ONS Shoulder Surgeon Katherine B. Vadasdi, MD, is Published

STUDY FINDS SUCCESS IN TREATMENT FOR FROZEN SHOULDER.Dr. Katharine Vadasdi, Shoulder Surgeon

Promising results of a new study by ONS orthopedic shoulder surgeon Katherine Vadasdi, MD and other researchers were published this month in the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. The study, The Effect of Myofibroblasts and Corticosteroid Injections in Adhesive Capsulitis, was conducted to investigate the effect  that steroid injections administered directly into the shoulder joint would have on the painful and limiting condition called Adhesive Capsulitis.

Also known as Frozen Shoulder, Adhesive Capsulitis is a common, severely painful condition that leads to stiffness and reduced range of motion in the joint.  In the study, Dr. Vadasdi and the research team evaluated the changes in the lining of the joint that contributes to or causes Frozen Shoulder. They discovered an increase in a certain cell type called myofibroblasts, which cause the capsule surrounding the shoulder joint to contact and form scar tissue, leading to pain and increasing stiffness.  Steroid injections directly into the joint, however, reduced the increase in myofibroblasts, and helped reverse and prevent progression of the condition.

Frozen Shoulder most commonly affects women between the ages of 40 and 60 years.  Most cases of Frozen Shoulder can be resolved non-operatively through stretching, physical therapy, anti-inflammatory medications and cortisone injections.  In severe cases, a procedure known as arthroscopic capsular release is performed to break up the adhesions. The findings in Dr. Vadasdi’s study suggest  a more rapid resolution of the condition and possibly a decrease in cases needing surgery.

The Effect of Myofibroblasts and Corticosteroid Injections in Adhesive Capsulitis, Carolyn M. Hettrich, MD, MPH, Edward F. DiCarlo, MD, Deborah Faryniarz, MD, Katherine B. Vadasdi, MD, Riley Williams, MD, Jo A. Hannafin, MD, PhD. 1274-1279. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery (25) 2016

Dr. Vadasdi is an orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine physician who specializes in conditions of the shoulder, knee and elbow. She is the Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Center at ONS and is a sought after speaker on the topic of women and sports injury and prevention.  Her chosen area of medical specialty reflects her personal interests.  She is an accomplished triathlete, having completed Ironman competitions in 2007 and 2009. Dr. Vadasdi is also an alpine climber and has ascended Mount Kilimanjaro, Mount Rainier, and the Grand Teton, among others.

High Spirits at BCA 5K

TEAM ONS’ SPIRITS WERE HIGH AT THE BCA 5K.

Despite the rainy weather and cool temperatures, ONS orthopedic surgeons Marc S. Kowalsky, MD and Katherine B. Vadasdi, MD along with members of the ONS physical therapy department were in good form for the first annual Breast Cancer Awareness 5K run/1 mile walk.  Team ONS ran, walked, (some did both) and manned the ONS sponsor’s table to Group Shot2greet fellow BCA supporters and educate them about the comprehensive orthopedic and neurosurgery services that are provided by the Women’s Sports Medicine Center at ONS.

ONS Physical Therapy Manager, Alicia Hirscht, DPT, SCS, CSCS, led a pre-run warm up routine before the runners took to the wet but beautiful course which started on Mason Street. wound its way down Steamboat Road and through Bruce Park before returning to Richards 3.1 miles later. Many thanks to Dr. Kowalsky, Dr. Vadasdi, Alicia, Chalon Lefevbre, PT, LMT, Betsy Kreuter, PT, CLT, Tanya Kalyuzhny, DPT, MDT,  Caitlin Yauch, PT, PT technicians Carolina Castillo and  Kristin Sury, and PT front desk rep Rachel Olsen, for their enthusiastic support.

ONS to Sponsor BCA 5-K Run/Walk for Hope

THE WOMEN’S SPORTS MEDICINE CENTER AT ONS IS PROUD TO SUPPORT THE BREAST CANCER ALLIANCE RUN/WALK FOR HOPE 5K.

It’s not too late to register and join Dr. Katie B. Vadasdi, sports medicine specialist and director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Center at ONWSMC BCA 5k t-shirtS, ONS Stamford Physicial Therapy Manager, Alicia Hirscht, DPT, SCS, CSCS, and others from Team ONS for a pre-run warm up and stretch before we hit the road!

