14 Doctors from ONS included in Greenwich Magazine’s Top Doctors list

When you need the name of a good doctor, ask another doctor.  As a means to that end, each year Moffly Media asks Castle Connolly, the physician-led medical research team that vets doctors nationwide, to provide a list of top physicians in Fairfield County for their annual Top Doctors list. The January 2013 Top Doctors issue of Greenwich, Stamford, New Canaan/ Darien and Westport Magazines contains information on over 323 doctors in 48 medical specialties.  This year’s list includes 14 doctors from Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) in Greenwich Office Park:  neurosurgeons – Paul Apostolides, MD, Mark Camel, MD, Amory Fiore, MD and Scott Simon, MD; orthopedic surgeons – Michael Clain, MD; James Cunningham, MD; John F. Crowe, MD; Frank Ennis, MD Steven Hindman, MD; Brian Kavanagh, MD; Seth Miller, MD; David Nocek, MD; and Paul Sethi, MD; physiatrist – Jeffrey Heftler, MD.

“Once again, we are proud to have so many of our skilled physicians recognized in this year’s Top Doctors lists,” said Dr. Seth Miller.  “Our doctors are among the very best in the country. Each has been hand-picked for their superior credentials and experience”

Each year Castle Connolly’s experts ask medical leaders across the country to identify physicians they believe to be the best in their respective fields. The nominees’ credentials, including educational and professional experience, are then carefully screened and the list compiled.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com or call (203) 869-1145.

Calendar of Health Information Programs by ONS Physicians at Greenwich Hospital

PROGRAMS CALENDAR 2014

This year the physicians at ONS will present health information seminars for the public on a variety of topics ranging from joint replacement to common soccer injuries, injury prevention and treatments. Sessions to take place in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich, and followed by a question and answer period where the public may pose questions to the presenters. To register for upcoming ONS programs at Greenwich Hospital, please call (203) 863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register on-line at http://www.greenhosp.org/.

2 APRIL 2014 – Joint Symposium, Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich <read more>

Past Topics

Knee Pain Seminar

Chichi_knee anatomy
For millions of Americans, knee pain is a daily reality. Many people try to ignore pain caused by arthritis in the knee joint for as long as possible in hopes that it will go away. However, arthritis is a progressive disease and for many, will even become debilitating. On December 3, 2013, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Demetris Delos presented a “Knee Pain Seminar” addressing treatment options for knee pain due to early-stage arthritis. He discussed non-operative and operative solutions from therapeutic injections, arthroscopic procedures to osteotomy and partial knee replacement. The seminar was free and open to the public.

Speaker: Orthopedic Surgeon Demetris Delos, MD

ONS is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice serving patients throughout Fairfield and Westchester Counties and the New York Metropolitan area. ONS physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com, or call (203) 869-1145.

Osteoporosis: Prevention, Treatment and Managementgraphic

Osteoporosis, a disease that weakens the bones and leads to fractures, affects 28 million Americans and contributes to an estimated 1.5 million bone fractures every year. Half of all women older than 65 and one in five men is affected by osteoporosis. On Wednesday, October 23, 2013 at 6:30 pm, physicians with ONS and Greenwich Hospital hosted a seminar on Osteoporosis: Prevention, Treatment and Management. The public was invited to hear from medical experts what measures may be taken to prevent bone loss or minimize its effects. Presenters included Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Endocrinologist Ranee Lleva, MD, and Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter. The program took place in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road and was free of charge. To register for ONS programs at Greenwich Hospital, please call (203) 863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register on-line at www.greenhosp.org. For more information on topics related to orthopedics, visit www.onsmd.com

Speakers: Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Endocrinologist Ranee Lleva, MD, and Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter. Wednesday, October 23, 6:30-8 pm

Cartilage Transplantation Offers New Hope for Damaged Knees

Delos Office Vertical
Dr. Demetris Delos

Cartilage transplantation offers exciting new treatment options for adults under the age of 50 who have had their knee damaged through acute or chronic trauma to the knee. The surgeon uses small cylindrical plugs of good cartilage and inserts them into the damaged areas. This procedure has been shown to be highly effective in patients who have sustained a specific injury to the knee cartilage or joint lining, and who have not yet developed arthritis. Many competitive athletes who have undergone the treatment have returned to their full performance level after surgery.

