ONS Adds Joint Replacement Case Manager

Tori Kroll, RN, is known to many ONS physicians and staffers from her former position as the coordinator for joint and spine programs at Greenwich Hospital.  Tori worked in various departments at the hospital for 38 years, and it was there that she developed her love of orthopedics and helping orthopedic patients.

“This is a dream job for me,” she said of joining ONS.

In this newly created role, Tori provide joint replacement patients with a full continuum of personalized care from the time a surgery is scheduled through the initial months of recovery.  The position provides many advantages to patients, including a direct line for any questions or concerns.  In addition, Tori may visit patients’ homes to evaluate post-op safety and arrange for supportive equipment, if needed. She may also coordinate post surgical at-home care or a stay at a skilled-care facilities of preferred providers.

“It’s all about achieving the best outcomes,” said Tori. “By establishing a close relationship with patients, we can fully prepare them for every level of the procedure and after.”

Anterior Hip Replacement

Is Anterior Hip Replacement Right for You?anterior hip joint replacement

Anterior hip replacement offers many advantages over traditional hip replacement procedures; however, it is not for everyone and, as with any surgery, has its own risks.

Advantages of Anterior Hip Replacement

In traditional hip replacement procedures, surgeons replace the damaged hip cartilage and bone with a prosthesis through an incision in the back (posterior) or the side (lateral) of the hip. In both of these procedures, surrounding muscles need to be cut or detached from the bone to provide access to the joint and then repaired at the end of the procedure.  The front of the hip has fewer and smaller muscles, enabling surgeons to work between them.  Therefore, patients typically experience less post-surgical pain and don’t require as much pain medication.

Since anterior hip replacement surgery does not disrupt the surrounding muscles or soft tissues, the risk of hip dislocation, a major concern with hip joint replacement, is greatly reduced.  Patients can bend at the waist and sit with their legs crossed as soon as it is comfortable; traditional hip replacement patients must avoid those activities for 6 – 8 weeks or longer because of the risk of dislocation.

Patients who have undergone anterior hip replacement are often able to go home the day of the procedure because they tend to recover more quickly than with the other approaches. Patients are typically walking with crutches or a walker and are able to bend at the waist within a day, and are able to walk unassisted a week or more earlier than patients who’ve had one of the traditional procedures.

Limits and Risks of Anterior Hip Replacement

Any successful hip replacement surgery depends on many factors beyond surgical approach, including the surgeon’s training and skill, the patient’s overall health and fitness, and the patient’s level of commitment to post-surgical rehabilitation. In general, people who are obese or extremely muscular are not good candidates for anterior hip replacement because the excess soft tissue decreases the space in the front of the hip.

The anterior hip replacement procedure requires a high level of training and precision because surgeons are working with a restricted view of the hip joint.    With the anterior approach, the surgical area is near the lateral cutaneous femoral nerve, which extends from the front of the pelvis to provide sensation to the outer thigh. If the nerve is affected during surgery, the thigh could become numb and, in rare cases, (less than 1 %) develop a painful skin condition. Not every hip replacement surgeon has undergone the highly technical training to safely to perform the anterior procedure, so it is important investigate the qualifications of your surgeon.

Individuals considering hip replacement surgery should consult with a hip replacement specialist to understand which approach is best suited for his or her personal circumstances and lifestyle goals.

Watch a video demonstration of the procedure.

Schedule a consultation with with a hip joint replacement specialist or call for an appointment 203-869-1145.

 

Reviewed 2019

ONS In The Lead with New Hip Replacement Procedure

ONS hip and knee replacement specialist Dr. Jonathan Berliner was featured in the Daily Voice for his expertise in anterior hip replacement, a relatively new approach to the procedure.

In the online article, titled, ONS Remains at the Forefront of Hip Replacement Surgery, John Haffey writes:

“Faster recovery and less pain are just a few of the reasons why minimally invasive anterior hip replacement surgery has seen an increase in popularity in recent years. However, this intricate procedure requires a high degree of training and expertise, and not all joint replacement surgeons are qualified to perform the operation.

