ONS MDs to Discuss Chronic Pain

Demetris Delos, MD and Christopher Sahler, MD of ONS to discuss effective treatments for Chronic Pain.

Maintaining quality of life while living with chronic pain is no easy feat. Two orthopedic specialists from ONS will discuss effective new treatments to help people with relentless pain return to the WavenyPain Flyer (2)activities they enjoy.  Join Demetris Delos, MD, an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in sports medicine an comprehensive knee and shoulder, and interventional pain management physiatrist, Christopher Sahler, MD for this informative talk on Wednesday, May 11 at The Inn at Waveny, 73 Oenoke Ridge in New Canaan.  Doors open at 4:00 pm for refreshments. Presentation begins at 4:30. RSVP at 203-594-5310 or mntiri@waveny.org.

 

Regenerative Medicine Benefits

Dr. Christopher Sahler
Dr. Christopher Sahler

ONS pain management specialist, Christopher Sahler, MD, will discuss the benefits of regenerative medicine at Greenwich Hospital talk.

Does your own blood hold the key to healing your medical condition? The evolving field of regenerative medicine uses biomedical materials, often from your own body, to regenerate cells and rebuild diseased and damaged tissues. Join Dr. Christopher Sahler to learn about this exciting new medical field that uses therapies from blood, platelets and stem cells to treat pain and cure complex, often chronic conditions of the musculoskeletal system.  Healing Yourself: The Promise of Regenerative Medicine for Chronic Pain and Orthopaedic Care will take place on Thursday, March 10 at Greenwich Hospital’s Noble Auditorium.  6 – 7:30 pm. Free.  To register, call 203-863-4277 or go to greenwichhospital.org.

Joint Replacement Symposium at Greenwich Hospital

hip replacementOn Wednesday, April 22nd, at 6:00 p.m., orthopedic surgeon/ joint replacement specialists from ONS and Greenwich Hospital will present a joint replacement symposium in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital located at 5 Perryridge Road. Knee and hip specialists Frank Ennis, MD and Brian Kavanagh, MD; and shoulder specialist Seth Miller, MD will present information about the latest advances in joint replacement, including computer-assisted and minimal incision, muscle sparing techniques. Information about preparing for joint replacement, pain management and what to expect from the recovery process will be addressed by hospital anesthesiology, nursing and physical therapy department staff.

Many people suffer from severe pain caused by arthritis, a fracture or other conditions that make common activities such as walking, putting on shoes and socks or getting in and out of a car, extremely difficult. Today, over 900,000 hip and knee replacement surgeries are performed each year in the United States. An additional 53,000 shoulder replacements are performed. Deciding if and when it’s time to consider joint replacement surgery are important decisions.  This educational symposium is designed to provide anyone who is considering joint replacement with pertinent information to assist them in making the right decision for them.

Frank Ennis, MD specializes in hip and knee replacement and is fellowship trained in adult reconstructive surgery. Dr. Ennis is among the first orthopedic surgeons in the New York area to perform computer-assisted joint replacement. He completed undergraduate studies at Yale University and post-baccalaureate pre-medical studies at Harvard University. He graduated from Duke University School of Medicine and completed a residency at Yale University Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. He received his fellowship training at New England Baptist Hospital in Boston.

Dr. Kavanagh
Dr. Kavanagh

Brian Kavanagh, MD has performed over 6500 joint replacement surgeries in the past 25 years. He graduated Princeton University and earned a medical degree at University of Connecticut School of Medicine. He did his internship and residency at the Mayo Clinic, Mayo Graduate School of Medicine in Rochester, Minnesota, and served on the faculty at the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine for seven years. Dr. Kavanagh was on the teaching staff at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven for five years. Dr. Kavanagh was also an instructor in the hip and knee total joint fellowship program.

Seth Miller, MD is a graduate of Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. After his residency at New York Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, he completed a research fellowship at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York and a shoulder surgery fellowship at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. He served as an orthopaedic consultant to the New York Mets for more than eight years.  He is the current President of ONS.

