Accomplished Orthopedic Surgeon joins ONS Sports Medicine Team

Marc Kowalsky MDOrthopedic surgeon and fellowship trained sports medicine specialist Marc Kowalsky, MD has joined the ONS team. Dr. Kowalsky has expertise in conservative and operative treatments of upper and lower extremity sports injury, as well as complex shoulder and elbow pathology including degenerative disease, and trauma.  He has a particular interest in the management of shoulder and elbow arthritis, instability, rotator cuff tears, labral injury, and cartilage disorders.

Dr. Kowalsky looks for rehab-focused, non-operative solutions whenever possible, recommending surgery when it will be most effective. His goal is to return patients quickly, safely and fully to their best function and performance.

Dr. Kowalsky earned his medical degree at Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA where he also earned an MBA in Health Management. He did his residency in orthopedic surgery at Columbia University Medical Center, New York Orthopaedic Hospital in New York, NY. He also completed fellowship training in shoulder and elbow surgery at Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO and in sports medicine at Lenox Hill Hospital, Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine & Athletic Trauma, New York, NY.

He has authored original research manuscripts, review articles, and textbook chapters focusing on AC joint reconstruction, rotator cuff repair, and shoulder replacement. He currently serves as a reviewer for the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery and the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery.

“Dr. Kowalsky will be a great asset to our practice as we meet the growing demand for musculoskeletal care in Fairfield and Westchester counties,” said Dr. Seth Miller. “His high level of training and accomplishments reflect the ONS standard of offering the highest level of care possible to our patients.” He is in network with Aetna and Oxford/United Healthcare.

PRP: A step forward in regenerative medicine

Dr Kessel
Dr. Tamar Kessel, physiatrist, with a C-arm

Dr. Kessel is a physiatrist who specializes in non-operative treatments of musculoskeletal injuries and has an interest in the use of ultrasound to target medications to the precise location of tissue damage. One procedure that optimizes on ultrasound technology is the new and progressive treatment in regenerative medicine, PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma). Utilizing therapeutic injections, like PRP, has been shown to be safer and to greatly improve treatment results.  The treatment has even received significant attention from the media and has been used by members of the New York Giants along with other NFL players and elite athletes. Dr. Kessel is committed to providing the highest quality medical care and achieving the best outcomes for her patients.

PRP is a new treatment in regenerative medicine that uses the patient’s own blood and platelets to promote healing and helps the body optimize on its own natural processes. The patient’s own blood is drawn then placed in a centrifuge machine that separates the blood, leaving the platelet rich plasma ready to be removed. Afterwards, the PRP is placed right into the area of damage using ultrasound. Most people benefit from one injection but depending on the severity of the damage, it could take up to three. This method can help heal injuries including tendon/ligament injuries (Achilles Tendonitis), tennis elbow, cartilage loss, arthritis, and small tears (rotator cuff tears and meniscal injuries).

Note: Because PRP is given in the hopes of optimizing the initial inflammatory response of healing, anti-inflammatory medications should likely be stopped at the time of PRP treatment. Please consult your physician before any procedure.

Ready for Spring Sports?

Golfer

Foot and ankle, hand and wrist injury prevention tips by orthopedics specialists

When: February 25, 2015 at 6:30 p.m.
Where: Noble Auditorium, Greenwich Hospital
Speakers: Mark Yakavonis, MD, MMS, Mark Vitale, MD, and Paddle and Tennis Professional Patrick Hirscht

If golf or racket sports are in your plans for the spring you will want to hear tips from fellowship trained orthopedic foot and ankle specialist Mark Yakavonis, MD, MMS and fellowship trained hand/wrist/elbow specialist Mark Vitale, MD, MPH who will discuss common injuries seen in golf and racket sports. Special guest and local tennis pro Patrick Hirscht will also speak. Learn about common injuries, and how to choose footwear, braces and exercises to prevent injury and play your best; whether it’s the foot, hand, wrist or elbow, they’re all at risk for injury when you’re active. Dr. Yakavonis and Dr. Vitale will discuss nonsurgical and surgical treatments, along with ailments particular to racket sports. You will have the opportunity to ask questions at the conclusion of the talk. The program is free and open to the public. Registration Requested. Call (203) 863-4277 or register online at www.greenhosp.org.

