ONS Names Sally Frank Chief Operating Officer

Orthopaedic & Neurosurgery Specialists (ONS) announced today the appointment of Sally Frank to the new position of Chief Operating Officer.  Frank has been an integral part of the practice IMG_1909asince 2004, starting first as a Marketing and Communications Consultant. She was hired as Director of Marketing in 2009, and two years later became Director of Operations. In 2013, she was promoted to Executive Director.

During Frank’s tenure, she has overseen the development of the ONS brand as representing excellence in orthopedic and neurosurgical care in Fairfield and Westchester counties and beyond. Operationally, she has managed the rapid expansion of the practice to accommodate additional specialists and the growing demand for physical therapy services at 6 Greenwich Office Park in Greenwich.  Last year, Frank directed the opening of a second ONS location, a state-of-the-art 14,000 square foot office and physical therapy center at 5 High Ridge Park in Stamford. Currently, Frank is preparing for the 2017 opening of a third, similar facility in Westchester and further expansion at the new Stamford office.

“Sally has deftly implemented communications strategies and operational structures that have allowed ONS to manage significant growth while keeping the focus squarely on high quality patient care,” said ONS president, Seth Miller, MD.  As COO, Frank will build on strategic initiatives to keep ONS at the forefront of an increasingly competitive market, he said.

Presently, ONS has more than 150 employees and 23 physicians, MRI and digital X-ray suites, and two physical therapy departments with 15 physical therapists. One driving force behind ONS’s success is the caliber of its physicians, who are handpicked by the ONS partners from the most respected medical institutions in the country. The practice has become known and admired across the region not only because of its exceptional orthopedic and neurosurgical care, but for its emphasis on the patient experience. ONS physicians work as a team within specialties to deliver the best possible outcomes for patients.  The physicians are fellowship-trained and sub-specialized and take a conservative approach to treatment whenever possible.  For that reason, only 10 percent of ONS patients require surgery. ###

Summer is a Good Time to Treat Bunions

Summer is a good time to treat bunions, according to foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Sean Peden.

As sandals return to the wardrobe this summer, the disfiguring prominences known as bunions can present cosmetic and physical problems for those sufSemi circle of colorful flip flops on old weathered blue painted beach decking. Space for copy.fering from the foot condition. Bunions can be extremely painful, making it difficult to find shoes that don’t put pressure on the area or cause more discomfort.

While there’s no explanation why some people develop bunions and others do not, bunions can arise at any time from adolescence through retirement. The condition does affect women more than men though, and studies have shown that wearing high heeled shoes tends to exacerbate the problem.

“Treatment for bunions varies depending on the severity,” said Dr. Sean Peden, an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in foot and ankle surgery and orthopedic trauma at ONS. “Ice, anti-inflammatories and orthotics can help alleviate pain. However, if a bunion is not addressed early, the pain can become disabling and require surgery to realign the bones, ligaments and tendons to bring the big toe back to its correct position.”

In the past, bunion surgery required a lengthy recovery and a cumbersome foot cast. Now, new techniques, materials, and an emphasis on maintaining mobility through the healing process has made bunion surgery much less of an ordeal. Casts are rarely applied, patients normally use crutches for one to three weeks and complete recovery takes two to four months.

“Having bunion surgery in the summer has many advantages over the winter months,” said Dr. Peden. “Navigating ice and snow while recovering can be hazardous, and the recovery shoe, which is essentially an open-toe sandal, is much easier to deal with in the warmer months. After that, almost any open sandal would be more comfortable that putting your healing foot in a shoe.”

Despite the medical advances and reduced recovery time, a bunionectomy is not a procedure to undergo on a whim, and cosmetics alone are not a good reason to have the surgery. People with bunions that impact the quality of their daily lives should consult with a specialist to learn which treatment option is most appropriate.

ONS is Proud Sponsor of KIC-IT Triathlon

ONS is proud to sponsor the Kids in Crisis KIC-IT Triathlon sporting event for the third year.