All three surgeons are on staff at Greenwich Hospital, a recipient of The Joint Commission’s “Gold Seal of Approval™” for total hip and knee replacement surgery and spinal fusion. The certification for hip and knee replacement procedures recognizes the hospital’s commitment to maintain clinical excellence and patient satisfaction, while continuously working to improve patient care.  Greenwich Hospital’s total joint replacement program offers a level of continuity that sets it apart from other facilities. A clinical resource nurse helps patients every step of the way – before, during and after surgery and throughout rehabilitation and recovery. Patients receive the practical information, emotional support and follow-up care they need to guide them through the entire process.

You will have the opportunity to ask questions at the conclusion of the talk.  The program is free and open to the public. Registration Requested. Call (203) 863-4277 or register online at www.greenhosp.org.

Shoulder Pain? (Part I)

Marc Kowalsky MD
Marc Kowalsky, MD.

ONS welcomes Dr. Kowalsky,  a board-certified orthopedic surgeon with expertise in rehab-focused, as well as operative treatments for upper and lower extremity sports injury, and complex shoulder and elbow conditions including degenerative disease, trauma, and revision surgery. He has also authored original research manuscripts, review articles, textbook chapters focusing on AC joint reconstruction, rotator cuff repair, and shoulder replacement, and now he is adding to the educational articles ONS provides.

Shoulder pain is the second most common musculoskeletal complaint to a primary care physician, behind only back pain. Twenty percent of the population will suffer from shoulder pain during their lifetime.  A variety of conditions can contribute to shoulder pain, ranging from rotator cuff problems to arthritis of the shoulder joint.

The rotator cuff tendon consists of the tendons of the four muscles that originate on the shoulder blade and insert on the humerus adjacent to the ball of the shoulder joint.  These muscles participate in rotation and elevation of the arm.  A bursa, or fluid-filled sac, lies on top of the rotator cuff tendon, and helps to protect or shield the tendon from the adjacent structures of the shoulder as the tendon glides.

Although most people who present to their physician with a rotator cuff problem likely have simple tendonitis, or bursitis, some may in fact have a rotator cuff tear.  At least twenty-five percent of people over the age of sixty may have a tear in the rotator cuff tendon.  Most of these tears are chronic and degenerative in nature, without any traumatic cause.  These patients experience shoulder pain with motion away from the body and overhead, typically along the side of the shoulder and arm.  They may also experience night pain that awakens them from sleep.

Some patients may also notice weakness, depending on the size of the tear.  A rotator cuff tear, once present, is unlikely to heal on its own, and may enlarge over time.  Nevertheless, many patients with a tear can be successfully treated with conservative means, including physical therapy, oral anti-inflammatory medication, and perhaps an injection of corticosteroid.  For those patients who do continue to experience pain due to a rotator cuff tear, operative repair is an option.  This procedure is typically performed arthroscopically, and consists of anchoring of the torn tendon to its attachment site with a series of small screws, or anchors.  Ultimately this procedure is effective in improving a patient’s pain and overall function. (…to be continued)

If this topic interests you keep an eye out for the next installment and attend Dr. Kowalsky’s upcoming seminar on March 12th at Greenwich Hospital. The program is free and open to the public.
Registration Requested. Call (203) 863-4277, or register online at www.greenhosp.org.

The Fragile Feet: A Gymnast Story (Part II)

Gymnast
Gymnast on balance beam.

Remember last week’s post? Surprisingly enough, gymnasts share a lot in common with ballerinas, especially in terms of injuries of the feet.

Both gymnasts and dancers place a tremendous amount of stress on their feet for a significant amount of time per week – often greater than 10 hours a day. Because of this combination of stress and time, stress fractures are common. Stress fractures can occur almost anywhere in the foot or ankle, but the most common locations are the metatarsals, navicular, tibia, calcaneus, and fibula. A key to avoiding stress fractures is proper nutrition, avoiding disturbances in the menstrual cycle, and proper technique and amount of training. A gymnast who trains 4 hours a week that increases the workload to 10 hours a week in preparation for a performance without any ramp up is a setup for stress fractures. A better way to ramp up training would be to increase the workload by approximately 25% per week, or going from 4 hours a week to 5 hours a week and so forth. The treatment of stress fractures varies depending on the location and character of the fractures. It also depends on the patients demands and expectations. In most situations a period of immobilization and rest is all that is necessary.