WHEN: Sunday, May 1, 2016

WHAT: Breast Cancer Alliance Run/Walk for Hope 5K

WHERE: Beginning and ending at Richards, 359 Greenwich Avenue, Greenwich

9:10 ONS Warm up

9:30  5K begins

10:45 One-mile kick off

The Women’s Sports Medicine Center at ONS is proud to support the Breast Cancer Alliance in its efforts to help eradicate breast cancer. Most of us know someone, or know of someone who has been faced with this disease. Last year, an estimated 1,700,00 American women were diagnosed with breast cancer, and nearly 600,000 American women died from it.

Chocolate and Athletic Performance

Portrait Of Fitness Mature Man Eating A Energy Bar Of Chocolate

CAN CHOCOLATE IMPROVE ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE? SOME RESEARCHES SAY IT CAN.

Here’s one more study to suggest that indulging in chocolate and physical fitness are not mutually exclusive.  Past research has indicated that flavanols in cocoa beans have antioxidant effects the can help lower blood pressure, improve vascular function and reduce the cell damage involved in heart disease.  Now, research published in The Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition puts forward the notion that one of the flavanols in the cocoa bean and dark chocolate, epicatechin, can increase the production of nitric oxide in the body. Nitric oxide causes blood vessels to dilate and reduces oxygen consumption, which in turn seems to increase athletic performance.

Nitric acid is also a bi-product of nitrates in beetroot juice, which is popular among elite athletes because it enhances their endurance.  A  postgraduate research student from Kingston University in London, Rishikesh Kankesh Patel, wanted to know if dark chocolate could provide similar benefits.  His supervised study involved nine amateur cyclists who were put into two groups after establishing a baseline in fitness levels. For two weeks, the cyclists  replaced a daily snack with 1.5 ounces of chocolate, with one group consuming dark chocolate, the other  white chocolate. Following the two weeks, the participants performed  moderate cycling exercises and time trials while researchers measured their heart rates and oxygen consumption. The riders then took a week-long break from eating the sweet, then switched chocolate types and repeated the two-week trial and exercises tests.

Patel and his team, noted that after consuming dark chocolate, the athletes used less oxygen when cycling at a moderate pace and out-distanced their white chocolate eating counterparts in a 2-minute time trial.  While the results appear promising, more research with a larger study group is needed to determine such factors as the optimal quantity to consume, the time period in which to consume it, and the duration of benefits.

If those questions can be answered, however, dark chocolate may offer a tastier training tool to athletes who find beetroot juice too bitter to palate, and to anyone else looking for a good excuse to each chocolate.

ONS Featured in Greenwich Sentinel

sentinel_logo_transparentYou can learn about the early days of ONS and the philosophy that made us the most comprehensive and advanced practice the region. The writer, Sara Poirier Correa, did an excellent job explaining that with 22 top sub-specialty trained physicians, ONS is able to provide personalized services to patients. The article also highlights the Women’s Sports Medicine Center and the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education, which has published internationally and competes among researchers at larger universities such as Harvard, Yale, and Johns Hopkins. http://bit.ly/1PNTkfh

 

PRP: A step forward in regenerative medicine

Dr Kessel
Dr. Tamar Kessel, physiatrist, with a C-arm

Dr. Kessel is a physiatrist who specializes in non-operative treatments of musculoskeletal injuries and has an interest in the use of ultrasound to target medications to the precise location of tissue damage. One procedure that optimizes on ultrasound technology is the new and progressive treatment in regenerative medicine, PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma). Utilizing therapeutic injections, like PRP, has been shown to be safer and to greatly improve treatment results.  The treatment has even received significant attention from the media and has been used by members of the New York Giants along with other NFL players and elite athletes. Dr. Kessel is committed to providing the highest quality medical care and achieving the best outcomes for her patients.

PRP is a new treatment in regenerative medicine that uses the patient’s own blood and platelets to promote healing and helps the body optimize on its own natural processes. The patient’s own blood is drawn then placed in a centrifuge machine that separates the blood, leaving the platelet rich plasma ready to be removed. Afterwards, the PRP is placed right into the area of damage using ultrasound. Most people benefit from one injection but depending on the severity of the damage, it could take up to three. This method can help heal injuries including tendon/ligament injuries (Achilles Tendonitis), tennis elbow, cartilage loss, arthritis, and small tears (rotator cuff tears and meniscal injuries).