KIC-IT is a vital fundraiser  for Kids in Crisis, Connecticut’s only free, round-the-clock crisis counseling center and temporary emergency shelter for children of all ages and spintowinfamilies dealing with abuse, neglect, homelessness, mental health issues or extreme family conflict. More than 800 athletes from throughout the Tri-state area are expected to participate in this popular two-day event. ONS is proud to support our community’s children in need and the important work of Kids in Crisis.

The Kids Triathlon takes place on Saturday, June 11 at Cove Beach in Stamford. Adults will compete on Sunday, June 12, in a variety of contests including the ninth annual Navigators Stamford KIC IT Olympic Triathlon, third annual Navigators Stamford KIC IT Sprint Triathlon and second annual Navigators Stamford KIC IT 5k and 10k races. These  USAT-sanctioned races lead athletes over courses along the Long Island Sound and throughout the city of Stamford.

Visit our booth during the Family Festival on Sunday from 9 am – 12 noon, where you can Spin to Win and test your knowledge of the body’s musculoskeletal system, injuries and treatments!

Double Shoulder Replacement Restores Mobility

Shoulder replacement regains his active lifestyle just months following surgery.

Arthritis had taken its toll on Dave’s shoulders. He was in constant pain. Sleeping was difficult and it was nearly impossible for him to take part in activities that he loves.  Then, two friends with similar shoulder issuesD.Hapke in Kayak referred Dave to shoulder surgeon, Dr. Seth Miller at ONS.  “When I met him, I immediately knew he was the doctor I wanted to care for me. He was thorough, thoughtful and patient. He has a great bedside manner and took the time to completely answer all my questions,” he recalled. 

Dave had his first shoulder replacement in January, 2013; the second one was done a year later. In both instances, the therapists had him doing exercises the day after surgery, which he continued at home within the week. Through a physical therapy program over the next few months, Dave was able to build muscle mass to help support his new shoulders.

Just 16 weeks after surgery, Dave was back on the water kayaking pain free. These days, he goes to the gym 2- 3 times a week and kayaks quite a bit on ponds, lakes and streams. He can even carry his  kayak.

“I am so grateful to have my active life back, thanks to ONS!” he said.

Shoulder replacement surgery and reverse shoulder replacement surgery is not for everyone. In many cases, treatment such as icing, anti-inflammatory medication and physical therapy can help get shoulder pain from arthritis under control. However, if pain persists, as it did with Dave, it may be time to consider a surgical option, notes Dr. Miller.

With arthritis and some fractures and injuries, the cartilage of the shoulder gradually wears away, creating a situation where bone is rubbing against bone. The resulting inflammation is extremely painful and makes shoulder mobility progressively more difficult. This condition typically develops later in life and gets worse over time.

The shoulder replacement procedure replaces the damaged joint with a highly-polished metal ball attached to a stem and a plastic socket. As long as a patient has an intact functioning rotator cuff, it can be an extremely successful procedure.

However, there is a group of patients that not only have significant cartilage damage in their shoulder, but also have a torn rotator cuff that is beyond repair. The rotator cuff is a group of muscles that run from the shoulder blade to the upper arm and allows patient to elevate their arm. Twenty years ago, treatment options were limited. In 2004, the FDA approved a reverse shoulder replacement procedure that was being used successfully overseas.

The surgery takes about two hours and involves a small incision, usually about three to four inches in length. Patients can expect to stay in the hospital somewhere from one to three days. Patients will be released with their arm in a sling, and undergo exercises to reestablish range of motion with the joint.

Between four and eight weeks after surgery, patients should be able to raise their arms above their heads without pain. Three to four months after surgery, patients are gradually resuming the activities of daily living. Many patients remark after recovery that they feel like they’ve been given their life back.

ONS’ Dr. Seth Miller was one of the first in the metropolitan area to perform reverse shoulder replacement surgery. He will take part in a Joint Replacement Symposium at Greenwich Hospital with ONS colleagues and joint replacement surgeons Drs. Frank Ennis and Brian Kavanagh.