07/10/2019

ONS Success Story: William McHale

William McHale TestimonialWilliam McHale started off as many other athletes did, full of energy and feeling invincible. As we all know, that feeling of invincibility is only a feeling. In the 7th grade, young William broke his ankle playing football; fortunately he was then referred to Dr. Paul Sethi.

Dr. Sethi considers all of the athlete’s needs which helps set the stage for a successful and timely recovery period and translates into an ideal patient-doctor experience.  When McHale got older, he started as a linebacker in 30 consecutive games between his sophomore and senior years at  Yale University. During his senior year though, the labrums in both of his shoulders tore. Time was of the essence if he wanted to recover in time for his Pro Day in front of NFL Scouts. Who did he contact? None other than our very own Dr. Sethi.

The MRIs originally taken of the injury did not reveal the full extent of the damage but Dr. Sethi corrected all issues encountered during the surgery. After the procedure, William was scheduled to go to physical therapy multiple times a week and overall, it took about six to seven months for a full recovery. Since then, William has not had any other issues regarding his shoulders.

Where is William McHale now? He played to his full potential on Pro Day, was invited to Minicamp with the New Orleans Saints, and just returned from playing football in France; congratulations!

Maximizing Your Child’s Athletic Potential: Expert Advice on Training Smarter and Preventing Injuries

Demetris Delos, MD
Demetris Delos, MD

When: Thursday, January 22, 2015, 7 -9 p.m.
Where: Greenwich Library, Cole Auditorium
Speakers: Demetris Delos, MD, Andy Barr and Mubarak Malik, moderator Allan Houston

Join the Junior League of Greenwich and the Greenwich Library for a discussion moderated by two-time NBA all-star Allan Houston and featuring a panel of experts from the NBA and NFL on the prevention of adolescent sports injuries. Former Knicks star and Greenwich resident Allan Houston is one of the NBA’s all-time greatest long range shooters, an Olympic gold medalist, current Assistant General Manager of the NY Knicks and spokesperson for the National Fatherhood Initiative.

Panelists include Andy Barr – Director of Performance and Rehab for the New York Knicks, Mubarak Malik – Head of Strength and Conditioning for the New York Knicks and Dr. Demetris Delos – orthopedic surgeon at ONS (Greenwich Hospital) and formerly of the NY Giants.

The Junior League of Greenwich and the Greenwich Library aim to educate parents about helping their kids reach their full physical and athletic potential. Admission is free but seats must be reserved online at www.greenwichlibrary.org.

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The Fragile Feet: A Gymnast Story (Part II)

Gymnast
Gymnast on balance beam.

Remember last week’s post? Surprisingly enough, gymnasts share a lot in common with ballerinas, especially in terms of injuries of the feet.

Both gymnasts and dancers place a tremendous amount of stress on their feet for a significant amount of time per week – often greater than 10 hours a day. Because of this combination of stress and time, stress fractures are common. Stress fractures can occur almost anywhere in the foot or ankle, but the most common locations are the metatarsals, navicular, tibia, calcaneus, and fibula. A key to avoiding stress fractures is proper nutrition, avoiding disturbances in the menstrual cycle, and proper technique and amount of training. A gymnast who trains 4 hours a week that increases the workload to 10 hours a week in preparation for a performance without any ramp up is a setup for stress fractures. A better way to ramp up training would be to increase the workload by approximately 25% per week, or going from 4 hours a week to 5 hours a week and so forth. The treatment of stress fractures varies depending on the location and character of the fractures. It also depends on the patients demands and expectations. In most situations a period of immobilization and rest is all that is necessary.

Young gymnasts often complain of various painful lumps and bumps on the feet. Some of these are calluses, which are the bodies response to repetitive force on areas of weight bearing. Another extra bone in the foot – the accessory navicular, also thought to exist in about 10% of all people – can be a troublemaker for gymnasts in particular. It is a tender prominence on the inside of the ankle. Flatfooted patients will sprain or strain the ligaments that attach to the accessory navicular. Continued activity worsens the symptoms and the first line treatment is a period of immobilization to allow it to heal. When that fails, the extra bone is excised, and the damaged tendons and ligaments on the inside of the ankle are repaired or reconstructed.

Many of the problems in both ballet and gymnastics results from the nature of the sports – long hours and repetition in little to no footwear. These patients are predisposed to develop certain problems based on the alignment or posture of the feet. Feet come in two general shapes – flat and high arched. In reality it is a spectrum. So many problems can be treated simply by accommodating or adjusting a patient’s flat or high arch with a specific type of shoe or insert (orthotic). Unfortunately, the competitive gymnast and dancer cannot wear athletic shoes or orthotics. Some may be able to train in orthotics or custom shoes and that is important to keep in mind.