Note: Because PRP is given in the hopes of optimizing the initial inflammatory response of healing, anti-inflammatory medications should likely be stopped at the time of PRP treatment. Please consult your physician before any procedure.

“Maximizing Your Child’s Athletic Potential” Success

Delos_Houston_
Dr. Delos with Allan Houston

Last Thursday’s talk on “Maximizing Your Child’s Athletic Potential” was a success. A big thank you goes out to the Junior League of Greenwich for making it possible with their focus on improving the community and empowering others to further health and education! Ultimately they brought together the perfect combination of experts to inform the public about the youth and the sports they love.

Dr. Delos, of ONS and Greenwich Hospital, was a panel speaker at this event. He specializes in sports medicine and arthroscopic treatment of knee and shoulder disorders. Before ONS, Dr. Delos was the Assistant NFL Team Physician for the New York Giants and was team physician for a number of local high school and college athletes.

Other panel members consisted of Andy Barr, Director of Performance and Rehab for the New York Knicks, Mubarak “Bar” Malik, Head of Strength and Conditioning for the New York Knicks, and Allan Houston, one of NBA’s all-time greatest long range shooters and Olympic gold medalist, as the moderator. Each participant reinforced the importance of parents taking interest in the development of their young athlete and properly guiding them to the path of success. Parents attending this event were very attentive, and came prepared with questions.

Conversations covered the fundamental topics, like proper sleep habits and nutrition. For example, a young athlete’s nutrition should increase in relation to the amount of activity they experience daily. This may be common knowledge to an adult but for an adolescent, proper amounts of sleep and good nutrition that balances the amount of activity should be added to their routine.

Aside from the basic topics of discussion, there was a myth to be busted as well; to find out the details of the myth and for more information about the questions that were asked at the event, please read the article written by the Greenwich Freepress.

Delos_Group_2
Photography credit goes to the Delos family, thank you!

The Fragile Feet: A Ballerina Story (Part I)

Ballerina
Ballerina in en pointe position

Dr. Yakavonis, MD, MMS, of ONS and Greenwich Hospital is an orthopedic surgeon specializing in foot and ankle surgery and treatments for adult foot conditions as well as youth sports injuries in field athletes, gymnasts and ballet dancers. He shares a two-part blog about conditions to be aware of for ballet dancers and gymnasts.

Ballet dancers feet are much like a musician’s handsthey earn a living with them. In addition to putting an amazing amount of stress on their feet, they also are often well below an ideal body weight – either because of the stress of an enormous amount of training or because of unrealistic expectations placed on them by the ballet community. This leads to several different and often unique foot and ankle conditions.

One fairly unique foot and ankle condition in ballet is caused by the en pointe position. In this position an enormous amount of strain is put on the dancer’s great toe, as it is essentially holding up the entire body weight through a small joint. The main flexor tendon of the toe, called the flexor hallicus longus – normally quite small, takes over the job of the largest tendon in the body, the Achilles. The flexor hallicus longus hypertrophies well in compensation for its new job, but unfortunately this tendon is forced through a tight tunnel in the back of the ankle. When it gets too large it will get pinched in the posterior ankle joint. Patients develop painful irritation of the bones and soft tissues in the posterior ankle. An extra bone in the posterior ankle called the os trigonum, which present in about 10% of all people, can be become very painful and irritated in many ballerinas. This constellation of problems is called posterior impingement of the ankle, and it is noticed by the patient as a vague deep pain in the posterior part of the ankle, in front of the Achilles, that is felt with plantarflexion, the position of pointing the foot and toes downward.

Ballet dancers suffer from numerous other problems of the foot & ankle, many of which are not unique. One of the less glamorous problems they deal with are corns, calluses, and blisters. These are necessary adaptations to allow a high level dancer to compete.

Similar to posterior impingement, which arises from dancers spending an inordinate amount of time and stress in an extreme position at the ankle, ballet dancers will develop anterior impingement at the ankle. This comes from repetitive forceful dorsiflexion – pulling the foot and toes upward, toward the shin. Landing from jumps and deep knee bends exacerbate this problem. Pain is felt in the anterior ankle.