During more traditional approaches to hip surgery, surgeons cut and remove the damaged cartilage and bone, and replace it with a prosthesis through an incision in the back (posterior) or the side (lateral) of the hip, explained Dr. Jonathan Berliner, a joint replacement specialist at Orthopaedic & Neurosurgery Specialists who performs the minimally-invasive surgery. During these procedures, muscles need to be cut or detached to gain access to the surgical area. However, through the anterior approach surgeons can enter through the hip’s front and repair the joint through the natural gaps between muscles. This precision helps minimize injury to the soft tissue in the area.

“Since there is less disruption to the muscles and tendons, patients tend to recover hip function and gait mechanics more quickly and with less pain,” said Berliner. The risk of hip dislocation, a concern after total hip replacement surgeries, is decreased because the muscles and soft tissue structures that normally hold the hip joint in place remain intact. Patient hospital stays are also generally shorter with the anterior approach.

Surgeons have been using an anterior approach to other hip surgeries for some time, but anterior hip replacement has only recently gained increased attention, noted Berliner. It’s estimated that only 15 to 20 percent of hip replacement surgeries performed in the United States utilize this approach. Moreover, not all joint replacement surgeons have undergone the specialized training required to perform this technically challenging procedure, which offers a limited view of the operating site and leaves little room for error.”

The Daily Voice shares its content across Fairfield and Westchester counties.  You can read other ONS related stories that have appeared in the Daily Voice here.

Considering Joint Replacement?

If pain in your knee, hip or shoulder joint is interfering with your quality of life, it may be time to consider joint replacement.Joint replacement surgery

Join shoulder replacement surgeon Seth Miller, MD, and hip and knee replacement surgeon Frank Ennis, MD, to learn all about the advances in joint replacement procedures and what to expect from your first office visit through the recovery process.  Dr. Miller and Dr. Ennis will be joined by Greenwich Hospital staff who will outline the particulars of your hospital stay.  There will be time to have your questions answered at the conclusion of the program.

Joint Replacement Symposium

When:  Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Where: Greenwich Hospital Noble Auditorium

Time: 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Seating is limited.  Please register on line or by calling 203-863-4277.

Double Shoulder Replacement Restores Mobility

Shoulder replacement regains his active lifestyle just months following surgery.

Arthritis had taken its toll on Dave’s shoulders. He was in constant pain. Sleeping was difficult and it was nearly impossible for him to take part in activities that he loves.  Then, two friends with similar shoulder issuesD.Hapke in Kayak referred Dave to shoulder surgeon, Dr. Seth Miller at ONS.  “When I met him, I immediately knew he was the doctor I wanted to care for me. He was thorough, thoughtful and patient. He has a great bedside manner and took the time to completely answer all my questions,” he recalled. 

Dave had his first shoulder replacement in January, 2013; the second one was done a year later. In both instances, the therapists had him doing exercises the day after surgery, which he continued at home within the week. Through a physical therapy program over the next few months, Dave was able to build muscle mass to help support his new shoulders.

Just 16 weeks after surgery, Dave was back on the water kayaking pain free. These days, he goes to the gym 2- 3 times a week and kayaks quite a bit on ponds, lakes and streams. He can even carry his  kayak.

“I am so grateful to have my active life back, thanks to ONS!” he said.

Shoulder replacement surgery and reverse shoulder replacement surgery is not for everyone. In many cases, treatment such as icing, anti-inflammatory medication and physical therapy can help get shoulder pain from arthritis under control. However, if pain persists, as it did with Dave, it may be time to consider a surgical option, notes Dr. Miller.

With arthritis and some fractures and injuries, the cartilage of the shoulder gradually wears away, creating a situation where bone is rubbing against bone. The resulting inflammation is extremely painful and makes shoulder mobility progressively more difficult. This condition typically develops later in life and gets worse over time.

The shoulder replacement procedure replaces the damaged joint with a highly-polished metal ball attached to a stem and a plastic socket. As long as a patient has an intact functioning rotator cuff, it can be an extremely successful procedure.

However, there is a group of patients that not only have significant cartilage damage in their shoulder, but also have a torn rotator cuff that is beyond repair. The rotator cuff is a group of muscles that run from the shoulder blade to the upper arm and allows patient to elevate their arm. Twenty years ago, treatment options were limited. In 2004, the FDA approved a reverse shoulder replacement procedure that was being used successfully overseas.