Want to learn even more? Dr. Yakavonis will be giving a seminar on “Solutions for Foot and Ankle Pain: Beyond a Foot Massage.”  The program is free and open to the public. Registration Requested. Call (203) 863-4277 or register online at www.greenhosp.org.

The Fragile Feet: A Ballerina Story (Part I)

Ballerina
Ballerina in en pointe position

Dr. Yakavonis, MD, MMS, of ONS and Greenwich Hospital is an orthopedic surgeon specializing in foot and ankle surgery and treatments for adult foot conditions as well as youth sports injuries in field athletes, gymnasts and ballet dancers. He shares a two-part blog about conditions to be aware of for ballet dancers and gymnasts.

Ballet dancers feet are much like a musician’s handsthey earn a living with them. In addition to putting an amazing amount of stress on their feet, they also are often well below an ideal body weight – either because of the stress of an enormous amount of training or because of unrealistic expectations placed on them by the ballet community. This leads to several different and often unique foot and ankle conditions.

One fairly unique foot and ankle condition in ballet is caused by the en pointe position. In this position an enormous amount of strain is put on the dancer’s great toe, as it is essentially holding up the entire body weight through a small joint. The main flexor tendon of the toe, called the flexor hallicus longus – normally quite small, takes over the job of the largest tendon in the body, the Achilles. The flexor hallicus longus hypertrophies well in compensation for its new job, but unfortunately this tendon is forced through a tight tunnel in the back of the ankle. When it gets too large it will get pinched in the posterior ankle joint. Patients develop painful irritation of the bones and soft tissues in the posterior ankle. An extra bone in the posterior ankle called the os trigonum, which present in about 10% of all people, can be become very painful and irritated in many ballerinas. This constellation of problems is called posterior impingement of the ankle, and it is noticed by the patient as a vague deep pain in the posterior part of the ankle, in front of the Achilles, that is felt with plantarflexion, the position of pointing the foot and toes downward.

Ballet dancers suffer from numerous other problems of the foot & ankle, many of which are not unique. One of the less glamorous problems they deal with are corns, calluses, and blisters. These are necessary adaptations to allow a high level dancer to compete.

Similar to posterior impingement, which arises from dancers spending an inordinate amount of time and stress in an extreme position at the ankle, ballet dancers will develop anterior impingement at the ankle. This comes from repetitive forceful dorsiflexion – pulling the foot and toes upward, toward the shin. Landing from jumps and deep knee bends exacerbate this problem. Pain is felt in the anterior ankle.

Treatment for the above condition is customized to the patient. Often a minor activity modification, or period of rest, can dramatically improve the symptoms. Unfortunately, rest is not easy to come by in the competitive living of a gymnast. Many dancers will treat the symptoms with a combination of anti-inflammatory medications and occasional steroid injections in the region of maximal tenderness. Surgery is a last resort option for any ballerina – when symptoms persist for many months and are limiting, despite all other efforts. Surgery is typically very successful in these patients and can be done with arthroscopic or minimally invasive techniques.

The most common orthopaedic injury of all is also very common amongst ballet dancers: the lateral (traditional) ankle sprain. The mainstay of treatment for ankle sprains is rest, ice, compression, and elevation – mnemonic RICE. A short period of rest and immobilization (1-2 weeks) is followed by aggressive physical therapy, with strengthening of the muscles that stabilize the ankle. Recent research has pointed to improved short and long-term outcomes when early motion and weight bearing is initiated. There is promising early research on the role of stem cell injections – harvested from the patient’s own blood or bone marrow – in the setting of an acute ankle sprain. This is a technique we will offer for the highest level athletes and dancers in certain situations, understanding that the research data on this intervention is still in development.

… to be continued in the next segment, The Fragile Feet: A Gymnast Story (Part II)

Want to learn even more? Dr. Yakavonis will be giving a seminar on “Solutions for Foot and Ankle Pain: Beyond a Foot Massage.”  The program is free and open to the public. Registration Requested. Call (203) 863-4277 or register online at www.greenhosp.org.