Treatment for the above condition is customized to the patient. Often a minor activity modification, or period of rest, can dramatically improve the symptoms. Unfortunately, rest is not easy to come by in the competitive living of a gymnast. Many dancers will treat the symptoms with a combination of anti-inflammatory medications and occasional steroid injections in the region of maximal tenderness. Surgery is a last resort option for any ballerina – when symptoms persist for many months and are limiting, despite all other efforts. Surgery is typically very successful in these patients and can be done with arthroscopic or minimally invasive techniques.

The most common orthopaedic injury of all is also very common amongst ballet dancers: the lateral (traditional) ankle sprain. The mainstay of treatment for ankle sprains is rest, ice, compression, and elevation – mnemonic RICE. A short period of rest and immobilization (1-2 weeks) is followed by aggressive physical therapy, with strengthening of the muscles that stabilize the ankle. Recent research has pointed to improved short and long-term outcomes when early motion and weight bearing is initiated. There is promising early research on the role of stem cell injections – harvested from the patient’s own blood or bone marrow – in the setting of an acute ankle sprain. This is a technique we will offer for the highest level athletes and dancers in certain situations, understanding that the research data on this intervention is still in development.

… to be continued in the next segment, The Fragile Feet: A Gymnast Story (Part II)

Want to learn even more? Dr. Yakavonis will be giving a seminar on “Solutions for Foot and Ankle Pain: Beyond a Foot Massage.”  The program is free and open to the public. Registration Requested. Call (203) 863-4277 or register online at www.greenhosp.org.

07/10/2019

Train Right, Run Free! ONS Physical Therapist Alicia Hirscht Shows Us how to Train for a Marathon

The ONS Foundation’s Annual 5K Run/Walk is coming up this Sunday, September 21st in Old Greenwich! ONS supporters, staff and former patients will participate in this fun-filled event. It would be great to see you all come down and enjoy a nice morning jog. Some of you may be casual joggers, others might want to participate in the local race circuit, or you might be training for the NYC Marathon.

ONS Senior Clinical Specialist Alicia Hirsch
ONS Senior Clinical Specialist Alicia Hirsch

Whether you are a casual runner, training for the marathon, or just someone who supports local causes with a 5K run…all runners are at risk of developing injuries if they are not training properly. A question I ask all my runners in the clinic is, “What else do you do for training, besides running?” More often than not, the answer is, “nothing” or “I stretch sometimes.”  What many runners do not know is that research has shown an effective leg and core strengthening program can reduce the incidence of hip, knee and ankle pain.

A proper program needs to have exercises specific for running: weight bearing on one leg, focused on shock absorbing muscle groups, and emphasizing hip and core strength. Many runners feel that stretching in their training can help prevent injury. However, many injuries occur because of inherent muscle weakness, not necessarily because of tightness.  To address this weakness, incorporate the exercises below into your routine: 3 times per week. Good luck with your training!

 

Hamstring Curls with the Ball:

1. Lie on your back with your legs up on a ball.

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2. Lift your hips, bend your knees and roll the ball in towards your buttocks.

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3. Roll the ball back out and lower your hips.

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One Legged Bridges:

1. Lie on your back with one knee bent, the other straight in the air.

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2. Pushing through the bent knee, lift your hips off the ground. Lower back down.

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Repeat: 3 sets of 15 reps on each leg.

 

 

 

 

 


Sideplanks:

1. Lie on your side, heels in line with your shoulders.

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2. Supporting yourself on your elbow, lift your body off the ground. Lower back down, repeat:

 

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3. Lower back down, repeat:

 

 

 

Hip Dips:

 1. Stand on your left leg only.

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2. Let your trunk bend forward while extending your right leg straight back. Let your arms fall freely, keep your left knee slightly bent. Keep your stomach muscles tight and your back in neutral, bend through your hip.

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3. Return to start position, repeat: 2 sets of 15 reps on each leg.

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One Legged Heel Raises:

1. Stand off the edge of a step, letting your heel hang below the step.

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2. Push up onto your toes. Lower back down slowly.

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Repeat: 3 sets of 15 reps on each leg.


Lateral Squats:

1. Stand sideways on a step.

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2. Sit your hips back and bend your knee, lowering your opposite leg to the ground. Do not let your knee fall inward and do not let it bend past your toes.

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3. Lift back up and repeat: 2 sets of 15 reps


Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists PC (ONS)
is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice in Greenwich, CT. ONS physicians provide expertise in sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopaedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, please visit www.onsmd.com.

