New Pain Reducing Procedure Studied by ONS Orthopedic Surgeons

Greenwich orthopedic surgeon Dr. Paul Sethi and the ONS practice were featured in an article in Greenwich Patch for using a new pain-reducing procedure that can reduce or eliminate the need for narcotics.

In the article, Greenwich Surgeon Strives to Combat Opioid Epidemic with New Procedure, Greenwich Patch staff writer, Rich Scinto, wrote that oftentimes opioid addiction begins after surgery. 

Following is the article in its entirety:
Opioids post-surgery have become a double-edged sword in the wake of an increasing addiction epidemic. While they have great pain-reducing powers, they also carry the risk of addiction and the chance that pills can fall into the hands of an addict.

A group of orthopedic surgeons based in Greenwich are using a new pain-relieving method that helps reduce a patient’s reliance on opioids.

Dr. Paul Sethi with Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists recently has seen collegiate athletes in need of surgery who are willing to suffer great amounts of pain if it means staying off of opioids post-surgery.

“Young people are becoming more aware of how dangerous of a problem it is,” Sethi said about opioid addiction.

It is also frightening as a surgeon to think that an opioid prescription that is intended to help a patient recover could lead to death or a lifelong battle with addiction, he said.

Sethi has been performing shoulder replacement surgeries with the use of Exparel, which is an injection of long-lasting liposomal bupivacaine that can last for three days post-surgery. Some patients have used no narcotics or a greatly reduced amount after the surgery, Sethi said.

Instead of prescribing 30 narcotic pills post-surgery generally there is only a need to prescribe 10, he said. That translates to less pills that could fall into an addict’s hands.

The prescription of opioid pain relievers has skyrocketed. In 2013 health-care providers wrote 259 million prescriptions, enough for every American adult to have a bottle of pills, according to the CDC.

About 70 percent of opioids used for non-medical reasons are obtained through family or friends and 18 percent through a prescribing doctor, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

Sethi and others are conducting a peer-reviewed study about Exparel’s effectiveness in reducing pain after surgery.

Sethi and others at the practice plan to expand the use of Exparel to other types of shoulder surgery and there is potential to use it in operations such as ACL repairs. The injection has to be specifically tailored to each surgery in order for it to be effective, he said.

Surgeons should spend a good amount of time educating their patients about pain management and the potential for opioid abuse.

“In medicine we are pressed for time, but I think this is one of the most important things we teach our patients about,” he said.

The injection costs about $300 extra, which is a bargain if it can save a person from an overdose death or a long struggle with addiction, Sethi said.

For now narcotics still are prescribed in case pain comes back after Exparel wears off.

Double Shoulder Replacement Restores Mobility

Shoulder replacement regains his active lifestyle just months following surgery.

Arthritis had taken its toll on Dave’s shoulders. He was in constant pain. Sleeping was difficult and it was nearly impossible for him to take part in activities that he loves.  Then, two friends with similar shoulder issuesD.Hapke in Kayak referred Dave to shoulder surgeon, Dr. Seth Miller at ONS.  “When I met him, I immediately knew he was the doctor I wanted to care for me. He was thorough, thoughtful and patient. He has a great bedside manner and took the time to completely answer all my questions,” he recalled. 

Dave had his first shoulder replacement in January, 2013; the second one was done a year later. In both instances, the therapists had him doing exercises the day after surgery, which he continued at home within the week. Through a physical therapy program over the next few months, Dave was able to build muscle mass to help support his new shoulders.

Just 16 weeks after surgery, Dave was back on the water kayaking pain free. These days, he goes to the gym 2- 3 times a week and kayaks quite a bit on ponds, lakes and streams. He can even carry his  kayak.

“I am so grateful to have my active life back, thanks to ONS!” he said.

Shoulder replacement surgery and reverse shoulder replacement surgery is not for everyone. In many cases, treatment such as icing, anti-inflammatory medication and physical therapy can help get shoulder pain from arthritis under control. However, if pain persists, as it did with Dave, it may be time to consider a surgical option, notes Dr. Miller.