The surgery takes about two hours and involves a small incision, usually about three to four inches in length. Patients can expect to stay in the hospital somewhere from one to three days. Patients will be released with their arm in a sling, and undergo exercises to reestablish range of motion with the joint.

Between four and eight weeks after surgery, patients should be able to raise their arms above their heads without pain. Three to four months after surgery, patients are gradually resuming the activities of daily living. Many patients remark after recovery that they feel like they’ve been given their life back.

ONS’ Dr. Seth Miller was one of the first in the metropolitan area to perform reverse shoulder replacement surgery. He will take part in a Joint Replacement Symposium at Greenwich Hospital with ONS colleagues and joint replacement surgeons Drs. Frank Ennis and Brian Kavanagh.

The event will be held on Wed. May 11 starting at 6 p.m.  To register, call 203-863-4277 or online.

An Arthritic Reality Check

Arthritis affects more than 52 million adults in the United States and is the most common cause of disability,” according to the CDC. The pain from arthritis can set the stage for a decline in physical activity and make it difficult to prevent chronic health problems. Unfortunately, some who suffer from this ailment stop their activity and become depressed from thoughts of the mobility they once had.

Solutions for Knee Pain ArticleJane E. Brody, author of the “Keep  Moving to Stay a Step Ahead of Arthritis” article in The New York Times recently attempted to relate to those suffering from arthritis by speaking of her own battle with having to put down the tennis racket after decades of enjoying the sport, and her story did not end there. Two years after that, she had joint replacement surgery, picked up an assortment of other activities that successfully replaced tennis as a main source of activity. Therefore, encouraging others to do the same and not succumb to the depression that can sometimes come in hand with arthritis.

The reality is that the majority of people dealing with arthritis do not fully understand what they are capable of. Less than 10% of participants with arthritic knees in a 10-year study met the national guidelines of doing two and a half hours of moderate physical activity a week. Yes, you read that correctly, a week! It gets better though. Participants did notice a significant improvement of function when the amount of activity per week was increased. Additional weight on the body creates unnecessary stress on the major joints as well, leaving a 10% decrease in weight able to make a noticeable difference. With this fact a recommendation of starter exercises were mentioned, including walking laps in a swimming pool and then increasing activity as the muscles gain strength.

For more insightful tips, come to Dr. Delos’ talk about “Solutions for Knee Pain in Active Patients with Arthritis” tonight! The program is free and open to the public! Registration Requested. Aside from the talk, please consult your physician if this article has hit home and/or your quality of life is not what it once was; ONS provides excellent service and care for those in need, proudly keeping up-to-date with developments in the field.

Joint Replacement Symposium at Greenwich Hospital

hip replacementOn Wednesday, April 22nd, at 6:00 p.m., orthopedic surgeon/ joint replacement specialists from ONS and Greenwich Hospital will present a joint replacement symposium in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital located at 5 Perryridge Road. Knee and hip specialists Frank Ennis, MD and Brian Kavanagh, MD; and shoulder specialist Seth Miller, MD will present information about the latest advances in joint replacement, including computer-assisted and minimal incision, muscle sparing techniques. Information about preparing for joint replacement, pain management and what to expect from the recovery process will be addressed by hospital anesthesiology, nursing and physical therapy department staff.

Many people suffer from severe pain caused by arthritis, a fracture or other conditions that make common activities such as walking, putting on shoes and socks or getting in and out of a car, extremely difficult. Today, over 900,000 hip and knee replacement surgeries are performed each year in the United States. An additional 53,000 shoulder replacements are performed. Deciding if and when it’s time to consider joint replacement surgery are important decisions.  This educational symposium is designed to provide anyone who is considering joint replacement with pertinent information to assist them in making the right decision for them.

Frank Ennis, MD specializes in hip and knee replacement and is fellowship trained in adult reconstructive surgery. Dr. Ennis is among the first orthopedic surgeons in the New York area to perform computer-assisted joint replacement. He completed undergraduate studies at Yale University and post-baccalaureate pre-medical studies at Harvard University. He graduated from Duke University School of Medicine and completed a residency at Yale University Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. He received his fellowship training at New England Baptist Hospital in Boston.