ONS Sports Medicine Specialists and Orthopedic Surgeons awarded 2nd place at The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Meeting for “Incidence of Culture Positive Propionibacterium Acnes in Shoulder Arthroscopy”

UNDERSTANDING AND PREVENTING SURGICAL SITE INFECTION

The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) was founded primarily as a forum for research and education for orthopedic surgeons, physicians and health care professionals in the field of sports medicine. Each year the AOSSM holds a conference to highlight areas of recent research, surgical techniques and to debate and share clinical insights about hot topics in the field of sports medicine. Physicians are recognized and awarded for their efforts in research and presentations about sports medicine conditions.

At the annual AOSSM meeting held in Seattle, Washington this July 10th-13th, ONS orthopedic surgeons Timothy Greene, MD, Katie Vadasdi, MD, director of the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center and Paul Sethi, MD, President of the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education, were awarded 2nd place for research presented on “Incidence of Culture Positive Propionibacterium Acnes in Shoulder Arthroscopy.” This research is best described in a statement below from Dr. Paul Sethi:

“As the field of shoulder surgery and, particularly, shoulder replacement grows, the risk of developing shoulder infection increases. When treated imperfectly, infection may cause devastating complications. Our goal is to help develop a universal measure to absolutely minimize post-surgical infection. Reducing complications adds value to patient experience and avoids the costly road of infection eradication. The bacterium (Proprionibacter Acnes) most commonly attributed to shoulder infection is a very unusual organism. Until recently, it was not properly recognized because it was so difficult to identify.

Now that one of the greatest bacterial offenders (in the shoulder) has been more clearly identified, we are looking for ways to prevent it from infecting patients. In our last study we took over three hundred cultures and studied them. After careful analysis, we were able to identify when (during surgery) patients are most susceptible to this bacterial infection and were able to determine just how frequently this bacteria is present. Now that we know when this bacterium may gain its access to patients, we are developing ways to attack it at the patient’s point of vulnerability.”

Paul Sethi, MD
Paul Sethi, MD
Katie Vadasdi, MD
Katie Vadasdi, MD
Timothy Greene, MD
Timothy Greene, MD

Sethi PM, Greene T, Vadasdi K, Miller S.  Incidence of P. Acnes Culture after Primary Shoulder Arthroscopy.  AOSSM Annual Meeting. Seattle, WA. July 2014

Posters are judged by the AOSSM Education Program Committee. With just three poster awards available, we congratulate our physicians on their research and 2nd place award.

ONS Foundation Awarded 2nd Place in AOSSM Poster Contest
ONS Foundation Awarded 2nd Place in AOSSM Poster Contest

For more information on the AOSSM Annual Meeting, please click here: http://www.sportsmed.org/Education/Meetings/Annual_Meeting_2014/2014_Annual_Meeting/

Program:
http://www.sportsmed.org/uploadedFiles/Content2/Education/Meetings/Annual_Meeting_2014/AOSSM%202014%20Final%20Program.pdf

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists PC (ONS) is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice in Greenwich, CT. ONS physicians provide expertise in sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopaedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, please visit www.onsmd.com.

 

 

Is tennis your game? Do you love the pace on the squash or paddle court?

RacketSportsTennisWoman If you love racket sports, you might already know what it’s like to experience a rolled ankle or shoulder strain. Injury prevention is the key to staying in the game and ONS is here to help you keep your swing healthy! On Tuesday, May 13th at 6:30 p.m. in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, come hear sports medicine physician Gloria Cohen, MD, orthopedic surgeon Katie Vadasdi, MD, physical therapist Tatyana Kalyuzhny, PT, DPT, MDT and Patrick Hirscht, Tennis Pro, Round Hill Club in Greenwich discuss how to avoid the most common injuries in racket sports like Achilles tendon tears, shoulder and wrist injuries and rolled and sprained ankles. Learn to recognize injury warning signs and know when it’s time to see a doctor. The panel will discuss injury prevention and the latest orthopedic treatments.

Dr. Katie Vadasdi, head of the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center shares her medical expertise and experience in treating these types of injuries saying “racket sports can lead to overuse injuries due to the repetitive motions required in these sports. We most commonly see shoulder and elbow injuries including impingement of the rotator cuff and inflammation of the tendons in the elbow also known as tennis elbow. Early in the season, it is important to gradually increase intensity and duration of play to reduce the risk of developing such overuse injuries. If an athlete develops pain, it is important to rest in order to allow for appropriate recovery.  This can often prevent the development of more serious injuries.  If pain persists in spite of rest, then an athlete should reach out to a medical professional for further diagnosis and management options”.