Young gymnasts often complain of various painful lumps and bumps on the feet. Some of these are calluses, which are the bodies response to repetitive force on areas of weight bearing. Another extra bone in the foot – the accessory navicular, also thought to exist in about 10% of all people – can be a troublemaker for gymnasts in particular. It is a tender prominence on the inside of the ankle. Flatfooted patients will sprain or strain the ligaments that attach to the accessory navicular. Continued activity worsens the symptoms and the first line treatment is a period of immobilization to allow it to heal. When that fails, the extra bone is excised, and the damaged tendons and ligaments on the inside of the ankle are repaired or reconstructed.

Many of the problems in both ballet and gymnastics results from the nature of the sports – long hours and repetition in little to no footwear. These patients are predisposed to develop certain problems based on the alignment or posture of the feet. Feet come in two general shapes – flat and high arched. In reality it is a spectrum. So many problems can be treated simply by accommodating or adjusting a patient’s flat or high arch with a specific type of shoe or insert (orthotic). Unfortunately, the competitive gymnast and dancer cannot wear athletic shoes or orthotics. Some may be able to train in orthotics or custom shoes and that is important to keep in mind.

Want to learn even more? Dr. Peden will be giving a seminar on “Solutions for Foot and Ankle Pain: Beyond a Foot Massage.”  The program is free and open to the public. Registration Requested. Call (203) 863-4277 or register online at www.greenhosp.org.

What do you do when you are diagnosed with an old (chronic) Achilles tendon rupture?

Sean C. Peden, MD
Sean C. Peden, MD

Sean Peden, MD is an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in foot and ankle surgery. Dr. Peden has expertise in treating a variety of foot pain and deformity related conditions including Achilles tendonitis, ankle instability, cartilage injuries, bunions and hammer toes.  His practice will also focus on youth athlete sports injuries and the types of injuries seen in field athletes, gymnasts and ballet dancers.

Achilles tendon ruptures will often not be discovered for months after the injury. In the months between injury and showing up at the doctor’s office, the torn tendon develops scar tissue which decreased the quality and elasticity of the tissue. Because of this, directly repairing the torn tendon, as is done in an acute injury, becomes is less than ideal. In this situation, we will supplement the tendon repair with a tendon transfer. Essentially, we borrow a tendon that bends the big toe (there is another tendon that compensates when it is borrowed), reroute it, and reattach it to the heel bone. This does two very important things:

 

1. It supplements the strength of the torn Achilles, allowing a quicker and better recovery.

2.It provides improved blood supply to the Achilles repair, providing healing factors to the area of diseased tendon.

In summary, ruptures of the Achilles Foot_AnklePictendon are increasingly common in our aging yet increasingly active population. In cases where an Achilles rupture is missed or the rupture cannot be repaired directly under normal tension, adding the flexor hallicus longus tendon transfer allows for significantly improved results with a shorter recovery.

If you suffer from foot and ankle pain and would like to attend a free seminar, Dr. Peden of ONS and Greenwich Hospital will present Solutions for Foot & Ankle Pain: Beyond Foot Massage is an orthopedic surgeon specializing in foot and ankle surgery. He will present treatments and surgical techniques for bunions and other foot deformities. Learn more and register online here.

ONS Physiatrist, Christopher Sahler, MD presents “Exercise as Treatment for Chronic Pain”

Christopher Sahler, MD
Christopher Sahler, MD

Christopher Sahler, MD of ONS and Greenwich Hospital, is an interventional physiatrist specializing in sports medicine. His focus is non-operative treatment of musculoskeletal injuries, restoring proper function, reducing pain and promoting active lifestyles.

If you are suffering from chronic pain, you are not alone. It is estimated that 100 million Americans are currently living with chronic pain. The pain may make it difficult just to get out of bed or do household chores, let alone be active and exercise. Studies have shown this inactivity can actually cause you to experience a worsened level of pain and for a longer period of time. Exercise actually improves your pain threshold. Even simple exercises such as walking can provide some benefit.