07/10/2019

ONS Physiatrist, Christopher Sahler, MD on post New York City Marathon Tips for Runners

Christopher Sahler, MD
Christopher Sahler, MD

Christopher S. Sahler, MD of ONS is an interventional physiatrists specializing in sports medicine. His focus is non-operative treatment of musculoskeletal injuries, restoring proper function, reducing pain and promoting active lifestyles.

“Each year 50,000 people participate in the NYC marathon. If you are in that group and completed the race this past weekend, congratulations! It is an exciting accomplishment that you will remember for the rest of your life.

Now that the race is over, there are a few key points to remember that will help to maximize your recovery and minimize pain. Many athletes experience worsening soreness over the following days after the race. This is known as delayed onset muscle soreness and typically is most painful 48-72 hours later. After the race, your body is in a depleted state so it is important to take in plenty of water and healthy food. A combination of complex carbohydrates and protein help the muscles to repair themselves and re-build their energy stores. It is also recommended that you perform light, short duration activities such as walking, gentle jogging, biking, swimming etc. This helps to increase blood flow to the muscles and tissues that need the nutrients the most and helps to wash away the built up metabolic byproducts such as lactic acid. Gentle stretching and soaking in a warm bath may also help loosen up the muscles. Depending on your previous activity level, it is important to give your body time off before re-starting any intense exercise routines. Most runners should take at least one month off.

Congratulations again on the race!”

Dr. Sahler will present “Exercise as Treatment for Chronic Pain.” Learn how exercise can be used as a safe and effective treatment for chronic pain conditions. This free health seminar will be in the Noble Conference room at Greenwich Hospital Tuesday, December 2 at 6:00 p.m.  To register call 203-863-4277 or register online at https://www.greenhosp.org/CREG/ClassDetails.aspx?sid=1&ClassID=5348

 

ONS Orthopedic Surgeon Seth Miller, MD, Elected to Join Elite Medical Society

Seth Miller, MD
ONS Orthopaedic Surgeon, Seth Miller, MD

At the October Closed Meeting of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), held in Pinehurst, NC, ONS (Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists) orthopedic surgeon Dr. Seth Miller was elected to join the ASES organization.  “Membership in ASES is a privilege and an honor” said Dr. Jim Cunningham, ONS Vice President. Membership in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons is by invitation only. Only experienced orthopedic surgeons who have completed a fellowship in shoulder surgery, elbow surgery, and/or sports medicine are considered for membership.

Dr. Miller, in his 25th year in practice at ONS in Greenwich, has ascended quickly in his career being recognized with such a national honor.  Candidates must meet strict academic and clinical requirements to become members of ASES.

“ASES is a remarkable collection of like-minded surgeons, and researchers who, through their collaboration and the sharing of techniques and outcomes, work together to solve the most complicated and pressing shoulder and elbow disorders. Founded on the premise that by such sharing of ideas we can determine the most efficient, cost effective, high quality shoulder and elbow care” said Dr. Robert Bell, ASES President.

The American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons was created to enhance the study of Conditions_shouldershoulder and elbow surgery and to foster advances in the field, serving as an educational body responsible for scientific programs and advances.  The Mission of the ASES is to support the ethical practice of evidence-based, high quality, cost-effective, shoulder and elbow care.

The society global impact on quality shoulder and elbow care is achieved through leadership, medical education, scientific research, and patient advocacy. Congratulations to Dr. Miller on becoming an Associate Member of the society.

ONS is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice serving patients throughout Fairfield and Westchester Counties and the New York Metropolitan area. ONS physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com, or call (203) 869-1145.

Train Right, Run Free! ONS Physical Therapist Alicia Hirscht Shows Us how to Train for a Marathon

The ONS Foundation’s Annual 5K Run/Walk is coming up this Sunday, September 21st in Old Greenwich! ONS supporters, staff and former patients will participate in this fun-filled event. It would be great to see you all come down and enjoy a nice morning jog. Some of you may be casual joggers, others might want to participate in the local race circuit, or you might be training for the NYC Marathon.

ONS Senior Clinical Specialist Alicia Hirsch
ONS Senior Clinical Specialist Alicia Hirsch

Whether you are a casual runner, training for the marathon, or just someone who supports local causes with a 5K run…all runners are at risk of developing injuries if they are not training properly. A question I ask all my runners in the clinic is, “What else do you do for training, besides running?” More often than not, the answer is, “nothing” or “I stretch sometimes.”  What many runners do not know is that research has shown an effective leg and core strengthening program can reduce the incidence of hip, knee and ankle pain.