Come to the seminar to learn more! Seminar is free. Registration requested.

For more information on shoulder injuries/surgery click here!

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit https://onsmd.com/ or call 203.869.1145.

ONS Sports Medicine Specialist, Gloria Cohen, MD on Cycling Injuries

GloriaCohenbikingWEB_SMLike all activities engaged in regularly, cycling has its share of common ailments and injuries.  Many of the overuse injuries result from attempting to do too much, too soon. Poor riding technique, and improper frame fit for the individual may also cause injuries. Riding too many miles or tackling too many hills in too high a gear will stress the musculoskeletal system, especially at the start of the cycling season.

Knee pain is the most common complaint and is usually related to the tracking of the kneecap, or “patella” in the mid-groove of the thigh bone or “femur.”  The symptoms of “biker’s knee,” also known as “patellofemoral pain syndrome,” usually result from a combination of malalignment of the extensor mechanism of the knee, muscle imbalance, and improper set-up on the bike.  Each cyclist presents with differences in biomechanics (flat pronated feet, bow legs, etc.) and muscle conditioning (strength and flexibility) that can predispose to this condition.  It is important to avoid riding with high pedal resistance at a low cadence as this puts excessive pressure across the knee joint. The rule of the road is “if the knees hurt gear down.”

Some common riding errors are riding with the saddle too low or too far forward and poor foot position or improper cleat adjustment.  This can lead to other musculoskeletal injuries such as neck problems, or Achilles tendinitis.

We must not forget that traumatic injuries can occur when we least expect it. Wear an approved bicycle helmet at all times while cycling. Remember to replace your helmet if you are involved in a bike crash while wearing it. It will likely not perform for you the second time.

Gloria Cohen, MD is a specialist in non-operative sports medicine. She is a primary care team physician for the Columbia University varsity athletic teams and lecturer in the Department of Orthopaedics at Columbia University and served as team physician to the Canadian National Olympic Cycling Team for 14 years and was a member of the Canadian Medical Team for the Olympic Games in Seoul, Atlanta, and Sydney. She travels regularly with the Columbia University varsity football team, the Lions and is recognized as an authority in sports medicine in the United States and Canada.

Dr. Cohen believes in taking an integrative approach to medical management by considering a patients’ bio-mechanics, cardio-vascular and pulmonary function as it relates to athletic performance. Dr. Cohen is a successful competitive runner who has qualified twice for the New York Marathon. She is also an off-road and road cyclist and will be a featured speaker at Cycle Strong! A Sports Conditioning and Injury Prevention Workshop for Cycling Enthusiasts! This event is presented by ONS Foundation for Clinical Research, Inc. and sponsored by the North Castle Library, Armonk. For more information visit the ONS Foundation website.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit https://onsmd.com/ or call 203.869.1145.

ONS Knee Specialist Dr. Katie Vadasdi discusses Olympic Athlete Lindsey Vonn’s Injury

The ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center team of experts consists of current and former athletes and fitness enthusiasts who know firsthand what it takes to train and excel in a sport. With the 2014 Olympics just a few weeks away, ONS orthopedic surgeon and women’s sports medicine specialist, Katie Vadasdi, MD, shared her expert opinion on one of the latest setbacks in Olympic history.

DrVadasdi_WEB

In recent news, US skiing champion, and Olympic gold medalist Lindsey Vonn stated that she would be pulling out of the 2014 Sochi Olympics in Russia. The famed downhill skier experienced a series of knee injuries which led to her decision not compete.  When asked about Lindsey’s decision, Dr. Vadasdi said, “Vonn has made an appropriate but difficult decision to pull out of the winter Olympics this year in order to give her knee the medical attention it requires.  Her sport requires an incredible amount of strength and having an unstable knee puts her in a dangerous position where she might further injure her knee or cause other injuries.”

Last February, Lindsey tore two ligaments in her right knee and broke a bone in the same leg during an intense crash at the world championships. Upon returning to the sport, Vonn reinjured her surgically repaired ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) when she crashed during a training session. Two weeks later, Lindsey suffered another injury when she sprained her MCL (medial collateral ligament), during a downhill event. After reconstructive knee surgery in February 2013, Vonn posted on Facebook that she “is devastated” to miss the Olympics, “but the reality has sunk in that my knee is just too unstable to compete at this level.”