Dr. Kavanagh
Dr. Kavanagh

Brian Kavanagh, MD has performed over 6500 joint replacement surgeries in the past 25 years. He graduated Princeton University and earned a medical degree at University of Connecticut School of Medicine. He did his internship and residency at the Mayo Clinic, Mayo Graduate School of Medicine in Rochester, Minnesota, and served on the faculty at the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine for seven years. Dr. Kavanagh was on the teaching staff at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven for five years. Dr. Kavanagh was also an instructor in the hip and knee total joint fellowship program.

Seth Miller, MD is a graduate of Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. After his residency at New York Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, he completed a research fellowship at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York and a shoulder surgery fellowship at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. He served as an orthopaedic consultant to the New York Mets for more than eight years.  He is the current President of ONS.

All three surgeons are on staff at Greenwich Hospital, a recipient of The Joint Commission’s “Gold Seal of Approval™” for total hip and knee replacement surgery and spinal fusion. The certification for hip and knee replacement procedures recognizes the hospital’s commitment to maintain clinical excellence and patient satisfaction, while continuously working to improve patient care.  Greenwich Hospital’s total joint replacement program offers a level of continuity that sets it apart from other facilities. A clinical resource nurse helps patients every step of the way – before, during and after surgery and throughout rehabilitation and recovery. Patients receive the practical information, emotional support and follow-up care they need to guide them through the entire process.

You will have the opportunity to ask questions at the conclusion of the talk.  The program is free and open to the public. Registration Requested. Call (203) 863-4277 or register online at www.greenhosp.org.

Shoulder Pain? (Part II)

Shoulder_Pain_blogRemember last week’s post? Dr. Kowalsky ended the last installment with listing a multiple options one could take to repair a rotator cuff tear due to the fact that it is very unlikely for the condition to heal on its own. The following is a more in depth description of what makes up this part of the body and what to do after the symptoms of arthritis of the shoulder appear.

The glenohumeral joint of the shoulder includes the humeral head, or ball, and the glenoid, or shallow socket.  Both joint surfaces are coated with articular cartilage, the pearly-white, smooth surface that allows near friction-free, painless movement of one surface on another.  Typical wear-and-tear osteoarthritis occurs due to the degeneration of the joint surface.  As the articular cartilage erodes, the underlying bone can become exposed, change in shape, and create symptoms.  Patients typically present with pain deep within the joint.  The pain can be associated with mechanical symptoms, such as catching, clicking, or grinding, as well as loss of motion.  For some patients, typically those with mild or moderate arthritis, there is a role for conservative management.

However, the most reliable means for pain relief, improved motion and function for patients with moderate or severe arthritis is shoulder replacement.  This procedure is performed by removing and replacing the arthritic ball with a metal implant, and by resurfacing the socket with a plastic implant, restoring low-friction, pain-free motion. Implant design and surgical technique for the treatment of both rotator cuff tears and shoulder arthritis continue to evolve.   These innovations empower shoulder and elbow surgeons to individualize the treatment plan to a specific patient and problem.

Tonight, March 12 at 6:30 pm at Greenwich Hospital,  Dr. Kowalsky will give a health talk on “Common Causes and Solutions to Chronic Shoulder Pain” will discuss the causes, symptoms, and treatment of rotator cuff tears and shoulder arthritis.  The event will highlight important recent advances in the management of these conditions that have been associated with improved long-term outcomes.

The program is free and open to the public.
Registration Requested. Call (203) 863-4277, or register online at www.greenhosp.org.

Shoulder Pain? (Part I)

Marc Kowalsky MD
Marc Kowalsky, MD.

ONS welcomes Dr. Kowalsky,  a board-certified orthopedic surgeon with expertise in rehab-focused, as well as operative treatments for upper and lower extremity sports injury, and complex shoulder and elbow conditions including degenerative disease, trauma, and revision surgery. He has also authored original research manuscripts, review articles, textbook chapters focusing on AC joint reconstruction, rotator cuff repair, and shoulder replacement, and now he is adding to the educational articles ONS provides.