Speaker: Orthopaedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist Demetris Delos, MD

Women’s Sports Medicine Center forum at Greenwich Hospital

WSMC group photo cu

Who would know better how to treat active women of all ages and levels of sports activity than the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center physician and physical therapy team?

In addition to being experts in their fields as orthopedic surgeons and sports medicine specialists, the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center team is comprised of current and former athletes and fitness enthusiasts who know first-hand what it takes to train and excel in a sport. (In fact, Dr. Katie Vadasdi, an orthopedic surgeon, is an accomplished tri-athlete who has completed two Ironman competitions, is an alpine climber and has ascended Mount Kilimanjaro, Mount Rainier and the Grand Teton.)

Come hear the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center panel discussion hosted by Greenwich Hospital:

“Women Treating Women”

The event, which took place in the Noble Conference Room at Greenwich Hospital, featured the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine experts in a panel discussion regarding the latest diagnostic and medical management techniques for injuries and conditions common in female athletes.

The public was invited to bring their sports injury or fitness-related questions and get answers from a team of physicians who have provided medical support to five Olympic Games, international biking and fencing championships, and medical coverage for the Columbia University sports teams and Greenwich High School sports.

Women’s Sports Medicine Panel:

Katie Vadasdi, MD, Orthopedic Surgeon, Sports Medicine Specialist Fellowship Training: Columbia University Medical Center

Gloria Cohen, MD, Primary Care Sports Medicine, Olympic Team Physician Post Graduate Sports Medicine, University of British Columbia

Tamar Kessel, MD, Physiatrist, Interventional Sports and Spine Fellowship Training: Hospital for Special Surgery

Laura Liebesman, PT, Director of ONS Physical Therapy Specialties- Golf mechanics, Orthopedics and Spine PT Certification – University of Pennsylvania

 

Golf Advice For US Open Championship Fans

Golf may be perceived as a low risk sport, but it is physically demanding and golf related injuries are increasing.

Another great stretch to do before and during play.
A great stretch to do before and during play.

If watching the US Open Championship has inspired you to head for the links, here are a few exercises for golfers to ensure an injury free day on the course and to get the most out of your summer golf! The pros do it, you should too!

Golf advice for US Open Championship fans!

1. Train by repetitive motor learning specific to golf. Example: long distance runners are not trained by sprinting.

2. Never separate the torso from the hips while swinging.

3. For a more beneficial aerobic workout, walk outside, NOT on a treadmill.

4. Improving flexibility will result in fewer injuries, swing consistency, improved distance through less compensation and greater power.

5. Remember to stretch AFTER you warm-up your muscles.

6. To achieve a more powerful swing, strengthen your core through resistance training, yoga and Pilates.

7. Avoid surgery by taking care of your body on and off the course through exercise, healthy diet habits and minimizing stress.

8. Wrist weakness and radiating forearm pain could be “golfers elbow.” Be sure to maintain proper form and resist the temptation to play too much. REST is the best treatment for this injury.

9. Swimming, biking and using the elliptical machine are three of the most effective cross-training exercises.

10. When picking up your ball, always remember to bend with your knees.

Most IMPORTANTLY: Listen to your body and don’t play if you’re experiencing pain or are tired. If something is beginning to hurt, get it checked out.

– See more at: https://onsmd.com/2012/07/02/golf-hazards-and-injury-prevention/#sthash.pKnTk8as.dpuf

Golf Hazards and Injury Prevention

ONS PT Chalon Lefebvre demonstrates an effective golf stretch.

Often perceived as a low risk sport, golf is actually physically demanding and injuries from golf are on the rise.

One study showed that during a two-year period, 60 percent of golf professionals and 40 of amateurs suffered either a traumatic or overuse injury while golfing. Over 80 percent of the reported injuries were related to overuse.

