacy. Congratulations to Dr. Miller on becoming an Associate Member of the society.

ONS is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice serving patients throughout Fairfield and Westchester Counties and the New York Metropolitan area. ONS physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com, or call (203) 869-1145.

ONS SPONSORS NEWS 12 SCHOLAR ATHLETE AWARD

Orthopaedic-NeurosurgerySpecialists

October 2014 – June 2015, NEWS 12 CONNECTICUT will introduce and recognize a local area high school student athlete by featuring the student and their school during the NEWS 12 CONNECTICUT SCHOLAR ATHLETE weekly segment sponsored by ONS. Students who excel in both academics and athletics are nominated by coaches and athletic directors with extracurricular activities and leadership qualities noted. At the end of each academic year, scholarships are awarded to three NEWS 12 CONNECTICUT Scholar Athletes.

Watch NEWS 12 CONNECTICUT on Mondays 5 p.m. to midnight to catch the stories of the nominees. Cross-channel airing will run on CNBC, ESPN, ESPN2, MSG-TV, NBCS-TV or visit <NEWS 12 Sports online>.

Missed a segment? Links to our NEWS12 SCHOLAR ATHLETES are listed below:
Matt Doyle
Jamie Kockenmeister
Olivia Haskell
Simon Whiteman
Ali Weiner
Lars Pederson
Hannah Caldwell
Elizabeth Miller
Dugald Shannon

ONS Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter’s P is for Posture When Sitting or During Chores!

OSTEO_graphicMost Americans spend too much time sitting and should take advantage of these tips to help keep good posture.

First, when sitting in a chair make sure your buttocks is all the way to the back of the chair. Using a lumbar roll in the small of your back will help to keep optimal alignment.

Second, if you  sit at a computer, your monitor should be at eye level, feet firmly on floor, hands and wrists in a straight line, shoulders back and elbows at 90 degrees. A break from sitting every 30 minutes will relieve your back of stresses placed on it while sitting. For a more detailed guide to improve seated posture, download Work Station Ergonomics  as a reference.

Posture is equally important when doing chores. While working, make sure your lower back is in a neutral position to avoid a forward curve in your spine. Watching your posture over the years will help avoid vertebral compression fractures due to osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis, or thinning bones, can result in painful fractures. Risk factors for osteoporosisosteoporosis include aging, being female, low body weight, low sex hormones or menopause, smoking, and some medications.

To learn more about osteoporosis, bone anatomy, fracture prevention exercises to promote bone health, updates on treatments, measures to promote strong bones and personal risk factors, register to attend a free health seminar on October 14, 2014 at Greenwich Hospital in the Noble Conference Room.  The panel of speaker include ONS Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Greenwich Hospital Endocrinologist Renee Ileva, MD and ONS Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter, PT, CLT . After the seminar you will be able to ask the doctors and therapist questions.

ONS Orthopedic Surgeon and Hand Specialist, Mark Vitale, MD Presents at 69th Annual American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH)

Dr Vitale Portrait -sm web
Mark Vitale, MD

September 19, 2014, ONS orthopedic hand surgeon Dr. Mark Vitale traveled to Boston at the 69th annual American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH), the premier annual hand surgery meeting where the nation’s leading hand surgeons gather to present new research and techniques for the care of hand, wrist, nerve and upper extremity problems.

Dr. Vitale presented two of the conferences’ 84 podium presentations to the community of hand surgeons in the U.S. and abroad. One of his presentations entitled, “Intra-articular fractures of the sigmoid notch of the distal radius: an analysis of progression to distal radioulnar joint arthritis and impact on upper extremity function in surgically treated fractures,” was a study that looked at fractures of one of the understudied joints of the wrist. This study will help surgeons guide treatment of these fractures to optimize wrist function in surgically treated fractures.

Traditional treatments for thumb arthritis involve removing the arthritic bone in the wrist called the trapezium which forms a joint with the base of the thumb and then using part of a patient’s own tendon to reconstruct the thumb. Dr. Vitale’s research revealed that the results with this more traditional “trapeziectomy” surgery are excellent and time tested.21

Dr. Vitale Speaking at the ASSH His second presentation, “A comparison of pyrolytic carbon hemiarthrioplasty versus Thompson suspensionplasty in the treatment of trapezial metacarpal arthritis,” was a study that compared a traditional treatment for thumb arthritis with a new pyrocarbon joint replacement for the thumb.

Pyrolytic carbon joint replacement is a synthetic implant to replace the arthritic thumb/wrist joint that was initially developed and first used in conjunction with hand surgeons at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. It resurfaces the base of the arthritic thumb metacarpal bone while leaving more of the native trapezium bone in place. The pyrolytic joint replacement implant has been used since the early 2000s. The result of this study found some improved function in patients treated with the pyrocarbon joint replacement, but also a higher risk of need for future surgeries in those treated with the newer joint replacement.

Hand surgeons today debate about what surgical procedures are most appropriate for severely arthritic thumbs. The results of Dr. Vitale’s research will now help guide surgeons around the country to better treat patients.