Shoulder pain is the second most common musculoskeletal complaint to a primary care physician, behind only back pain. Twenty percent of the population will suffer from shoulder pain during their lifetime.  A variety of conditions can contribute to shoulder pain, ranging from rotator cuff problems to arthritis of the shoulder joint.

The rotator cuff tendon consists of the tendons of the four muscles that originate on the shoulder blade and insert on the humerus adjacent to the ball of the shoulder joint.  These muscles participate in rotation and elevation of the arm.  A bursa, or fluid-filled sac, lies on top of the rotator cuff tendon, and helps to protect or shield the tendon from the adjacent structures of the shoulder as the tendon glides.

Although most people who present to their physician with a rotator cuff problem likely have simple tendonitis, or bursitis, some may in fact have a rotator cuff tear.  At least twenty-five percent of people over the age of sixty may have a tear in the rotator cuff tendon.  Most of these tears are chronic and degenerative in nature, without any traumatic cause.  These patients experience shoulder pain with motion away from the body and overhead, typically along the side of the shoulder and arm.  They may also experience night pain that awakens them from sleep.

Some patients may also notice weakness, depending on the size of the tear.  A rotator cuff tear, once present, is unlikely to heal on its own, and may enlarge over time.  Nevertheless, many patients with a tear can be successfully treated with conservative means, including physical therapy, oral anti-inflammatory medication, and perhaps an injection of corticosteroid.  For those patients who do continue to experience pain due to a rotator cuff tear, operative repair is an option.  This procedure is typically performed arthroscopically, and consists of anchoring of the torn tendon to its attachment site with a series of small screws, or anchors.  Ultimately this procedure is effective in improving a patient’s pain and overall function. (…to be continued)

If this topic interests you keep an eye out for the next installment and attend Dr. Kowalsky’s upcoming seminar on March 12th at Greenwich Hospital. The program is free and open to the public.
Registration Requested. Call (203) 863-4277, or register online at www.greenhosp.org.

Suffer from Bunion Pain? Dr. Clain Offers Solutions

Michael Clain, MD
Michael Clain, MD

Bunions are a common deformity encountered in the foot where the big toe is out of alignment. This creates pain in that toe and often in the lesser toes as well. The deformity makes it difficult to find shoes that fit comfortably.  Ill-fitting shoes can contribute to the situation but the underlying deformity is genetic. This is why most patients can recall a parent or grandparent that had the problem.

In consultation, I often tell patients that the options are to accommodate the foot with wider shoes, gentle arch supports and sometimes padding or I encourage them to consider surgery.  The decision to proceed with surgery should be based on the overall level of discomfort and deformity.  This will differ from patient to patient.  It is rare that the patient that must have bunion surgery.  Most people will choose surgery due to the accumulation of annoyances, discomfort, pain and deformity in other toes.

Actual X-ray of patient of Dr. Clain before bunion surgery
X-ray of patient of Dr. Clain before bunion surgery
Same Patient. Post-Bunionechotmy
Same Patient. Post-Bunionechotmy

It is very important, from my point of view, to communicate realistic expectations for the procedure and the ultimate result. I try hard to be very specific about the time involved in recovery and give every patient a written “expected surgical recovery.” It is obviously difficult to remember everything when you as the patient are given a great deal of information so it’s helpful to have a summary to refer to.

Not all bunions are the same. Routinely, I perform about six different surgical procedures.  The goal is to do the most appropriate operation for your particular foot and circumstance.  With careful communication and a well thought-out plan it is highly likely that we should be able to get a great result for almost any foot.”

For more information about Dr. Clain, click here.

If you suffer from bunions and would like to attend a free seminar on foot pain Dr. Peden of ONS and Greenwich Hospital will present Solutions for Foot & Ankle Pain: Beyond Foot Massage is an orthopedic surgeon specializing in foot and ankle surgery. He will present treatments and surgical techniques for bunions and other foot deformities. Learn more and register online here.

Are You Considering Joint Replacement Surgery?