Each year, at least 1 in 3,000 Americans between the ages of 14 and 55 tear an ACL while exercising or playing sports.  Skiers are among the group of athletes who are more likely to experience an ACL injury. Dr. Vadasdi said of Vonn’s injury, “she will undergo ACL reconstruction which will provide her knee the stability it requires to return to such highly-competitive skiing.” A reconstructed ACL not only stabilizes the knee, but also prevents damage to the menisci cartilage that often occurs due to an unstable joint.

“By making the decision now to withdraw from the Olympics and to undergo the surgery, she will allow herself the necessary time to recover and fully rehab her knee to get her back on the slopes safely and at her height competitive level.”

To learn more about ACL Injuries, click here: https://onsmd.com/condition_treatment/acl-injuries/ and visit our Women’s Sports Medicine Center at https://onsmd.com/sports-medicine/womens-sports-medicine-center/.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com or call 203.869.1145.

 

Calendar of Health Information Programs by ONS Physicians at Greenwich Hospital

PROGRAMS CALENDAR 2014

This year the physicians at ONS will present health information seminars for the public on a variety of topics ranging from joint replacement to common soccer injuries, injury prevention and treatments. Sessions to take place in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich, and followed by a question and answer period where the public may pose questions to the presenters. To register for upcoming ONS programs at Greenwich Hospital, please call (203) 863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register on-line at http://www.greenhosp.org/.

2 APRIL 2014 – Joint Symposium, Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich <read more>

Past Topics

Knee Pain Seminar

Chichi_knee anatomy
For millions of Americans, knee pain is a daily reality. Many people try to ignore pain caused by arthritis in the knee joint for as long as possible in hopes that it will go away. However, arthritis is a progressive disease and for many, will even become debilitating. On December 3, 2013, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Demetris Delos presented a “Knee Pain Seminar” addressing treatment options for knee pain due to early-stage arthritis. He discussed non-operative and operative solutions from therapeutic injections, arthroscopic procedures to osteotomy and partial knee replacement. The seminar was free and open to the public.

Speaker: Orthopedic Surgeon Demetris Delos, MD

ONS is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice serving patients throughout Fairfield and Westchester Counties and the New York Metropolitan area. ONS physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com, or call (203) 869-1145.

Osteoporosis: Prevention, Treatment and Managementgraphic

Osteoporosis, a disease that weakens the bones and leads to fractures, affects 28 million Americans and contributes to an estimated 1.5 million bone fractures every year. Half of all women older than 65 and one in five men is affected by osteoporosis. On Wednesday, October 23, 2013 at 6:30 pm, physicians with ONS and Greenwich Hospital hosted a seminar on Osteoporosis: Prevention, Treatment and Management. The public was invited to hear from medical experts what measures may be taken to prevent bone loss or minimize its effects. Presenters included Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Endocrinologist Ranee Lleva, MD, and Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter. The program took place in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road and was free of charge. To register for ONS programs at Greenwich Hospital, please call (203) 863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register on-line at www.greenhosp.org. For more information on topics related to orthopedics, visit www.onsmd.com

Speakers: Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Endocrinologist Ranee Lleva, MD, and Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter. Wednesday, October 23, 6:30-8 pm

Cartilage Transplantation Offers New Hope for Damaged Knees

Delos Office Vertical
Dr. Demetris Delos

Cartilage transplantation offers exciting new treatment options for adults under the age of 50 who have had their knee damaged through acute or chronic trauma to the knee. The surgeon uses small cylindrical plugs of good cartilage and inserts them into the damaged areas. This procedure has been shown to be highly effective in patients who have sustained a specific injury to the knee cartilage or joint lining, and who have not yet developed arthritis. Many competitive athletes who have undergone the treatment have returned to their full performance level after surgery.

Speaker: Orthopaedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist Demetris Delos, MD

Women’s Sports Medicine Center forum at Greenwich Hospital

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Who would know better how to treat active women of all ages and levels of sports activity than the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center physician and physical therapy team?