The event will be held on Wed. May 11 starting at 6 p.m.  To register, call 203-863-4277 or online.

ONS to Sponsor BCA 5-K Run/Walk for Hope

The Women’s Sports Medicine Center at ONS is proud to support the Breast Cancer Alliance Run/Walk for Hope 5K.

It’s not too late to register and join Dr. Katie B. Vadasdi, sports medicine specialist and director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Center at ONWSMC BCA 5k t-shirtS, ONS Stamford Physicial Therapy Manager, Alicia Hirscht, DPT, SCS, CSCS, and others from Team ONS for a pre-run warm up and stretch before we hit the road!

When: Sunday, May 1, 2016

What: Breast Cancer Alliance Run/Walk for Hope 5K

Where:  Beginning and ending at Richards, 359 Greenwich Avenue, Greenwich

9:10 ONS Warm up

9:30  5K begins

10:45 One-mile kick off

The Women’s Sports Medicine Center at ONS is proud to support the Breast Cancer Alliance in its efforts to help eradicate breast cancer. Most of us know someone, or know of someone who has been faced with this disease. Last year, an estimated 1,700,00 American women were diagnosed with breast cancer, and nearly 600,000 American women died from it.

ONS MDs to Discuss Chronic Pain

Demetris Delos, MD and Christopher Sahler, MD of ONS to discuss effective treatments for Chronic Pain.

Maintaining quality of life while living with chronic pain is no easy feat. Two orthopedic specialists from ONS will discuss effective new treatments to help people with relentless pain return to the WavenyPain Flyer (2)activities they enjoy.  Join Demetris Delos, MD, an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in sports medicine an comprehensive knee and shoulder, and interventional pain management physiatrist, Christopher Sahler, MD for this informative talk on Wednesday, May 11 at The Inn at Waveny, 73 Oenoke Ridge in New Canaan.  Doors open at 4:00 pm for refreshments. Presentation begins at 4:30. RSVP at 203-594-5310 or mntiri@waveny.org.

 

ONS Surgeon Named Doctor of Distinction

Paul Sethi, MD, was named one of Fairfield County’s Doctors of Distinction by Westfair Communications.

Dr. Sethi, a sports medicine specialist and orthopedic surgeon at ONS, will be presented with the Cutting Edge Award  at the annual Fairfield County Doctors of Distinction Awards ceremony on Tuesday, May 3.  Dr. Sethi has received this recognition from Westfair Communications for his ongoing research into improving orthopedic surgical procedures  and help in creating international orthopedic surgical standards.  Doctors of Distinction

As President of the  ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education, Dr. Sethi’s research has recently included the establishment of  better methods for surgical skin preparation (cleaning) to lower the risk of surgical infection; development of a new technique to repair chronic or weakened biceps tendons; and the evaluation of surgical needles in tendon surgery to establish international guidelines on needle use. Additionally, Dr. Sethi has recently contributed a textbook chapter on shoulder fractures, and two chapters on treating elbow injuries in throwing athletes.

Learn more about Dr. Sethi’s outstanding career here.

 

ONS Physicians Open State-of-the-Art Ambulatory Surgery Center

Stamford ASC is a new ultra-modern ambulatory surgery center designed specifically for orthopedic surgery and neurosurgery. Clain ASC_edited-1

The Stamford ASC has recently received Connecticut State Department of Health approval for license and is now open for physicians to treat patients. Stamford ASC specializes in musculoskeletal surgeries and interventional pain management. The center includes two surgical suites built specifically for orthopedic and neurosurgical procedures, equipped with the latest arthroscopic and computer-assisted technology. The facility also has a procedure room for interventional pain management, a comfortable waiting room, and pre-operative and post-operative areas designed for utmost safety, comfort and efficiency. The technologically advanced surgery center offers patients access to the same arthroscopic and open surgery options found in a hospital setting but in a smaller, more comfortable environment.
Entrance 2 (2)

The warm surroundings of the center and emphasis on caring, individualized attention minimizes the stress often associated with surgery. Patients are released within hours of their procedure so they may complete their recovery in the comfort of home. Covered parking and a ground level entrance help make the patient experience as easy and convenient as possible.
“The Stamford ASC is the result of several years of research and planning, which began when ONS partners with a shared mission set out to build an industry-leading surgical care facility,” said Mark Camel, M.D., one of the Stamford ASC partners.