A proper program needs to have exercises specific for running: weight bearing on one leg, focused on shock absorbing muscle groups, and emphasizing hip and core strength. Many runners feel that stretching in their training can help prevent injury. However, many injuries occur because of inherent muscle weakness, not necessarily because of tightness.  To address this weakness, incorporate the exercises below into your routine: 3 times per week. Good luck with your training!

 

Hamstring Curls with the Ball:

1. Lie on your back with your legs up on a ball.

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2. Lift your hips, bend your knees and roll the ball in towards your buttocks.

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3. Roll the ball back out and lower your hips.

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One Legged Bridges:

1. Lie on your back with one knee bent, the other straight in the air.

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2. Pushing through the bent knee, lift your hips off the ground. Lower back down.

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Repeat: 3 sets of 15 reps on each leg.

 

 

 

 

 


Sideplanks:

1. Lie on your side, heels in line with your shoulders.

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2. Supporting yourself on your elbow, lift your body off the ground. Lower back down, repeat:

 

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3. Lower back down, repeat:

 

 

 

Hip Dips:

 1. Stand on your left leg only.

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2. Let your trunk bend forward while extending your right leg straight back. Let your arms fall freely, keep your left knee slightly bent. Keep your stomach muscles tight and your back in neutral, bend through your hip.

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3. Return to start position, repeat: 2 sets of 15 reps on each leg.

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One Legged Heel Raises:

1. Stand off the edge of a step, letting your heel hang below the step.

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2. Push up onto your toes. Lower back down slowly.

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Repeat: 3 sets of 15 reps on each leg.


Lateral Squats:

1. Stand sideways on a step.

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2. Sit your hips back and bend your knee, lowering your opposite leg to the ground. Do not let your knee fall inward and do not let it bend past your toes.

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3. Lift back up and repeat: 2 sets of 15 reps


Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists PC (ONS)
is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice in Greenwich, CT. ONS physicians provide expertise in sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopaedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, please visit www.onsmd.com.

ONS Orthopedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist, Timothy Greene, MD Gives Insight on Paul George Injury

Time Greene, MDTeam USA’s scrimmage this past Friday night was definitely one to remember; and not in a good way. ONS Orthopedic Surgeon and fellowship trained Sports Medicine Specialist, Timothy Greene, MD, gives us some insight on NBA Super Star, Paul George’s gruesome injury that caused jaws to drop and made an entire arena become strikingly silent.

“NBA star Paul George sustained a gruesome leg injury during Friday night’s Team USA basketball game in Las Vegas. While trying to contest a layup, George’s leg hit the basketball stanchion causing an open tibia/fibular fracture. The injury consists of a complete break of the shin bone and small bone in the lowerleg that penetrates through the skin. When the bone penetrates the skin, there is an increased risk of infection and thus an urgent surgery was preformed the night of the incident to clean and repair the ends of the bone and skin and place a rod in the shin bone.

The road to recovery will most likely be a long one for the NBA superstar. When the bone penetrates the skin, it increases the time for healing. Studies examining these types of injury show that it can take up to 6 months to get complete healing of the bone. Although we often see our professional athlete’s recover and return to a high level of play in a surprisingly rapid timeframe, it is not unreasonable to expect that Paul George may take an entire year to return to elite level basketball.”

To learn more about the incident, read this article by The Huffington Post.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists PC (ONS) is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice in Greenwich, CT. ONS physicians provide expertise in sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopaedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, please visit www.onsmd.com. 

Is tennis your game? Do you love the pace on the squash or paddle court?

RacketSportsTennisWoman If you love racket sports, you might already know what it’s like to experience a rolled ankle or shoulder strain. Injury prevention is the key to staying in the game and ONS is here to help you keep your swing healthy! On Tuesday, May 13th at 6:30 p.m. in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, come hear sports medicine physician Gloria Cohen, MD, orthopedic surgeon Katie Vadasdi, MD, physical therapist Tatyana Kalyuzhny, PT, DPT, MDT and Patrick Hirscht, Tennis Pro, Round Hill Club in Greenwich discuss how to avoid the most common injuries in racket sports like Achilles tendon tears, shoulder and wrist injuries and rolled and sprained ankles. Learn to recognize injury warning signs and know when it’s time to see a doctor. The panel will discuss injury prevention and the latest orthopedic treatments.