In addition to being experts in their fields as orthopedic surgeons and sports medicine specialists, the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center team is comprised of current and former athletes and fitness enthusiasts who know first-hand what it takes to train and excel in a sport. (In fact, Dr. Katie Vadasdi, an orthopedic surgeon, is an accomplished tri-athlete who has completed two Ironman competitions, is an alpine climber and has ascended Mount Kilimanjaro, Mount Rainier and the Grand Teton.)

Come hear the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center panel discussion hosted by Greenwich Hospital:

“Women Treating Women”

The event, which took place in the Noble Conference Room at Greenwich Hospital, featured the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine experts in a panel discussion regarding the latest diagnostic and medical management techniques for injuries and conditions common in female athletes.

The public was invited to bring their sports injury or fitness-related questions and get answers from a team of physicians who have provided medical support to five Olympic Games, international biking and fencing championships, and medical coverage for the Columbia University sports teams and Greenwich High School sports.

Women’s Sports Medicine Panel:

Katie Vadasdi, MD, Orthopedic Surgeon, Sports Medicine Specialist Fellowship Training: Columbia University Medical Center

Gloria Cohen, MD, Primary Care Sports Medicine, Olympic Team Physician Post Graduate Sports Medicine, University of British Columbia

Tamar Kessel, MD, Physiatrist, Interventional Sports and Spine Fellowship Training: Hospital for Special Surgery

Laura Liebesman, PT, Director of ONS Physical Therapy Specialties- Golf mechanics, Orthopedics and Spine PT Certification – University of Pennsylvania

 

ONS Launches Women’s Sports Medicine Center

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Women’s Sports Medicine Panel

ONS is pleased to announce the opening of the Women’s Sports Medicine Center. The physician and physical therapy team—Katie Vadasdi, MD (Orthopedic Surgeon, Sports Medicine Specialist), Gloria Cohen, MD (Primary Care Sports Medicine Physician, Olympic team physician), Tamar Kessel, MD (Physiatrist, Interventional Sports and Spine) and Laura Liebesman, PT (Director of ONS Physical Therapy with PT specialties in golf mechanics, orthopedics and spine)—treats active women of all ages and levels of sports activity through a multidisciplinary and coordinated approach. In addition to being experts in their fields, the team consists of current and former athletes and fitness enthusiasts who know first-hand what it takes to train and excel in a sport.

“The Women’s Sports Medicine Center at ONS is about women treating women,” said
Dr. Vadasdi, an accomplished tri-athlete who has completed two Ironman competitions, is an alpine climber and has ascended Mount Kilimanjaro, Mount Rainier and the Grand Teton.

“We are female athletes and health care professionals, and we understand that female athletes have specific needs,” Vadasdi continued. “We gear our multi-disciplinary approach to address injury prevention and treatment, as well as health maintenance.”

The ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center specializes in the medical team concept to provide diagnoses for acute, sub-acute and chronic sports-related musculoskeletal complaints, including shoulder instability, rotator cuff tears, tennis/golf elbow, hip impingement, knee injuries, tendonitis, concussions, stress fractures and musical sprains and strains. The Center will also act as an advisory resource for women’s sports teams and treatments for individual players.

Katie Vadasdi, MD, Gloria Cohen, MD, Tamar Kessel, MD and Laura Liebesman, PT are available to speak at women’s organizations and wellness events, conferences, specialized clubs (e.g., running, swimming and figure-skating) and community centers. Selected topics include “Female Athlete Triad,” “Shin Splints and Stress Fractures,” “Injury and Prevention for the Female Cyclist,” “Exercise in Pregnancy and Postpartum,” “Dance Injuries: Readiness for Pointe,” “ACL Injury Prevention for Athletes” and “Back Pain and Spinal Stress Injuries.”

On Tuesday, November 5 at 6:30 p.m., Greenwich Hospitalwill host a Women’s Sports Medicine Forum, “Women Treating Women.” The event, which takes place in the Noble Conference Room, will feature the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine experts in a panel discussion regarding the latest diagnostic and medical management techniques for injuries and conditions common in female athletes.

The public is invited to bring their sports injury or fitness-related questions and get answers from a team of physicians who have provided medical support to five Olympic Games, international biking and fencing championships, and medical coverage for the Columbia University sports teams and Greenwich High School sports.

ONS is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice serving patients throughout Fairfield and Westchester Counties and the New York Metropolitan area. ONS physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com, or call (203) 869-1145