Join Dr. Sahler as he presents his first health Seminar “Exercise as Treatment for Chronic Pain” at Greenwich Hospital. Come learn how staying active and performing exercise may help treat an array of chronic pain conditions.

When: December 2nd, 2014
Time: 6:00 p.m.
Place: Noble Auditorium at Greenwich Hospital

The program is free and open to the public. Registration Requested.
Call (203) 863-4277 or register online at www.greenhosp.org.

ONS Physiatrist, Christopher Sahler, MD on post New York City Marathon Tips for Runners

Christopher Sahler, MD
Christopher Sahler, MD

Christopher S. Sahler, MD of ONS is an interventional physiatrists specializing in sports medicine. His focus is non-operative treatment of musculoskeletal injuries, restoring proper function, reducing pain and promoting active lifestyles.

“Each year 50,000 people participate in the NYC marathon. If you are in that group and completed the race this past weekend, congratulations! It is an exciting accomplishment that you will remember for the rest of your life.

Now that the race is over, there are a few key points to remember that will help to maximize your recovery and minimize pain. Many athletes experience worsening soreness over the following days after the race. This is known as delayed onset muscle soreness and typically is most painful 48-72 hours later. After the race, your body is in a depleted state so it is important to take in plenty of water and healthy food. A combination of complex carbohydrates and protein help the muscles to repair themselves and re-build their energy stores. It is also recommended that you perform light, short duration activities such as walking, gentle jogging, biking, swimming etc. This helps to increase blood flow to the muscles and tissues that need the nutrients the most and helps to wash away the built up metabolic byproducts such as lactic acid. Gentle stretching and soaking in a warm bath may also help loosen up the muscles. Depending on your previous activity level, it is important to give your body time off before re-starting any intense exercise routines. Most runners should take at least one month off.

Congratulations again on the race!”

Dr. Sahler will present “Exercise as Treatment for Chronic Pain.” Learn how exercise can be used as a safe and effective treatment for chronic pain conditions. This free health seminar will be in the Noble Conference room at Greenwich Hospital Tuesday, December 2 at 6:00 p.m.  To register call 203-863-4277 or register online at https://www.greenhosp.org/CREG/ClassDetails.aspx?sid=1&ClassID=5348

 

ONS Sports Medicine Specialist, Gloria Cohen, MD on Cycling Injuries

GloriaCohenbikingWEB_SMLike all activities engaged in regularly, cycling has its share of common ailments and injuries.  Many of the overuse injuries result from attempting to do too much, too soon. Poor riding technique, and improper frame fit for the individual may also cause injuries. Riding too many miles or tackling too many hills in too high a gear will stress the musculoskeletal system, especially at the start of the cycling season.

Knee pain is the most common complaint and is usually related to the tracking of the kneecap, or “patella” in the mid-groove of the thigh bone or “femur.”  The symptoms of “biker’s knee,” also known as “patellofemoral pain syndrome,” usually result from a combination of malalignment of the extensor mechanism of the knee, muscle imbalance, and improper set-up on the bike.  Each cyclist presents with differences in biomechanics (flat pronated feet, bow legs, etc.) and muscle conditioning (strength and flexibility) that can predispose to this condition.  It is important to avoid riding with high pedal resistance at a low cadence as this puts excessive pressure across the knee joint. The rule of the road is “if the knees hurt gear down.”

Some common riding errors are riding with the saddle too low or too far forward and poor foot position or improper cleat adjustment.  This can lead to other musculoskeletal injuries such as neck problems, or Achilles tendinitis.

We must not forget that traumatic injuries can occur when we least expect it. Wear an approved bicycle helmet at all times while cycling. Remember to replace your helmet if you are involved in a bike crash while wearing it. It will likely not perform for you the second time.

Gloria Cohen, MD is a specialist in non-operative sports medicine. She is a primary care team physician for the Columbia University varsity athletic teams and lecturer in the Department of Orthopaedics at Columbia University and served as team physician to the Canadian National Olympic Cycling Team for 14 years and was a member of the Canadian Medical Team for the Olympic Games in Seoul, Atlanta, and Sydney. She travels regularly with the Columbia University varsity football team, the Lions and is recognized as an authority in sports medicine in the United States and Canada.