With arthritis and some fractures and injuries, the cartilage of the shoulder gradually wears away, creating a situation where bone is rubbing against bone. The resulting inflammation is extremely painful and makes shoulder mobility progressively more difficult. This condition typically develops later in life and gets worse over time.

The shoulder replacement procedure replaces the damaged joint with a highly-polished metal ball attached to a stem and a plastic socket. As long as a patient has an intact functioning rotator cuff, it can be an extremely successful procedure.

However, there is a group of patients that not only have significant cartilage damage in their shoulder, but also have a torn rotator cuff that is beyond repair. The rotator cuff is a group of muscles that run from the shoulder blade to the upper arm and allows patient to elevate their arm. Twenty years ago, treatment options were limited. In 2004, the FDA approved a reverse shoulder replacement procedure that was being used successfully overseas.

The surgery takes about two hours and involves a small incision, usually about three to four inches in length. Patients can expect to stay in the hospital somewhere from one to three days. Patients will be released with their arm in a sling, and undergo exercises to reestablish range of motion with the joint.

Between four and eight weeks after surgery, patients should be able to raise their arms above their heads without pain. Three to four months after surgery, patients are gradually resuming the activities of daily living. Many patients remark after recovery that they feel like they’ve been given their life back.

ONS’ Dr. Seth Miller was one of the first in the metropolitan area to perform reverse shoulder replacement surgery. He will take part in a Joint Replacement Symposium at Greenwich Hospital with ONS colleagues and joint replacement surgeons Drs. Frank Ennis and Brian Kavanagh.

The event will be held on Wed. May 11 starting at 6 p.m.  To register, call 203-863-4277 or online.

ONS Surgeon Named Doctor of Distinction

Paul Sethi, MD, was named one of Fairfield County’s Doctors of Distinction by Westfair Communications.

Dr. Sethi, a sports medicine specialist and orthopedic surgeon at ONS, will be presented with the Cutting Edge Award  at the annual Fairfield County Doctors of Distinction Awards ceremony on Tuesday, May 3.  Dr. Sethi has received this recognition from Westfair Communications for his ongoing research into improving orthopedic surgical procedures  and help in creating international orthopedic surgical standards.  Doctors of Distinction

As President of the  ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education, Dr. Sethi’s research has recently included the establishment of  better methods for surgical skin preparation (cleaning) to lower the risk of surgical infection; development of a new technique to repair chronic or weakened biceps tendons; and the evaluation of surgical needles in tendon surgery to establish international guidelines on needle use. Additionally, Dr. Sethi has recently contributed a textbook chapter on shoulder fractures, and two chapters on treating elbow injuries in throwing athletes.

Learn more about Dr. Sethi’s outstanding career here.

 

ONS Physicians Open State-of-the-Art Ambulatory Surgery Center

Stamford ASC is a new ultra-modern ambulatory surgery center designed specifically for orthopedic surgery and neurosurgery. Clain ASC_edited-1

The Stamford ASC has recently received Connecticut State Department of Health approval for license and is now open for physicians to treat patients. Stamford ASC specializes in musculoskeletal surgeries and interventional pain management. The center includes two surgical suites built specifically for orthopedic and neurosurgical procedures, equipped with the latest arthroscopic and computer-assisted technology. The facility also has a procedure room for interventional pain management, a comfortable waiting room, and pre-operative and post-operative areas designed for utmost safety, comfort and efficiency. The technologically advanced surgery center offers patients access to the same arthroscopic and open surgery options found in a hospital setting but in a smaller, more comfortable environment.
Entrance 2 (2)

The warm surroundings of the center and emphasis on caring, individualized attention minimizes the stress often associated with surgery. Patients are released within hours of their procedure so they may complete their recovery in the comfort of home. Covered parking and a ground level entrance help make the patient experience as easy and convenient as possible.
“The Stamford ASC is the result of several years of research and planning, which began when ONS partners with a shared mission set out to build an industry-leading surgical care facility,” said Mark Camel, M.D., one of the Stamford ASC partners.