Formed by 14 experienced and respected orthopedic surgeons and neurosurgeons affiliated with Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists (ONS) in Greenwich and Stamford CT, the Stamford ASC reflects the standard of excellence that patients have come to expect from surgeons at ONS. “In the current healthcare environment, patients are looking for a more personalized surgery experience that is first and foremost, safe and efficient,” said Dr. James Cunningham, Medical Director of Stamford ASC. “This center will provide service that meets, if not exceeds, the most stringent Government safety requirements and infection controls.” The center was surveyed and approved by the Connecticut State Department of Health earlier this month.

“High quality outpatient facilities such as Stamford ASC best position physicians for healthcare industry challenges by combining cost efficiency with cutting edge technology and a new kind of patient experience,” said Dr. Cunningham. “I fully expect that the Stamford ASC will set the standard for efficient, cost-effective and patient-focused care in the region.”

Read the local press coverage in Greenwich Time and on the Daily Voice

Regenerative Medicine and Chronic Pain

Is regenerative medicine the answer to your chronic pain?

In the past, most cases of damaged tissue within the body were considered irreversible, but developments in regenerative medicine hold the potential to change all that, writes Christopher Sahler, PRPMD, an interventional pain management specialist at ONS, in this week’s edition of the Greenwich Sentinel.  Although research into harnessing the body’s own healing process using amniotic fluids, blood, tissues, growth factors and stem cells is ongoing, certain biomedical therapies are in use today to help ordinary people suffering from orthopedic conditions and chronic pain.  The most common treatment, using platelet rich plasma collected from a patient’s own blood, is administered in a physician’s office using ultrasound guided injections directly into the diseased or damaged tissue to restart and increase the healing process.  Read the full article in the April 1 edition of Greenwich Sentinel.

Female Athletes and ACL Injuries

Did you know that female athletes are from two to ten times more likely to suffer an ACL injury than their male counterparts?  

Woman playing tennis at the professional tournamentDifferences in pelvis width, the size of the ACL and the intercondylar notch (where the ACL crosses the knee joint), are all thought to play a role. What’s more, the upper part of a female’s shin bone at the joint is much shorter and more rounded than a male’s, which creates a greater laxity in the joint. Women also tend to have an inward angle to their knees, otherwise known as knocked knees, which places more stress across the outer knee joint and ligaments, particularly when it comes to sudden or extreme movements, such as an abrupt change in direction or pivot. Women also move differently than men. For instance, they tend to land from a jump with their knees in a somewhat straight position, pulling on the quadriceps rather than the hamstrings. Because of this, the force of the impact is transferred to the knee, creating a high risk for an ACL rupture. Men, on the other hand, are better able to absorb the impact because they tend to land with bent knees.

For these reasons, it is crucial for female athletes of all ages to modify their natural biomechanics through neuromuscular training programs that can teach them better ways to move their bodies and protect their knees, said orthopedic surgeon Katie Vadasdi, MD, who heads the Women’s Sports Medicine Center at ONS. “Through neuromuscular training programs, we can help female athletes significantly reduce the risk of ACL ruptures by developing balance between the quadriceps and hamstrings and improving the landing biomechanics with more bent knees and hips to avoid a knock-kneed position on impact.”

Preventing ACL injuries has both near and long term benefits so the sooner you get started with this kind of a conditioning program the better. Studies indicate that there is a tenfold increase in the incidence of osteoarthritis in the knees of women who suffered an ACL injury at some point in their lives. Moreover, injuries that were incurred during youth seem to result in the onset of osteoarthritic symptoms at a much earlier age in adulthood.