Dr. Katie Vadasdi, head of the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center shares her medical expertise and experience in treating these types of injuries saying “racket sports can lead to overuse injuries due to the repetitive motions required in these sports. We most commonly see shoulder and elbow injuries including impingement of the rotator cuff and inflammation of the tendons in the elbow also known as tennis elbow. Early in the season, it is important to gradually increase intensity and duration of play to reduce the risk of developing such overuse injuries. If an athlete develops pain, it is important to rest in order to allow for appropriate recovery.  This can often prevent the development of more serious injuries.  If pain persists in spite of rest, then an athlete should reach out to a medical professional for further diagnosis and management options”.

Come to the seminar to learn more! Seminar is free. Registration requested.

For more information on shoulder injuries/surgery click here!

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit https://onsmd.com/ or call 203.869.1145.

ONS Sports Medicine Specialist, Gloria Cohen, MD on Cycling Injuries

GloriaCohenbikingWEB_SMLike all activities engaged in regularly, cycling has its share of common ailments and injuries.  Many of the overuse injuries result from attempting to do too much, too soon. Poor riding technique, and improper frame fit for the individual may also cause injuries. Riding too many miles or tackling too many hills in too high a gear will stress the musculoskeletal system, especially at the start of the cycling season.

Knee pain is the most common complaint and is usually related to the tracking of the kneecap, or “patella” in the mid-groove of the thigh bone or “femur.”  The symptoms of “biker’s knee,” also known as “patellofemoral pain syndrome,” usually result from a combination of malalignment of the extensor mechanism of the knee, muscle imbalance, and improper set-up on the bike.  Each cyclist presents with differences in biomechanics (flat pronated feet, bow legs, etc.) and muscle conditioning (strength and flexibility) that can predispose to this condition.  It is important to avoid riding with high pedal resistance at a low cadence as this puts excessive pressure across the knee joint. The rule of the road is “if the knees hurt gear down.”

Some common riding errors are riding with the saddle too low or too far forward and poor foot position or improper cleat adjustment.  This can lead to other musculoskeletal injuries such as neck problems, or Achilles tendinitis.

We must not forget that traumatic injuries can occur when we least expect it. Wear an approved bicycle helmet at all times while cycling. Remember to replace your helmet if you are involved in a bike crash while wearing it. It will likely not perform for you the second time.

Gloria Cohen, MD is a specialist in non-operative sports medicine. She is a primary care team physician for the Columbia University varsity athletic teams and lecturer in the Department of Orthopaedics at Columbia University and served as team physician to the Canadian National Olympic Cycling Team for 14 years and was a member of the Canadian Medical Team for the Olympic Games in Seoul, Atlanta, and Sydney. She travels regularly with the Columbia University varsity football team, the Lions and is recognized as an authority in sports medicine in the United States and Canada.

Dr. Cohen believes in taking an integrative approach to medical management by considering a patients’ bio-mechanics, cardio-vascular and pulmonary function as it relates to athletic performance. Dr. Cohen is a successful competitive runner who has qualified twice for the New York Marathon. She is also an off-road and road cyclist and will be a featured speaker at Cycle Strong! A Sports Conditioning and Injury Prevention Workshop for Cycling Enthusiasts! This event is presented by ONS Foundation for Clinical Research, Inc. and sponsored by the North Castle Library, Armonk. For more information visit the ONS Foundation website.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit https://onsmd.com/ or call 203.869.1145.

Looks like more snow is in the forecast, we have some skiing tips for you!

skierThe knee is the most vulnerable body part for any athlete, including skiers. Downhill skiing produces large amounts of torque on the knee, challenging the integrity of ligaments and tendons. Whether from a fall or overuse, the most common injuries in skiers are tears to the MCL (Medial Collateral Ligament) or ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament), two important structures that give our knee stability.  When a skier is thrown off balance, his skis will sometimes shoot out in front of him, creating extra torque on the knees and damaging our stabilizing structures.

Both novice and experienced skiers are at risk of hurting their knees. We frequently see novice skiers hurt themselves when they do not know how to turn, stop or fall properly. Taking lessons and working with an instructor goes a long way in preventing knee injuries for beginner skiers. Experienced skiers frequently take risks and assume that they can manage faster speeds on any slope.  Many injuries, whether you are a beginner or an experienced skier, are related to weather conditions. It is important to realize that as visibility and surface conditions deteriorate, the slope or trail level goes up. In poor visibility or icy conditions, a beginner trail becomes an intermediate trail, and an intermediate slope becomes advanced slope. Keep injury prevention in mind, if the conditions are difficult, ski down a level.