Formed by 14 experienced and respected orthopedic surgeons and neurosurgeons affiliated with Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists (ONS) in Greenwich and Stamford CT, the Stamford ASC reflects the standard of excellence that patients have come to expect from surgeons at ONS. “In the current healthcare environment, patients are looking for a more personalized surgery experience that is first and foremost, safe and efficient,” said Dr. James Cunningham, Medical Director of Stamford ASC. “This center will provide service that meets, if not exceeds, the most stringent Government safety requirements and infection controls.” The center was surveyed and approved by the Connecticut State Department of Health earlier this month.

“High quality outpatient facilities such as Stamford ASC best position physicians for healthcare industry challenges by combining cost efficiency with cutting edge technology and a new kind of patient experience,” said Dr. Cunningham. “I fully expect that the Stamford ASC will set the standard for efficient, cost-effective and patient-focused care in the region.”

Read the local press coverage in Greenwich Time and on the Daily Voice

New ACL Repair Study

New ACL Repair Study is Promising but Limited, said ONS Knee Surgeon Demetris Delos, MD.

Today’s New York Times reports that using a patient’s own blood to help heal an ACL tear has shown promising results in a small study conducted by the Boston Children’s Hospital.  While having a torn ligament heal itself could be the holy grail of ligament surgery, ONS knee surgeon, Demetris Delos, MD, cautions that more thorough research is ACL-Injury-300dpi-illustrationneeded.  The trial involved only 10 patients and recovery was tracked just a few months after surgery. “These early results are exciting,” Dr. Delos said, “but it is important to see how these patients do in the medium and long term (several years after surgery) especially when it comes to returning to active lifestyles and the trials need to be expanded to much larger groups of  people to see how it translates to the population at large.”  Until the long term safety and efficacy can be determined, he said, current ACL reconstruction surgery, which replaces the injured ligament with a tendon from other areas of the body such as the hamstring or patellar tendon, will remain the standard as it has proven successful with predictable results and allows the majority of patients to return to their pre-injury activities.

Paul Sethi, MD, Returns from International Teaching Engagement in India

Dr. Sethi teaching “Shoulder Surgical Techniques" in a live operating room setting, Dehli, India.
Dr. Sethi teaching “Shoulder Surgical Techniques” in a live operating room setting, Dehli, India.

Dr. Paul Sethi, ONS Orthopedic Surgeon and President of ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education, recently returned from an international teaching engagement at the 2015 Delhi Arthroscopy Course in Delhi, India. The annual live surgery course draws physicians and residents from around the world to learn new techniques and methodologies for difficult surgical steps. Surgeries are performed by prominent national and international faculty with the opportunity for physicians to observe complex operating techniques and solutions during live surgeries. The forum also provides the opportunity to interact with the teaching surgeons and to ask pertinent questions.

Dr. Sethi specializes in sports medicine and shoulder surgery and was invited to teach “Shoulder Surgical Techniques” to 170 attendees from across India. This was his first teaching engagement in India, however he is accustomed to the international platform having previously instructed in Canada and Europe.

During the course, he performed three shoulder procedures: rotator cuff repair, labrum repair and reverse shoulder replacement. Being unfamiliar with the particular instrumentation used at the Sports Injury Centre, Safdarjang Hospital, Dr. Sethi adapted his techniques to the instruments available to perform complex surgeries. Dr. Sethi emphasized the importance of finding solutions to a variety of situations that a surgeon may encounter in any operating room. The result of his work speaks to his medical knowledge and skill that spans nearly twenty years of experience. Arthroscopy Course Organizational Secretary, Dr. Deepak Joshi recently reported, “The tips and ease with which these complex cases were done have been well appreciated by the faculty and delegates.”