Dr. Cohen believes in taking an integrative approach to medical management by considering a patients’ bio-mechanics, cardio-vascular and pulmonary function as it relates to athletic performance. Dr. Cohen is a successful competitive runner who has qualified twice for the New York Marathon. She is also an off-road and road cyclist and will be a featured speaker at Cycle Strong! A Sports Conditioning and Injury Prevention Workshop for Cycling Enthusiasts! This event is presented by ONS Foundation for Clinical Research, Inc. and sponsored by the North Castle Library, Armonk. For more information visit the ONS Foundation website.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit http://onsmd.com/ or call 203.869.1145.

Are You Considering Joint Replacement Surgery?

Orthopedic surgeons Frank Ennis, MD, Brian Kavanagh, MD, Seth Miller, MD, along with Greenwich Hospital’s anesthesiology, nursing and physical therapy staff will present an informative and comprehensive seminar about joint replacement surgery on Wednesday, April 2nd from 6-8pm. This free seminar will be presented in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital. The three joint replacement specialists will present comprehensive information about the latest advances in joint replacement such as computer-assisted surgery, minimally invasive and muscle sparing techniques. Also, information on how to prepare for joint replacement surgery, post-operative pain management and what to expect from the recovery process. The seminar is open to the public. Registration is required. To register, call (203) 863-4277 or register online at www.greenhops.org.

Download: Joint Replacement Surgery PDF

Dr. Ennis Leading joint replacement expert Frank Ennis, MD is a board-certified orthopedic surgeon and fellowship trained in adult reconstructive surgery. He is a specialist in hip and knee replacement is among the first orthopedic surgeons in the New York area to perform computer-assisted joint replacement. He completed his undergraduate studies at Yale University and post-baccalaureate pre-medical studies at Harvard University. Dr. Ennis graduated from Duke University School of Medicine and completed a residency at Yale University Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. He received fellowship training in adult reconstructive surgery at New England Baptist Hospital in Boston.

Dr. Brian Kavanagh Brian Kavanagh, MD has performed over 6000 joint replacement surgeries in the past 25 years and was one of the first surgeons in the New York area to perform minimal incision joint replacement. He is a board certified orthopedic surgeon who graduated from Princeton University and earned a medical degree at University of Connecticut School of Medicine. Dr. Kavanagh’s internship and residency was at the Mayo Clinic, Mayo Graduate School of Medicine in Rochester, Minnesota, where he also served on the faculty for seven years. He was on the teaching staff at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven for five years, was a consultant to the Department of Orthopedics at the Mayo Clinic, where he specialized in hip and knee reconstruction, and also an instructor for the hip and knee total joint fellowship program.

Dr. Miller  Seth Miller, MD is a board-certified orthopedic surgeon specializing in arthroscopic shoulder surgery and shoulder replacement at ONS. He is a staff orthopedic physician at Greenwich Hospital and is Assistant Attending Physician in Orthopedic Surgery at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Dr. Miller served as orthopedic consultant to the New York Mets for nine years, attending spring training and regular Major League season games where he oversaw the physical condition of players. Dr. Miller has performed over 1000 total shoulder and reverse shoulder replacements, the most significant breakthrough in shoulder replacement surgery in the last 30 years.

To learn more about Joint Replacement Surgery, click here.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit http://onsmd.com/ or call 203.869.1145.

ONS Foundation Along With NFL Alumni Chapter Held Concussion Talk at Greenwich Library

Concussions are the hot topic in the NFL and on high school and college campuses across the country with ongoing concern about the brain health of players of contact sports.

The ONS Foundation wants to raise awareness about the risk of concussion and help educate high school athletes about concussion signs and symptoms. According to neurosurgeon Dr. Scott Simon of the ONS Foundation, concussions are the most common type of brain injury sustained in sports and most concussions do NOT involve loss of consciousness.