A second reason injuries occur is fatigue. Most skiers’ bodies are not accustomed to exercising 6-8 straight hours. In addition, many skiers push their bodies to take advantage of the whole day, even when they start to feel tired and stiff.  For this reason, injuries tend to happen at the end of the day.

Having the knowledge of what places skiers at a higher risk for knee injuries, we are passing on recommendations about how to stay safe on the slopes.  Both beginners and experienced skiers can benefit from these tips!

  1. Start a conditioning program a few months before your first ski trip. Leg strengthening, flexibility and balance are important aspects of an adequate ski conditioning program.
  2. Ski with good technique. Maintain your balance and control, keep your hips above your knees, keep your arms forward, and maintain a safe speed.
  3. Learn how to fall correctly: keep your legs together, keep your chin to your chest and your arms up and forward.
  4. Pay attention to weather conditions and remember to ski down a level if conditions deteriorate.
  5. Listen to your body. If you start to feel pain or stiffness upon exiting the lift chair, then you should probably make that run your last. Head to the lodge and enjoy a warm drink by the fire.

Good luck and stay warm!

If you become injured, while skiing, remember, ONS sports medicine physicians are trained at the top universities and hospitals in the country and have expertise in the latest treatments for sports-related injuries in high-performance and recreational athletes.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit https://onsmd.com/ or call 203.869.1145.

 

ONS Knee Specialist Dr. Katie Vadasdi discusses Olympic Athlete Lindsey Vonn’s Injury

The ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center team of experts consists of current and former athletes and fitness enthusiasts who know firsthand what it takes to train and excel in a sport. With the 2014 Olympics just a few weeks away, ONS orthopedic surgeon and women’s sports medicine specialist, Katie Vadasdi, MD, shared her expert opinion on one of the latest setbacks in Olympic history.

DrVadasdi_WEB

In recent news, US skiing champion, and Olympic gold medalist Lindsey Vonn stated that she would be pulling out of the 2014 Sochi Olympics in Russia. The famed downhill skier experienced a series of knee injuries which led to her decision not compete.  When asked about Lindsey’s decision, Dr. Vadasdi said, “Vonn has made an appropriate but difficult decision to pull out of the winter Olympics this year in order to give her knee the medical attention it requires.  Her sport requires an incredible amount of strength and having an unstable knee puts her in a dangerous position where she might further injure her knee or cause other injuries.”

Last February, Lindsey tore two ligaments in her right knee and broke a bone in the same leg during an intense crash at the world championships. Upon returning to the sport, Vonn reinjured her surgically repaired ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) when she crashed during a training session. Two weeks later, Lindsey suffered another injury when she sprained her MCL (medial collateral ligament), during a downhill event. After reconstructive knee surgery in February 2013, Vonn posted on Facebook that she “is devastated” to miss the Olympics, “but the reality has sunk in that my knee is just too unstable to compete at this level.”

Each year, at least 1 in 3,000 Americans between the ages of 14 and 55 tear an ACL while exercising or playing sports.  Skiers are among the group of athletes who are more likely to experience an ACL injury. Dr. Vadasdi said of Vonn’s injury, “she will undergo ACL reconstruction which will provide her knee the stability it requires to return to such highly-competitive skiing.” A reconstructed ACL not only stabilizes the knee, but also prevents damage to the menisci cartilage that often occurs due to an unstable joint.

“By making the decision now to withdraw from the Olympics and to undergo the surgery, she will allow herself the necessary time to recover and fully rehab her knee to get her back on the slopes safely and at her height competitive level.”

To learn more about ACL Injuries, click here: https://onsmd.com/condition_treatment/acl-injuries/ and visit our Women’s Sports Medicine Center at https://onsmd.com/sports-medicine/womens-sports-medicine-center/.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com or call 203.869.1145.

 

Calendar of Health Information Programs by ONS Physicians at Greenwich Hospital

PROGRAMS CALENDAR 2014

This year the physicians at ONS will present health information seminars for the public on a variety of topics ranging from joint replacement to common soccer injuries, injury prevention and treatments. Sessions to take place in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich, and followed by a question and answer period where the public may pose questions to the presenters. To register for upcoming ONS programs at Greenwich Hospital, please call (203) 863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register on-line at http://www.greenhosp.org/.