Dr. Vitale commented, “The ASSH conference was a great success. The ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education has provided us with an incredible state of the art research and biomechanics lab from which we continue to drive the field of hand surgery, sports medicine and orthopedic surgery.”

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists PC (ONS) is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice in Greenwich, CT. ONS physicians provide expertise in sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, please visit www.onsmd.com.

ONS Sports Medicine Specialists and Orthopedic Surgeons awarded 2nd place at The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Meeting for “Incidence of Culture Positive Propionibacterium Acnes in Shoulder Arthroscopy”

UNDERSTANDING AND PREVENTING SURGICAL SITE INFECTION

The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) was founded primarily as a forum for research and education for orthopedic surgeons, physicians and health care professionals in the field of sports medicine. Each year the AOSSM holds a conference to highlight areas of recent research, surgical techniques and to debate and share clinical insights about hot topics in the field of sports medicine. Physicians are recognized and awarded for their efforts in research and presentations about sports medicine conditions.

At the annual AOSSM meeting held in Seattle, Washington this July 10th-13th, ONS orthopedic surgeons Timothy Greene, MD, Katie Vadasdi, MD, director of the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center and Paul Sethi, MD, President of the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education, were awarded 2nd place for research presented on “Incidence of Culture Positive Propionibacterium Acnes in Shoulder Arthroscopy.” This research is best described in a statement below from Dr. Paul Sethi:

“As the field of shoulder surgery and, particularly, shoulder replacement grows, the risk of developing shoulder infection increases. When treated imperfectly, infection may cause devastating complications. Our goal is to help develop a universal measure to absolutely minimize post-surgical infection. Reducing complications adds value to patient experience and avoids the costly road of infection eradication. The bacterium (Proprionibacter Acnes) most commonly attributed to shoulder infection is a very unusual organism. Until recently, it was not properly recognized because it was so difficult to identify.

Now that one of the greatest bacterial offenders (in the shoulder) has been more clearly identified, we are looking for ways to prevent it from infecting patients. In our last study we took over three hundred cultures and studied them. After careful analysis, we were able to identify when (during surgery) patients are most susceptible to this bacterial infection and were able to determine just how frequently this bacteria is present. Now that we know when this bacterium may gain its access to patients, we are developing ways to attack it at the patient’s point of vulnerability.”

Paul Sethi, MD
Paul Sethi, MD
Katie Vadasdi, MD
Katie Vadasdi, MD
Timothy Greene, MD
Timothy Greene, MD

Sethi PM, Greene T, Vadasdi K, Miller S.  Incidence of P. Acnes Culture after Primary Shoulder Arthroscopy.  AOSSM Annual Meeting. Seattle, WA. July 2014

Posters are judged by the AOSSM Education Program Committee. With just three poster awards available, we congratulate our physicians on their research and 2nd place award.

ONS Foundation Awarded 2nd Place in AOSSM Poster Contest
ONS Foundation Awarded 2nd Place in AOSSM Poster Contest

For more information on the AOSSM Annual Meeting, please click here: http://www.sportsmed.org/Education/Meetings/Annual_Meeting_2014/2014_Annual_Meeting/

Program:
http://www.sportsmed.org/uploadedFiles/Content2/Education/Meetings/Annual_Meeting_2014/AOSSM%202014%20Final%20Program.pdf

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists PC (ONS) is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice in Greenwich, CT. ONS physicians provide expertise in sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopaedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, please visit www.onsmd.com.

 

 

Is the Screwball Pitch Hard on the Arm? ONS Orthopedic Surgeon Paul Sethi, MD Weighs In

BaseballWhen you think of baseball pitchers, what comes to mind? Fastball? Curveball?

These are common terms used to describe pitches thrown during Major League Baseball games. Professional pitchers that have perfected these two conventional styles may not have the special skill and expertise to pull off one of the most, if not the most difficult pitches in baseball history, the screwball.

New York Times article The Mystery of the Vanishing Screwball,” by Bruce Schoenfeld, describes the “screwball” as “erratic, irrational or illogical, unexpected.”

In his article, Schoenfeld writes about the screwball technique gleaning inside information from Hector Santiago of the Los Angeles Angels who says the secret to the pitch is “like driving with your right wheels going around a curve.”

Schoenfeld goes on to write that “Unlike the knuckleball, which is easy to throw but hard to master, the screwball requires special expertise just to get it to the plate. The successful screwball pitcher must overcome an awkward sensation that feels like tightening a pickle jar while simultaneously thrusting the wrist forward with extreme velocity.”

Chicago White Sox pitching coach Don Cooper is quoted in the article saying “the word on the street is that the screwball is hard on the arm.” Although there is no documentation of this, many experts continue to debate as to whether or not the intensity of such a throw is harmful to the arm.

According to the article, Schoenfeld found no existing research to help answer the screwball pitch question. That’s when he contacted ONS Orthopedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist Paul Sethi, MD.