Where: Cole Auditorium at Greenwich Library
When: Tuesday, November 19th, 2013 @ 7:00 pm

For more information, click the link below:
http://www.onsfoundation.org/home/concussions/

 

ONS Launches Women’s Sports Medicine Center

WSMC group photo cu
Women’s Sports Medicine Panel

ONS is pleased to announce the opening of the Women’s Sports Medicine Center. The physician and physical therapy team—Katie Vadasdi, MD (Orthopedic Surgeon, Sports Medicine Specialist), Gloria Cohen, MD (Primary Care Sports Medicine Physician, Olympic team physician), Tamar Kessel, MD (Physiatrist, Interventional Sports and Spine) and Laura Liebesman, PT (Director of ONS Physical Therapy with PT specialties in golf mechanics, orthopedics and spine)—treats active women of all ages and levels of sports activity through a multidisciplinary and coordinated approach. In addition to being experts in their fields, the team consists of current and former athletes and fitness enthusiasts who know first-hand what it takes to train and excel in a sport.

“The Women’s Sports Medicine Center at ONS is about women treating women,” said
Dr. Vadasdi, an accomplished tri-athlete who has completed two Ironman competitions, is an alpine climber and has ascended Mount Kilimanjaro, Mount Rainier and the Grand Teton.

“We are female athletes and health care professionals, and we understand that female athletes have specific needs,” Vadasdi continued. “We gear our multi-disciplinary approach to address injury prevention and treatment, as well as health maintenance.”

The ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center specializes in the medical team concept to provide diagnoses for acute, sub-acute and chronic sports-related musculoskeletal complaints, including shoulder instability, rotator cuff tears, tennis/golf elbow, hip impingement, knee injuries, tendonitis, concussions, stress fractures and musical sprains and strains. The Center will also act as an advisory resource for women’s sports teams and treatments for individual players.

Katie Vadasdi, MD, Gloria Cohen, MD, Tamar Kessel, MD and Laura Liebesman, PT are available to speak at women’s organizations and wellness events, conferences, specialized clubs (e.g., running, swimming and figure-skating) and community centers. Selected topics include “Female Athlete Triad,” “Shin Splints and Stress Fractures,” “Injury and Prevention for the Female Cyclist,” “Exercise in Pregnancy and Postpartum,” “Dance Injuries: Readiness for Pointe,” “ACL Injury Prevention for Athletes” and “Back Pain and Spinal Stress Injuries.”

On Tuesday, November 5 at 6:30 p.m., Greenwich Hospitalwill host a Women’s Sports Medicine Forum, “Women Treating Women.” The event, which takes place in the Noble Conference Room, will feature the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine experts in a panel discussion regarding the latest diagnostic and medical management techniques for injuries and conditions common in female athletes.

The public is invited to bring their sports injury or fitness-related questions and get answers from a team of physicians who have provided medical support to five Olympic Games, international biking and fencing championships, and medical coverage for the Columbia University sports teams and Greenwich High School sports.

ONS is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice serving patients throughout Fairfield and Westchester Counties and the New York Metropolitan area. ONS physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com, or call (203) 869-1145

 

Cartilage Transplantation Offers New Hope for Damaged Knees

Delos Office Vertical
Dr. Demetris Delos

Speaker: Orthopaedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist Demetris Delos, MD

Tuesday, October 29th, 6:30 pm, Noble Conference Room Center at Greenwich Hospital

Cartilage transplantation offers exciting new treatment options for adults under the age of 50 who have had their knee damaged through acute or chronic trauma to the knee. The surgeon uses small cylindrical plugs of good cartilage and inserts them into the damaged areas. This procedure has been shown to be highly effective in patients who have sustained a specific injury to the knee cartilage or joint lining, and who have not yet developed arthritis. Many competitive athletes who have undergone the treatment have returned to their full performance level after surgery.

To register To register for the ONS programs at Greenwich Hospital, please call (203)
863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register on-line at www.greenhosp.org.

 

 

Greenwich Hospital New Mini-Med Seminar series begins with talk on Joint Disease by Paul Sethi, MD

Paul Sethi, MD
Orthopaedic surgeon Paul Sethi, MD

On Wednesday, March 13 at 6:30-7:30 p.m., Greenwich Hospital will begin a new Mini-Med Seminar series. The first program, “Let’s talk about Joints: Degenerative Joint Disease (DJD); Causes, Symptoms and Treatments,” will be presented by ONS orthopaedic Surgeon Dr. Paul Sethi in Hospital’s Noble Conference Center at 5 Perryridge Road. Attendance is free. To register, call 203-863-4277 or 888-305-9253, or register online.