2 APRIL 2014 – Joint Symposium, Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich <read more>

Past Topics

Knee Pain Seminar

Chichi_knee anatomy
For millions of Americans, knee pain is a daily reality. Many people try to ignore pain caused by arthritis in the knee joint for as long as possible in hopes that it will go away. However, arthritis is a progressive disease and for many, will even become debilitating. On December 3, 2013, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Demetris Delos presented a “Knee Pain Seminar” addressing treatment options for knee pain due to early-stage arthritis. He discussed non-operative and operative solutions from therapeutic injections, arthroscopic procedures to osteotomy and partial knee replacement. The seminar was free and open to the public.

Speaker: Orthopedic Surgeon Demetris Delos, MD

ONS is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice serving patients throughout Fairfield and Westchester Counties and the New York Metropolitan area. ONS physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com, or call (203) 869-1145.

Osteoporosis: Prevention, Treatment and Managementgraphic

Osteoporosis, a disease that weakens the bones and leads to fractures, affects 28 million Americans and contributes to an estimated 1.5 million bone fractures every year. Half of all women older than 65 and one in five men is affected by osteoporosis. On Wednesday, October 23, 2013 at 6:30 pm, physicians with ONS and Greenwich Hospital hosted a seminar on Osteoporosis: Prevention, Treatment and Management. The public was invited to hear from medical experts what measures may be taken to prevent bone loss or minimize its effects. Presenters included Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Endocrinologist Ranee Lleva, MD, and Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter. The program took place in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road and was free of charge. To register for ONS programs at Greenwich Hospital, please call (203) 863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register on-line at www.greenhosp.org. For more information on topics related to orthopedics, visit www.onsmd.com

Speakers: Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Endocrinologist Ranee Lleva, MD, and Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter. Wednesday, October 23, 6:30-8 pm

Cartilage Transplantation Offers New Hope for Damaged Knees

Delos Office Vertical
Dr. Demetris Delos

Cartilage transplantation offers exciting new treatment options for adults under the age of 50 who have had their knee damaged through acute or chronic trauma to the knee. The surgeon uses small cylindrical plugs of good cartilage and inserts them into the damaged areas. This procedure has been shown to be highly effective in patients who have sustained a specific injury to the knee cartilage or joint lining, and who have not yet developed arthritis. Many competitive athletes who have undergone the treatment have returned to their full performance level after surgery.

Speaker: Orthopaedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist Demetris Delos, MD

Women’s Sports Medicine Center forum at Greenwich Hospital

WSMC group photo cu

Who would know better how to treat active women of all ages and levels of sports activity than the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center physician and physical therapy team?

In addition to being experts in their fields as orthopedic surgeons and sports medicine specialists, the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center team is comprised of current and former athletes and fitness enthusiasts who know first-hand what it takes to train and excel in a sport. (In fact, Dr. Katie Vadasdi, an orthopedic surgeon, is an accomplished tri-athlete who has completed two Ironman competitions, is an alpine climber and has ascended Mount Kilimanjaro, Mount Rainier and the Grand Teton.)

Come hear the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center panel discussion hosted by Greenwich Hospital:

“Women Treating Women”

The event, which took place in the Noble Conference Room at Greenwich Hospital, featured the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine experts in a panel discussion regarding the latest diagnostic and medical management techniques for injuries and conditions common in female athletes.

The public was invited to bring their sports injury or fitness-related questions and get answers from a team of physicians who have provided medical support to five Olympic Games, international biking and fencing championships, and medical coverage for the Columbia University sports teams and Greenwich High School sports.

Women’s Sports Medicine Panel:

Katie Vadasdi, MD, Orthopedic Surgeon, Sports Medicine Specialist Fellowship Training: Columbia University Medical Center

Gloria Cohen, MD, Primary Care Sports Medicine, Olympic Team Physician Post Graduate Sports Medicine, University of British Columbia

Tamar Kessel, MD, Physiatrist, Interventional Sports and Spine Fellowship Training: Hospital for Special Surgery

Laura Liebesman, PT, Director of ONS Physical Therapy Specialties- Golf mechanics, Orthopedics and Spine PT Certification – University of Pennsylvania