Dr. Sethi’s experience traveling and teaching has led him to a better understanding of the challenges and solutions used by surgeons in other parts of the world. He says, “ten years ago the platforms were very different from one another, not because one is more advanced than the other, but because methods, thought processes, techniques and instruments differ. Today platforms are more aligned.” Teaching allows him to consider why some methods are used and also to learn from other accomplished surgeons.

Dr. Sethi honored by Dr. Prasad, Director General of Healthcare Services in India.
Dr. Sethi honored by Dr. Prasad, Director General of Healthcare Services in India.

Dr. Sethi said he feels “privileged to have had the opportunity to meet and be honored by Dr. Prasad, Director General of Healthcare Services in India.” He was also thanked by Dr. Deepak Chaudhary, Director of the Sports Injury Center for his valuable contribution to this important educational event and hopes Dr. Sethi will assist in planning future courses.

Later this year, Dr. Sethi will teach in Dubai, Bangkok, and in Florida, Los Angeles and Las Vegas in the United States. Being informed and at the cutting edge of medical research and technology motivates him to travel and teach. He was recently the lead author on the article, “Efficacy of topical benzoyl peroxide on the reduction of Propionibacterium acnes during shoulder surgery” that appeared in The Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, Volume 24, Issue 7 (July 2015).

Are shoes the culprit of foot pain?

ONS orthopedic surgeon Dr. Michael Clain, who specializes in foot and ankle surgery met with News 12 On Health Reporter Gillian Neff to discuss whether the cause of foot pain is related to shoes.

news12_Clain

Dr.Clain says foot issues like bunions and hammer toes are exacerbated by shoes. Bunions may appear to be bumps growing on the foot, but they’re actually bones shifted out of place by frequent wear and tear and it is best to find shoes that can accomodate your feet comfortably. Watch the NEWS12 “What’s Ailing You: Aching Foot Pain” with Gillian Neff.

For more on bunion surgery and the results read: Suffer from Bunion Pain? Dr. Clain Offers Solutions.

ONS is Expanding!

Stamford announcment art.smWe are excited to announce that ONS will open an expanded, state-of-the-art office and physical therapy facility at 5 High Ridge Park in North Stamford in June. Construction began in January and is expected to be completed by the end of May.

The Stamford location will offer a team of physicians and clinical staff dedicated to that office. Some of our other surgeons from Greenwich will also maintain a schedule to see patients in Stamford on a weekly basis. In addition to the doctors’ office, the site will feature a state-of-the-art physical therapy facility outfitted with the latest equipment in an aesthetically comfortable and healing environment.

The new facility is being added in order to accommodate ONS’s growing patient population in the Stamford, New Canaan, Darien and surrounding communities. “Many of our patients come from the Stamford area. Now they can receive the excellent level of orthopedic and neurosurgical care they count on without having to drive to Greenwich,” explained Dr. Seth Miller. In house x-ray and a fully integrated electronic medical records system will make the ONS Stamford office a convenient choice for patients in that area.

Who is Tommy John and why did he have surgery?

Putting On White GlovesWhat is Tommy John surgery? Dr. Sethi and Yu Darvish of the Texas Rangers know. It is when an individual undergoes the reconstruction of a torn ulnar collateral ligament. Dr. Paul Sethi of ONS is a disciple of Dr. Frank Jobe, the man who did an ulnar collateral graft in Tommy John’s elbow in ’74 and so created the most famous baseball-medical connection since Lou Gehrig’s disease (also known as, ALS).

Another person to know in this field is Dr.Glenn Fleisig, a man who is well versed in this topic and has made a career out of arm injuries. He was recently interviewed in an article about the Tommy John surgery after a presentation at MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference about his collaborative study with Stan Conte of the Los Angeles Dodgers.