Orthopedic surgeons Frank Ennis, MD, Brian Kavanagh, MD, Seth Miller, MD, along with Greenwich Hospital’s anesthesiology, nursing and physical therapy staff will present an informative and comprehensive seminar about joint replacement surgery on Wednesday, April 2nd from 6-8pm. This free seminar will be presented in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital. The three joint replacement specialists will present comprehensive information about the latest advances in joint replacement such as computer-assisted surgery, minimally invasive and muscle sparing techniques. Also, information on how to prepare for joint replacement surgery, post-operative pain management and what to expect from the recovery process. The seminar is open to the public. Registration is required. To register, call (203) 863-4277 or register online at www.greenhops.org.

Download: Joint Replacement Surgery PDF

Dr. Ennis Leading joint replacement expert Frank Ennis, MD is a board-certified orthopedic surgeon and fellowship trained in adult reconstructive surgery. He is a specialist in hip and knee replacement is among the first orthopedic surgeons in the New York area to perform computer-assisted joint replacement. He completed his undergraduate studies at Yale University and post-baccalaureate pre-medical studies at Harvard University. Dr. Ennis graduated from Duke University School of Medicine and completed a residency at Yale University Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. He received fellowship training in adult reconstructive surgery at New England Baptist Hospital in Boston.

Dr. Brian Kavanagh Brian Kavanagh, MD has performed over 6000 joint replacement surgeries in the past 25 years and was one of the first surgeons in the New York area to perform minimal incision joint replacement. He is a board certified orthopedic surgeon who graduated from Princeton University and earned a medical degree at University of Connecticut School of Medicine. Dr. Kavanagh’s internship and residency was at the Mayo Clinic, Mayo Graduate School of Medicine in Rochester, Minnesota, where he also served on the faculty for seven years. He was on the teaching staff at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven for five years, was a consultant to the Department of Orthopedics at the Mayo Clinic, where he specialized in hip and knee reconstruction, and also an instructor for the hip and knee total joint fellowship program.

Dr. Miller  Seth Miller, MD is a board-certified orthopedic surgeon specializing in arthroscopic shoulder surgery and shoulder replacement at ONS. He is a staff orthopedic physician at Greenwich Hospital and is Assistant Attending Physician in Orthopedic Surgery at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Dr. Miller served as orthopedic consultant to the New York Mets for nine years, attending spring training and regular Major League season games where he oversaw the physical condition of players. Dr. Miller has performed over 1000 total shoulder and reverse shoulder replacements, the most significant breakthrough in shoulder replacement surgery in the last 30 years.

To learn more about Joint Replacement Surgery, click here.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit https://onsmd.com/ or call 203.869.1145.

Looks like more snow is in the forecast, we have some skiing tips for you!

skierThe knee is the most vulnerable body part for any athlete, including skiers. Downhill skiing produces large amounts of torque on the knee, challenging the integrity of ligaments and tendons. Whether from a fall or overuse, the most common injuries in skiers are tears to the MCL (Medial Collateral Ligament) or ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament), two important structures that give our knee stability.  When a skier is thrown off balance, his skis will sometimes shoot out in front of him, creating extra torque on the knees and damaging our stabilizing structures.

Both novice and experienced skiers are at risk of hurting their knees. We frequently see novice skiers hurt themselves when they do not know how to turn, stop or fall properly. Taking lessons and working with an instructor goes a long way in preventing knee injuries for beginner skiers. Experienced skiers frequently take risks and assume that they can manage faster speeds on any slope.  Many injuries, whether you are a beginner or an experienced skier, are related to weather conditions. It is important to realize that as visibility and surface conditions deteriorate, the slope or trail level goes up. In poor visibility or icy conditions, a beginner trail becomes an intermediate trail, and an intermediate slope becomes advanced slope. Keep injury prevention in mind, if the conditions are difficult, ski down a level.

A second reason injuries occur is fatigue. Most skiers’ bodies are not accustomed to exercising 6-8 straight hours. In addition, many skiers push their bodies to take advantage of the whole day, even when they start to feel tired and stiff.  For this reason, injuries tend to happen at the end of the day.

Having the knowledge of what places skiers at a higher risk for knee injuries, we are passing on recommendations about how to stay safe on the slopes.  Both beginners and experienced skiers can benefit from these tips!