“Many golfers incur injuries to the back, wrist, elbow and other joints,” says John Crowe, M.D., who specializes in treating hand and wrist conditions. “Newer players are often hurt because of poor mechanics, but avid golfers with years of experience frequently suffer from overuse injuries. As with many activities that involve repetitive movements, joint wear and tear is a major concern. Also the combined twisting of the spine and the torque that is absorbed in the hands while swinging and hitting the ball can create ideal conditions for injury.”

ONS physicians treat a wide variety of conditions in professional and amateur golfers. Of the aches and pains that commonly afflict golfers, low back pain is the most common injury or complaint in both groups. The rotation of the spine as a golfer swings his club toward the ball places considerable strain on the spine and surrounding muscles in the back. Players who lack ideal flexibility and strength are at particular risk for back strain, but professionals too are at risk due to the regular high demands imposed on their bodies. Most back/spine problems can be corrected by adjusting the dynamics of the players swing, anti-inflammatory medications or other conservative treatments.

Another great stretch to do before and during play.

Second to low back injuries are upper extremities injuries. A golfer’s wrist is particularly vulnerable to injury from overuse or poor wrist control during the swing. Unexpected accidents may also cause injury like swinging at a ball in high grass and colliding with a tree root.

Try these 10 helpful tips!

1. Train by repetitive motor learning specific to golf. Example: long distance runners are not trained by sprinting.

2. Never separate the torso from the hips while swinging.

3. For a more beneficial aerobic workout, walk outside, NOT on a treadmill.

4. Improving flexibility will result in fewer injuries, swing consistency, improved distance through less compensation and greater power.

5. Remember to stretch AFTER you warm-up your muscles.

6. To achieve a more powerful swing, strengthen your core through resistance training, yoga and Pilates.

7. Avoid surgery by taking care of your body on and off the course through exercise, healthy diet habits and minimizing stress.

8. Wrist weakness and radiating forearm pain could be “golfers elbow.” Be sure to maintain proper form and resist the temptation to play too much. REST is the best treatment for this injury.

9. Swimming, biking and using the elliptical machine are three of the most effective cross-training exercises.

10. When picking up your ball, always remember to bend with your knees.

11. Listen to your body and don’t play if you’re experiencing pain or are tired. If something is beginning to hurt, get it checked out.

Get a grip on Tennis Elbow

Physical therapist Tatyana Kalyuzhny, DPT does therapy to relieve symptoms of tennis elbow.

 

Physical Therapist stresses strength building, flexibility and good mechanics

Along with the fun and friendly competition of a great game of tennis, comes the potential for tennis elbow, a degenerative condition of the tendon fibers which anchor the arm muscles used to extend or lift the wrist and hand. Those who suffer from tennis elbow will tell you that it can result in an abrupt end to your tennis season. Below, Tatyana Kalyuzhny, DPT, of ONS Physical Therapy offers the following precautions and tips on conditioning before you even make your first serve.

Tennis elbow

Symptoms of tennis elbow often include persistent pain on the outside of the elbow. It usually begins with mild pain and can continue for weeks or months. The pain can be increased by pressing on the outside of the elbow or by a gripping or lifting motion. In severe cases, minimal movement of the elbow joint can send pain radiating into the forearm.

The first line of treatment for tennis elbow is usually rest, ice and anti-inflammatory medication. After an evaluation, a doctor may prescribe a physical therapy program to stretch and strengthen the muscles in forearm.

Players who lack proper conditioning are the ones who are most vulnerable to most injuries including tennis elbow. Even if you’re a great player with a beautiful swing, if you lack proper conditioning and core strength, you are putting your body at an increased risk for injury. Proper mechanics plays a crucial role in avoiding injuries. The slightest amount of improper alignment can place added stress on tendons and ligaments. You may not notice the ill effects initially, but damage may be cumulative and build to a problem over time.