The research in the study noted that the Tommy John surgery is becoming more common, as more pitchers had the surgery in 2014 than in the 90’s combined. Although the success rate of the surgery is high, 20 percent of pitchers never regain a full level of performance even after PT. Other topics covered in the interview include:

  • What causes tears and the surgeries that follow
  • Whether it is the arm speed or the pitcher has his forearm cocked that far back
  • How long should we expect a pitcher to be out after TJ nowadays
  • Overuse of the ligament
  • Risk Factors and more

Read the Grantland article in order to enjoy the full interview about the Tommy John surgery.

Greenwich Hospital Announces New Chief of Staff, ONS Neurosurgeon Paul Apostolides, MD

Paul Apostolides, MD Neurosurgeon
Paul Apostolides, MD
Neurosurgeon

Dr. Paul Apostolides, Section Head of the division of Neurosurgery at Greenwich Hospital, has been appointed hospital Chief of Staff as of January 1. Dr. Apostolides joined Greenwich Hospital’s medical staff in 1998 and has served on many committees including the credentialing committee, executive committee and peer review committee. For three years prior to his current appointment, he was Assistant Chief of Staff. He has served on the Greenwich Hospital Board since 2012.

A graduate of Stanford University and University of Massachusetts Medical School, Dr. Apostolides completed his residency and fellowship training at the Barrow Neurological Institute. He is board certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery, and is in practice with Orthopaedic & Neurosurgery Specialists (ONS) in Greenwich. He specializes in minimally invasive as well as complex reconstructive spinal surgeries.

ONS is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice serving patients throughout Fairfield and Westchester Counties and the New York Metropolitan area. ONS physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com, or call (203) 869-1145.

Accomplished Orthopedic Surgeon joins ONS Sports Medicine Team

Marc Kowalsky MDOrthopedic surgeon and fellowship trained sports medicine specialist Marc Kowalsky, MD has joined the ONS team. Dr. Kowalsky has expertise in conservative and operative treatments of upper and lower extremity sports injury, as well as complex shoulder and elbow pathology including degenerative disease, and trauma.  He has a particular interest in the management of shoulder and elbow arthritis, instability, rotator cuff tears, labral injury, and cartilage disorders.

Dr. Kowalsky looks for rehab-focused, non-operative solutions whenever possible, recommending surgery when it will be most effective. His goal is to return patients quickly, safely and fully to their best function and performance.

Dr. Kowalsky earned his medical degree at Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA where he also earned an MBA in Health Management. He did his residency in orthopedic surgery at Columbia University Medical Center, New York Orthopaedic Hospital in New York, NY. He also completed fellowship training in shoulder and elbow surgery at Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO and in sports medicine at Lenox Hill Hospital, Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine & Athletic Trauma, New York, NY.

He has authored original research manuscripts, review articles, and textbook chapters focusing on AC joint reconstruction, rotator cuff repair, and shoulder replacement. He currently serves as a reviewer for the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery and the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery.

“Dr. Kowalsky will be a great asset to our practice as we meet the growing demand for musculoskeletal care in Fairfield and Westchester counties,” said Dr. Seth Miller. “His high level of training and accomplishments reflect the ONS standard of offering the highest level of care possible to our patients.” He is in network with Aetna and Oxford/United Healthcare.

ONS Success Story: William McHale

William McHale TestimonialWilliam McHale started off as many other athletes did, full of energy and feeling invincible. As we all know, that feeling of invincibility is only a feeling. In the 7th grade, young William broke his ankle playing football; fortunately he was then referred to Dr. Paul Sethi.

Dr. Sethi considers all of the athlete’s needs which helps set the stage for a successful and timely recovery period and translates into an ideal patient-doctor experience.  When McHale got older, he started as a linebacker in 30 consecutive games between his sophomore and senior years at  Yale University. During his senior year though, the labrums in both of his shoulders tore. Time was of the essence if he wanted to recover in time for his Pro Day in front of NFL Scouts. Who did he contact? None other than our very own Dr. Sethi.