Dr. Paul Sethi, a Connecticut orthopedist, was willing to help generate some new data. Sethi is a disciple of Dr. Frank Jobe, the man who did an ulnar collateral graft in Tommy John’s elbow in 1974 and so created the most famous baseball-medical connection since Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Dr. Paul Sethi
Paul Sethi, MD

I met Sethi at the Center for Motion Analysis in Farmington, Conn., in a 108-foot-long room as bright as an operating theater. A dozen cameras were mounted on the walls. A tattooed 26-year-old named Matt Bartolomei stood on a portable pitcher’s mound while technicians adhered sensors to his body.”

Dr. Sethi, along with a team of experts, were able to watch in slow motion and concluded that the force exerted on the elbow of the pitcher when he threw a screwball during the experiment was identical to that of a fastball or curveball.

“In fact, the screwball doesn’t exceed the fastball in any parameter.” The results were hardly definitive, especially given the data set of one. “But looking at the data compared to the normative data kind of makes me tingly,” Sethi said.

If he and Nissen could confirm the conclusions, Sethi believed they might rescue the screwball from near-extinction. While assisting Jobe in Los Angeles, he worked with Dodgers pitchers. He liked the idea of contributing to their cause. I was less certain, though, that a doctor could revive the flat lining screwball. For a pitch to be used regularly by major leaguers, or even Little Leaguers, it needed a stronger selling point than mere safety.”

Although the “screwball” has been somewhat “abandoned” by baseball, the research conducted by Dr. Sethi and the team he worked with could make for a comeback. In a phone message yesterday Dr. Sethi confirmed, “the “screwball” pitch isn’t a cause for higher risk of injury than that of a fastball or knuckleball. It puts the same amount of stress on the arm as the other pitches do.”

Paul Sethi, MD is a board-certified orthopedic surgeon who specializes in sports medicine, the shoulder and elbow. He served as an orthopedic consultant to the Los Angeles Dodgers baseball team. Sethi was also a former assistant team physician of the Los Angeles Lakers basketball team, Los Angeles Kings hockey team, Los Angeles Dodgers, and University of Southern California football team.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists PC (ONS) is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice in Greenwich, CT. ONS physicians provide expertise in sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopaedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, please visit www.onsmd.com.

[Read Full New York Times Article]

ONS Docs Included in Castle Connolly New York Top Doctors Guide, 17th edition

14 Specialists from ONS included in New York Area Medical Guide Book top primary care and specialty care doctors in the tri-state metropolitan New York area.

Fourteen physicians from Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists (ONS) on Valley Drive are included in the latest edition of Castle Connolly Top Doctors, New York Metro Area guidebook. The resource directory, which is in its seventeenth edition, is a guide to finding the top primary care and specialty care doctors in the tri-state metropolitan New York area. It details information on over 6,400 physicians in 65 specialties. Physicians profiled in the guide were nominated by their peers and screened by a research team at Castle Connolly.

Castle Connolly Top Doctors® are nominated by their peers including physicians and hospital executives throughout the New York metropolitan region in an online survey process. Nominations are open to all board certified MDs and DOs. Nominated physicians are selected by the Castle Connolly physician-led research team based on criteria including medical education, training, hospital appointments, disciplinary histories and much more.

ONS physicians included in the 17th edition of the guide are neurosurgeons Paul Apostolides, MD; Mark Camel, MD;  Amory Fiore, MD; and Scott Simon, MD, orthopedic surgeons Michael Clain, MD; John Crowe, MD; James Cunningham, MD; Frank Ennis, MD; Steven Hindman, MD; Brian Kavanagh, MD; Seth Miller, MD; Paul Sethi, MD; and Katie Vadasdi, MD and physiatrist Jeffrey Heftler, MD.

“We congratulate our physicians who have been recognized as ‘Top Doctors’ by Castle Connolly,” said hand and wrist specialist Dr. John Crowe. “Having fourteen of our fine doctors included in this authoritative guide is a reflection of the commitment and quality of excellence of all our physicians and entire staff at ONS. The multidisciplinary nature of ONS makes it possible to provide patients with access to the most advanced care available in orthopedics, neurosurgery and physiatry.”

Survey recipients are asked to nominate those doctors who, in their judgment, are the best in their field and related fields– especially those to whom they would refer their own patients and family members.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists PC (ONS) is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice in Greenwich, CT. ONS physicians provide expertise in sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopaedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, please visit www.onsmd.com.

ONS Doctors Receive 40 Under 40 Award

Congratulations to Dr. Vitale and Dr. Vadasdi of Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, Greenwich, CT, who received the 40 Under 40 award June 19, 2014, at the Palace in Stamford!

Dr. Vitale is  recognized for his career adv40Under40Winnersances, contribution to published research, community involvement and organizing trips to the country of Haiti where he and a group of clinician/physicians provide medical services to those in need.

Dr. Vadasdi was recognized for achievements in her medical career in orthopedics and sports medicine, for her community work and as an athlete.

Each year WAG Magazine and Fairfield County Business Journal recognize 40 professionals under the age of 40 as leaders in the workplace and community. Nominees are submitted and winners are decided by a panel. This year marked the 10th anniversary of this award. We are proud of both our winners, the work they do here at ONS, in the community and abroad.

40under40eventphoto