Conditioning for tennis should include exercises in core and hip strength in multi-directional planes, exercises to strengthen the rotator cuff and elbow and eccentric strengthening, which involves contracting the muscles while simultaneously elongating them to help the body absorb shock. In addition to strengthening, players need to maintain flexibility of their calves, hips and shoulders for proper mechanical efficiency.

A good warm-up for a tennis player should include light stretching followed by a gentle, five- to ten- minute rally session on court that employs some lateral and forward shuffles. Warm-up should be gradual and should aim to slowly increase your heart rate and get the muscles ready for play. You should avoid walking onto the court and swinging with full power at the ball.

 Six tips for preventing injuries

  •  Use proper technique. Have your swing and overall technique evaluated periodically by a professional.
  •  Incorporate a proper strengthening and conditioning program off the court.
  •  Maintain flexibility by stretching after play.
  •  Use proper equipment. Play with a racket that is the correct size, grip and weight for you.
  •  Wear proper footwear designed for tennis and not worn out.
  •  Avoid making sudden radical changes in your technique unless instructed by a professional.

Getting ready to run the NYC Marathon?

Read Last Minute Tips from ONS Physical Therapist Abigail Ramsey, DPT

 

  • NO need to run now…  There‘s no gain to running at

    this point.  You can do light spinning on a bike to keep your legs moving.  If you absolutely need to run, do a light jog for 20-30 minutes on Friday.  Be sure to Rest on Saturday!

  • When you pick up your bib, don’t get caught up walking and standing too much, and be selective when trying the free supplements and energy bars available. You can throw off your nutrition if something doesn’t sit right with your stomach!
  • Wear layers! You can always shed a layer, but you don’t want to freeze while waiting at the start. If you do an active warm up, remember you are going to be in the starting corrals for a while. Don’t warm up to the point where you’re perspiring, as you run the risk of getting cold while you wait.
  • Do not change your diet!  Eat exactly what and when you’d normally eat before your long training runs.  Be sure to pack an extra Gel shot in case you lose one.
  • Use the medical tents if needed!  If you have a minor problem you can check into the tent, get the help you need like stretching, ice etc, and be on your way again.
  • Forward Motion! If you have an ache it’s ok to walk a little if needed.
  • Beware of eating the handouts on the course.  They are generous but you don’t know how your stomach will respond unless you have used that exact item during your training.

 

Post Marathon:

  • Ice trouble areas.
  • Keep Moving!   Active recovery will make the next few days easier!
  • Spin on a bike using little to no resistance for 10-20 min to get your legs moving. You’re going to feel tight and sore but you will feel looser when finished.
  • If you work at a desk the next couple of days be sure to stand up every 20-30 min and move around.
  • Gentle stretching will help loosen up your muscles!

 

 

How to avoid work-related neck injury

ONS Physicial Therapist Alicia Hirscht, DPT

ONS Physical Therapist Alicia Hirscht offers the following advice on prevention of neck pain and injury:

With the rise of computer-based occupations, it is now estimated that 60 to 70% of desk workers experience neck pain on a yearly basis. Static neck positions and poor workplace design are two of the biggest factors contributing to neck pain and injury. Following are some guidelines to help reduce the risk of neck pain:

  1. Make sure your computer screen is directly in front of you, and that you are able to look straight at it, not down. If you have a laptop, consider placing it on a riser and using an external keyboard.  Position your keyboard close, so that you do not have to reach with your arms. Try to keep your trunk in a neutral posture, with a lumbar support at the base of your spine. Use a headset or speakerphone instead of holding the phone to your ear with your shoulder.
  2. Get up and move frequently. Standing for a minute or two, every 30 minutes, is a good way to redistribute the forces in your neck and avoid reaching the threshold of pain and injury.
  3. Exercise regularly to improve your overall neck health. Performing a routine of simple exercises, 3 times a week that includes strengthening for your upper back and stretching your chest and shoulders, can help minimize your risk of pain and injury.