Learn more about ACL injuries here.

Fall Prevention

Did you know that most traumatic head injuries are the result of falling? ONS surgeon and trauma specialist Steven Hindman, MD, will discuss risks that can lead to falls and injury and the best way to avoid them. HindmanWhite

ONS is awarded AIUM Ultrasound Practice Accreditation

The Ultrasound Practice Accreditation Council of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) has awarded ONS with ultrasound practice accreditation in the area of MSK Print(Ultrasound-guided Interventional Procedures).

ONS achieved this recognition by meeting rigorous voluntary guidelines set by the diagnostic ultrasound profession. All facets of the practice were assessed, including the training and qualifications of physicians and sonographers; ultrasound equipment maintenance; documentation; storage, and record-keeping practices; policies and procedures to protect patients and staff; quality assurance methods; and the thoroughness, technical quality and interpretation of the sonograms the pracitice performs.

The AIUM is a multidisciplinary medical association of more than 9900 physicians, sonographers, and scientists dedicated to advancing the safe and effective use of ultrasound in medicine through professional and public education, research, development of guidelines and accreditation.

 

ONS Featured in Greenwich Sentinel

sentinel_logo_transparentYou can learn about the early days of ONS and the philosophy that made us the most comprehensive and advanced practice the region. The writer, Sara Poirier Correa, did an excellent job explaining that with 22 top sub-specialty trained physicians, ONS is able to provide personalized services to patients. The article also highlights the Women’s Sports Medicine Center and the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education, which has published internationally and competes among researchers at larger universities such as Harvard, Yale, and Johns Hopkins. http://bit.ly/1PNTkfh

 

Tips to Prevent Back Injury from Shoveling Snow

If the local forecasts are to be believed, many of us will be doing a fair amount of snow shoveling this weekend. Before you bundle up and head out, though, Dr. Jeffery Heftler, an interventional pain Blog-shoveling show 300 pxspecialist at Orthopedic and Neurosurgery Specialists (ONS) in Greenwich and Stamford, has a few words of advice to protect your back from strain and injury.

“The most important thing is to stay ahead of the accumulation of snow. It’s much easier on your back to shovel after every few inches has fallen than to wait and lift heavier loads of snow for a longer period of time,” he advises. Waiting can make the task even harder if the snow melts and then freezes over. Dr. Heftler also recommends investing in so called “push shovels” that are specially designed for pushing the snow aside while shovels with bent handles can help ease the tension on back and shoulders.

Without a doubt, Dr. Heftler sees more patients with back pain following a large snow storm. One reason, he suggests, is that people tend to think of shoveling snow as a nuisance and chore, when in fact it is an intense and strenuous exercise. “All too often, people who are generally inactive underestimate the physical challenge involved in clearing snow. Even someone in good shape can strain their back from the rotation of lifting the snow and throwing it over their shoulder,”   he says.

To protect your back, it’s best to take a few moments to warm up your muscles before going out in the cold. When shoveling, maintain the correct posture and technique to minimize the pressure on your weaker back muscles. Avoid rounding your lower back, for instance. Instead, go through the motions with a straight back leaning forward and your knees slightly bent. Use your core, hips and hamstrings to provide strength and stability instead of relying on your back and shoulder muscles to do the heavy lifting.

People with pre-existing back conditions are most vulnerable to shoveling related injuries and should avoid the activity altogether. “Even if you have to hire someone to clear the snow for you, it will pay for itself in terms of avoiding pain and days lost from work and winter sports,” Heftler says.

If you do experience pain while shoveling, Dr. Heftler says to stop, go inside and rest in a comfortable position until the discomfort passes. He recommends anti-inflammatory medications such as Advil or Aleve, and using ice or heat directly on the area where the pain is most acute. If the pain is severe and persists through the next day, consult with a physician.