The MRIs originally taken of the injury did not reveal the full extent of the damage but Dr. Sethi corrected all issues encountered during the surgery. After the procedure, William was scheduled to go to physical therapy multiple times a week and overall, it took about six to seven months for a full recovery. Since then, William has not had any other issues regarding his shoulders.

Where is William McHale now? He played to his full potential on Pro Day, was invited to Minicamp with the New Orleans Saints, and just returned from playing football in France; congratulations!

ONS Orthopedic Surgeon Seth Miller, MD, Elected to Join Elite Medical Society

Seth Miller, MD
ONS Orthopaedic Surgeon, Seth Miller, MD

At the October Closed Meeting of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), held in Pinehurst, NC, ONS (Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists) orthopedic surgeon Dr. Seth Miller was elected to join the ASES organization.  “Membership in ASES is a privilege and an honor” said Dr. Jim Cunningham, ONS Vice President. Membership in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons is by invitation only. Only experienced orthopedic surgeons who have completed a fellowship in shoulder surgery, elbow surgery, and/or sports medicine are considered for membership.

Dr. Miller, in his 25th year in practice at ONS in Greenwich, has ascended quickly in his career being recognized with such a national honor.  Candidates must meet strict academic and clinical requirements to become members of ASES.

“ASES is a remarkable collection of like-minded surgeons, and researchers who, through their collaboration and the sharing of techniques and outcomes, work together to solve the most complicated and pressing shoulder and elbow disorders. Founded on the premise that by such sharing of ideas we can determine the most efficient, cost effective, high quality shoulder and elbow care” said Dr. Robert Bell, ASES President.

The American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons was created to enhance the study of Conditions_shouldershoulder and elbow surgery and to foster advances in the field, serving as an educational body responsible for scientific programs and advances.  The Mission of the ASES is to support the ethical practice of evidence-based, high quality, cost-effective, shoulder and elbow care.

The society global impact on quality shoulder and elbow care is achieved through leadership, medical education, scientific research, and patient advocacy. Congratulations to Dr. Miller on becoming an Associate Member of the society.

ONS is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice serving patients throughout Fairfield and Westchester Counties and the New York Metropolitan area. ONS physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com, or call (203) 869-1145.

Orthopaedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist Dr. Demetris Delos on NY Giants Victor Cruz’s Injury

Dr. Delos served as Assistant NFL Team Physician for the New York Football Giants and

Demetris Delos, MD
Demetris Delos, MD

team physician for local high school and college athletes. His practice is focused on sports medicine and arthroscopic treatment of knee and shoulder disorders including knee preservation surgery, shoulder instability and rotator cuff repair. Upon hearing about the NY Giants’ Wide Receiver Victor Cruz’s knee injury, we reached out to Dr. Delos to give us insight on Victor’s type of injury. Dr. Delos said:

“Victor Cruz sustained a devastating injury to his knee last night, an injury that will cost him the rest of the season. While attempting to catch a ball in the end zone, he tore the patellar tendon in his right knee. The patellar tendon is a structure that attaches the kneecap (patella) to the shinbone (tibia). When the patellar tendon is torn, the player cannot straighten (extend) his knee and obviously cannot perform at the high level expected in the NFL.

Patellar tendon ruptures are relatively uncommon injuries that occur in otherwise healthy players without any predisposing factors. The mechanism of injury is typically eccentric overload (forcibly bending the knee while the quadricep is firing).

Studies of NFL players with this injury report that the vast majority are able to return to NFL level play after surgery and extensive rehabilitation. Let’s wish Victor a speedy recovery so we can watch him salsa in the end zone again!”

For more information on knee injuries, visit Our Specialties page.

ONS Orthopedic Surgeon and Hand Specialist, Mark Vitale, MD Presents at 69th Annual American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH)

Dr Vitale Portrait -sm web
Mark Vitale, MD

September 19, 2014, ONS orthopedic hand surgeon Dr. Mark Vitale traveled to Boston at the 69th annual American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH), the premier annual hand surgery meeting where the nation’s leading hand surgeons gather to present new research and techniques for the care of hand, wrist, nerve and upper extremity problems.