  1. Start a conditioning program a few months before your first ski trip. Leg strengthening, flexibility and balance are important aspects of an adequate ski conditioning program.
  2. Ski with good technique. Maintain your balance and control, keep your hips above your knees, keep your arms forward, and maintain a safe speed.
  3. Learn how to fall correctly: keep your legs together, keep your chin to your chest and your arms up and forward.
  4. Pay attention to weather conditions and remember to ski down a level if conditions deteriorate.
  5. Listen to your body. If you start to feel pain or stiffness upon exiting the lift chair, then you should probably make that run your last. Head to the lodge and enjoy a warm drink by the fire.

Good luck and stay warm!

If you become injured, while skiing, remember, ONS sports medicine physicians are trained at the top universities and hospitals in the country and have expertise in the latest treatments for sports-related injuries in high-performance and recreational athletes.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit https://onsmd.com/ or call 203.869.1145.

 

Calendar of Health Information Programs by ONS Physicians at Greenwich Hospital

PROGRAMS CALENDAR 2014

This year the physicians at ONS will present health information seminars for the public on a variety of topics ranging from joint replacement to common soccer injuries, injury prevention and treatments. Sessions to take place in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich, and followed by a question and answer period where the public may pose questions to the presenters. To register for upcoming ONS programs at Greenwich Hospital, please call (203) 863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register on-line at http://www.greenhosp.org/.

2 APRIL 2014 – Joint Symposium, Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich <read more>

Past Topics

Knee Pain Seminar

Chichi_knee anatomy
For millions of Americans, knee pain is a daily reality. Many people try to ignore pain caused by arthritis in the knee joint for as long as possible in hopes that it will go away. However, arthritis is a progressive disease and for many, will even become debilitating. On December 3, 2013, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Demetris Delos presented a “Knee Pain Seminar” addressing treatment options for knee pain due to early-stage arthritis. He discussed non-operative and operative solutions from therapeutic injections, arthroscopic procedures to osteotomy and partial knee replacement. The seminar was free and open to the public.

Speaker: Orthopedic Surgeon Demetris Delos, MD

ONS is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice serving patients throughout Fairfield and Westchester Counties and the New York Metropolitan area. ONS physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com, or call (203) 869-1145.

Osteoporosis: Prevention, Treatment and Managementgraphic

Osteoporosis, a disease that weakens the bones and leads to fractures, affects 28 million Americans and contributes to an estimated 1.5 million bone fractures every year. Half of all women older than 65 and one in five men is affected by osteoporosis. On Wednesday, October 23, 2013 at 6:30 pm, physicians with ONS and Greenwich Hospital hosted a seminar on Osteoporosis: Prevention, Treatment and Management. The public was invited to hear from medical experts what measures may be taken to prevent bone loss or minimize its effects. Presenters included Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Endocrinologist Ranee Lleva, MD, and Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter. The program took place in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road and was free of charge. To register for ONS programs at Greenwich Hospital, please call (203) 863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register on-line at www.greenhosp.org. For more information on topics related to orthopedics, visit www.onsmd.com

Speakers: Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Endocrinologist Ranee Lleva, MD, and Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter. Wednesday, October 23, 6:30-8 pm

Cartilage Transplantation Offers New Hope for Damaged Knees

Delos Office Vertical
Dr. Demetris Delos

Cartilage transplantation offers exciting new treatment options for adults under the age of 50 who have had their knee damaged through acute or chronic trauma to the knee. The surgeon uses small cylindrical plugs of good cartilage and inserts them into the damaged areas. This procedure has been shown to be highly effective in patients who have sustained a specific injury to the knee cartilage or joint lining, and who have not yet developed arthritis. Many competitive athletes who have undergone the treatment have returned to their full performance level after surgery.

Speaker: Orthopaedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist Demetris Delos, MD

Women’s Sports Medicine Center forum at Greenwich Hospital

WSMC group photo cu

Who would know better how to treat active women of all ages and levels of sports activity than the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center physician and physical therapy team?