    Exercises to help prevent neck injury

    1. Anchor the band in your office door. Pull back with your elbows bent, squeezing your shoulder blades together and opening up your chest. Repeat 2 sets of 15 repetitions.
2. Hold the band at your waist with your elbows bent and tucked into your sides. Rotate your hands outward, squeezing your shoulder blades together and opening up your chest. Repeat 2 sets of 15 repetitions.
3. Place your hands in a doorway, step forward with one foot. Bend your front knee and lean into the doorway, stretching out your chest. Hold for 30 seconds, repeat with opposite leg forward.

 

Make sure your computer screen is directly in front of you, and that you are able to look straight at it, not down. Try to keep your trunk in a neutral posture, with a lumbar support at the base of your spine.

ONS licensed physical and hand therapists offer professional, individualized treatment, using state-of-the-art techniques to evaluate and treat orthopaedic and spinal conditions. Our therapists hold advanced degrees. They are trained in rehabilitation for sports injuries, musculoskeletal injuries, orthopaedic and spine surgeries as well as treatments for movement impairment and functional limitation.

Returning to Spring Sports- Take it Slow

If you have been less active over the winter months and now can’t wait to get back into your exercise routine, a word of caution– take it slow to avoid early season injuries. Don’t try to pick up where you left off last fall. Build up your work out gradually.

Christina Hennessy from Greenwich Time and The Advocate has written an article, Spring Shape up, that offers some good advice, some of which comes from ONS’ Gloria Cohen, MD and Laura Liebesman, PT.

Below is our own list of tips for safe return to sports activity

• Practice a regular strengthening and flexibility program, remembering to balance opposing muscle groups.

• Warm up before every workout or sports activity.

• Wear appropriate footgear and do not use worn-out running or tennis shoes that can negatively affect biomechanics.

• When returning to sports or a fitness program, start slowly and build up gradually.

• Maintain your body with proper nutrition and hydration for optimal performance.

• Vary your fitness routine. Repetitive use of the same muscles and joints may cause strain or injury.

• If you feel pain, stop exercising and have the pain evaluated.

• Listen to your body and know your limits.

Register Now for January 26 Free Ski Injury Prevention Seminar

The free ONS Ski Injury Prevention Seminar will take place on January 26 at 7 PM.  It’s not too late to get ready for the ski season. Don’t miss this opportunity to hear important tips for safe skiing, information about the most advanced treatments for common injuries such as a ruptured ACL, and a presentation on the latest ski and snowboard technology by Hickory and Tweed of Armonk.  Orthopedic and sports medicine specialists Steven Hindman, MD and Katherine Vadasdi, MD will discuss the causes of the most common skiing injuries and how many of them may be avoided. Physical Therapist Chalon Lefebvre, PT will discuss the importance of a pre-season conditioning and strengthening program.

Admission is free but registration is requested. Call 203-869-3470 or send email to clinicalresearch@onsmd.com to register.

The ski injury prevention seminar is offered by the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education. The goal of the ONS Foundation is to improve standards of excellence for the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders through clinical research, physician and patient education, and community outreach programs. For more information about the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education, call Ifeoma Inneh at (203) 869 3131. The ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education is an alliance with Greenwich Hospital. For further information, visit www.ons-foundation.org or call (203) 869-3131.

Team ONS Celebrates National Physical Therapy Month

Team ONS
Team ONS runs for Susannah

On Sunday, October 11th, to celebrate National Physical Therapy Month, “Team ONS” took part in Susannah’s Run, a 5-K run (or walk) at Tod’s Point in Old Greenwich, to support the Susannah Chase Memorial Scholarship Fund established in 1998. The annual event celebrates Susannah’s love of the outdoors and her dedication to running.  Proceeds from Susannah’s Run will go towards a scholarship given to a GHS senior every year in honor of Susannah Chase.

National Physical Therapy Month, sponsored by the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), is a nationwide observance held each October. This year’s theme, “Move Forward: Physical Therapy Brings Motion to Life” reflects the physical therapist brand, “Physical therapists help you restore and improve motion to achieve long-term quality of life.”

Seven members of the staff of ONS Physical Therapy put on their running shoes to participate in the event. ONS sponsored the team and made a donation to help the cause.