Dr. Vitale presented two of the conferences’ 84 podium presentations to the community of hand surgeons in the U.S. and abroad. One of his presentations entitled, “Intra-articular fractures of the sigmoid notch of the distal radius: an analysis of progression to distal radioulnar joint arthritis and impact on upper extremity function in surgically treated fractures,” was a study that looked at fractures of one of the understudied joints of the wrist. This study will help surgeons guide treatment of these fractures to optimize wrist function in surgically treated fractures.

Traditional treatments for thumb arthritis involve removing the arthritic bone in the wrist called the trapezium which forms a joint with the base of the thumb and then using part of a patient’s own tendon to reconstruct the thumb. Dr. Vitale’s research revealed that the results with this more traditional “trapeziectomy” surgery are excellent and time tested.21

Dr. Vitale Speaking at the ASSH His second presentation, “A comparison of pyrolytic carbon hemiarthrioplasty versus Thompson suspensionplasty in the treatment of trapezial metacarpal arthritis,” was a study that compared a traditional treatment for thumb arthritis with a new pyrocarbon joint replacement for the thumb.

Pyrolytic carbon joint replacement is a synthetic implant to replace the arthritic thumb/wrist joint that was initially developed and first used in conjunction with hand surgeons at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. It resurfaces the base of the arthritic thumb metacarpal bone while leaving more of the native trapezium bone in place. The pyrolytic joint replacement implant has been used since the early 2000s. The result of this study found some improved function in patients treated with the pyrocarbon joint replacement, but also a higher risk of need for future surgeries in those treated with the newer joint replacement.

Hand surgeons today debate about what surgical procedures are most appropriate for severely arthritic thumbs. The results of Dr. Vitale’s research will now help guide surgeons around the country to better treat patients.

Dr. Vitale commented, “The ASSH conference was a great success. The ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education has provided us with an incredible state of the art research and biomechanics lab from which we continue to drive the field of hand surgery, sports medicine and orthopedic surgery.”

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists PC (ONS) is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice in Greenwich, CT. ONS physicians provide expertise in sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, please visit www.onsmd.com.

Is tennis your game? Do you love the pace on the squash or paddle court?

RacketSportsTennisWoman If you love racket sports, you might already know what it’s like to experience a rolled ankle or shoulder strain. Injury prevention is the key to staying in the game and ONS is here to help you keep your swing healthy! On Tuesday, May 13th at 6:30 p.m. in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, come hear sports medicine physician Gloria Cohen, MD, orthopedic surgeon Katie Vadasdi, MD, physical therapist Tatyana Kalyuzhny, PT, DPT, MDT and Patrick Hirscht, Tennis Pro, Round Hill Club in Greenwich discuss how to avoid the most common injuries in racket sports like Achilles tendon tears, shoulder and wrist injuries and rolled and sprained ankles. Learn to recognize injury warning signs and know when it’s time to see a doctor. The panel will discuss injury prevention and the latest orthopedic treatments.

Dr. Katie Vadasdi, head of the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center shares her medical expertise and experience in treating these types of injuries saying “racket sports can lead to overuse injuries due to the repetitive motions required in these sports. We most commonly see shoulder and elbow injuries including impingement of the rotator cuff and inflammation of the tendons in the elbow also known as tennis elbow. Early in the season, it is important to gradually increase intensity and duration of play to reduce the risk of developing such overuse injuries. If an athlete develops pain, it is important to rest in order to allow for appropriate recovery.  This can often prevent the development of more serious injuries.  If pain persists in spite of rest, then an athlete should reach out to a medical professional for further diagnosis and management options”.

Come to the seminar to learn more! Seminar is free. Registration requested.

For more information on shoulder injuries/surgery click here!

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit http://onsmd.com/ or call 203.869.1145.

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