In addition to being experts in their fields as orthopedic surgeons and sports medicine specialists, the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center team is comprised of current and former athletes and fitness enthusiasts who know first-hand what it takes to train and excel in a sport. (In fact, Dr. Katie Vadasdi, an orthopedic surgeon, is an accomplished tri-athlete who has completed two Ironman competitions, is an alpine climber and has ascended Mount Kilimanjaro, Mount Rainier and the Grand Teton.)

Come hear the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center panel discussion hosted by Greenwich Hospital:

“Women Treating Women”

The event, which took place in the Noble Conference Room at Greenwich Hospital, featured the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine experts in a panel discussion regarding the latest diagnostic and medical management techniques for injuries and conditions common in female athletes.

The public was invited to bring their sports injury or fitness-related questions and get answers from a team of physicians who have provided medical support to five Olympic Games, international biking and fencing championships, and medical coverage for the Columbia University sports teams and Greenwich High School sports.

Women’s Sports Medicine Panel:

Katie Vadasdi, MD, Orthopedic Surgeon, Sports Medicine Specialist Fellowship Training: Columbia University Medical Center

Gloria Cohen, MD, Primary Care Sports Medicine, Olympic Team Physician Post Graduate Sports Medicine, University of British Columbia

Tamar Kessel, MD, Physiatrist, Interventional Sports and Spine Fellowship Training: Hospital for Special Surgery

Laura Liebesman, PT, Director of ONS Physical Therapy Specialties- Golf mechanics, Orthopedics and Spine PT Certification – University of Pennsylvania

 

Cartilage Transplantation Offers New Hope for Damaged Knees

Delos Office Vertical
Dr. Demetris Delos

Speaker: Orthopaedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist Demetris Delos, MD

Tuesday, October 29th, 6:30 pm, Noble Conference Room Center at Greenwich Hospital

Cartilage transplantation offers exciting new treatment options for adults under the age of 50 who have had their knee damaged through acute or chronic trauma to the knee. The surgeon uses small cylindrical plugs of good cartilage and inserts them into the damaged areas. This procedure has been shown to be highly effective in patients who have sustained a specific injury to the knee cartilage or joint lining, and who have not yet developed arthritis. Many competitive athletes who have undergone the treatment have returned to their full performance level after surgery.

To register To register for the ONS programs at Greenwich Hospital, please call (203)
863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register on-line at www.greenhosp.org.

 

 

Greenwich Hospital New Mini-Med Seminar series begins with talk on Joint Disease by Paul Sethi, MD

Paul Sethi, MD
Orthopaedic surgeon Paul Sethi, MD

On Wednesday, March 13 at 6:30-7:30 p.m., Greenwich Hospital will begin a new Mini-Med Seminar series. The first program, “Let’s talk about Joints: Degenerative Joint Disease (DJD); Causes, Symptoms and Treatments,” will be presented by ONS orthopaedic Surgeon Dr. Paul Sethi in Hospital’s Noble Conference Center at 5 Perryridge Road. Attendance is free. To register, call 203-863-4277 or 888-305-9253, or register online.

Also known as osteoarthritis, DJD affects over 30 percent of the US population over age 65 and is characterized by joint pain and stiffness and a progressive loss of mobility. DJD occurs when the cartilage that cushions the joint breaks down and begins to wear away. By 2030, a projected 67 million people will have been diagnosed with DJD. Understanding the latest research on the causes of the disease and the surgical and non-surgical treatment options will be the focus of this seminar. Dr. Paul Sethi, who is also President of the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education, will lead this educational and interactive program.

Greenwich Hospital Mini-Med seminars offers tuition-free monthly programs that focus on basic anatomy and physiology, common disease conditions, and possible cures and treatment options. The series aims to introduce the public to the science of human health and the groundbreaking changes taking place in the field of medicine today. The audience will gain a greater awareness of significant health issues, and about the role of medical research in advancing healthcare. The seminars are presented by Greenwich Hospital staff physicians and are designed to be causal and highly informative. No science or medical background required! Ample time will be given to a question and answer period. Whether you’re a student, teacher, caregiver, healthcare provider, or someone with an interest in research and medicine, you will gain a better understanding of basic terms and medical concepts from the seminars.