Also known as osteoarthritis, DJD affects over 30 percent of the US population over age 65 and is characterized by joint pain and stiffness and a progressive loss of mobility. DJD occurs when the cartilage that cushions the joint breaks down and begins to wear away. By 2030, a projected 67 million people will have been diagnosed with DJD. Understanding the latest research on the causes of the disease and the surgical and non-surgical treatment options will be the focus of this seminar. Dr. Paul Sethi, who is also President of the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education, will lead this educational and interactive program.

Greenwich Hospital Mini-Med seminars offers tuition-free monthly programs that focus on basic anatomy and physiology, common disease conditions, and possible cures and treatment options. The series aims to introduce the public to the science of human health and the groundbreaking changes taking place in the field of medicine today. The audience will gain a greater awareness of significant health issues, and about the role of medical research in advancing healthcare. The seminars are presented by Greenwich Hospital staff physicians and are designed to be causal and highly informative. No science or medical background required! Ample time will be given to a question and answer period. Whether you’re a student, teacher, caregiver, healthcare provider, or someone with an interest in research and medicine, you will gain a better understanding of basic terms and medical concepts from the seminars.

ONS Doctors focus on prevention of Sports Injuries in youth athletes

ONS Foundation Program presented by Dr. Tim Greene and Dr. Scott Simon focuses on prevention of Sports Injuries in youth athletes at Bruce Museum.

 

 

On Tuesday, June 5 at 7:30 p.m., orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist Dr. Tim Greene and neurosurgeon Dr. Scott Simon will present The “Impact” of Sports, a program on general sports injury prevention and concussion prevention and management in high school and college athletics at the Bruce Museum located at 1 Museum Drive.  The program, which is designed for students as well as parents and coaches, will reveal the reasons that sports injuries are on the rise in youth athletes and what can be done to prevent kids from getting injuries that may have a lifelong impact. An informal Q and A period will follow the presentations.  Admission is free, but advance reservations are recommended. To register, call the Bruce Museum at (203) 869-0376.

Scott Simon, MD regularly speaks to school and community groups about the dangers of concussion and is affiliated with ThinkFirst, a national organization committed to public education and injury prevention of head and spinal cord injuries.  Dr. Simon specializes in the treatment of spinal disorders including operative and non-operative treatment of scoliosis. He graduated from medical school at UMDNJ – New Jersey Medical School. He completed his residency at The University of Pennsylvania Department of Neurosurgery and his fellowship training in spine surgery and scoliosis at The Schriners Hospital for Children, in Philadelphia.

Tim Greene, MD is fellowship trained in sports medicine and hip arthroscopy. He graduated Princeton University and earned his medical degree at the Medical College of Georgia. He performed a residency in orthopedics at Emory University and served as associate team physician to the athletic teams at Georgia Tech. Dr. Greene completed fellowship training at the Steadman Hawkins Clinic in Vail, Colorado under the direction of Dr. Marc Philippon. Where he served as associate team physician for the U.S. Ski Team.

The ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education provides expertise and guidelines for sports-related injury prevention for athletes, coaches as well as the aging population. The Foundation is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park, 10 Valley Drive, Greenwich, CT. For further information about the ONS Foundation, visit www.ons-foundation.org or call (203) 869-3131.

 

Upcoming Free Seminars by ONS at Greenwich Hospital

Mark your calendars for these upcoming seminars by
ONS physicians!

Low Back Pain and Spine Disorders

Neurosurgeon Scott Simon, MD

Tuesday, February 7, 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Greenwich Hospital, Noble Conference Center

Join neurosurgeon, Scott Simon, MD as he dispels myths about what works and what doesn’t work to treat low back pain. He will talk about prevention of low back injury, the importance of proper diagnostics and review “what’s new” in treatments.

Dr. Simon specializes in the treatment of spinal disorders. He is one of a few physicians nationwide who is trained in both neurological surgery and orthopedic techniques to treat scoliosis in adolescents and adults and is an expert in minimally invasive spine surgery. Dr. Simon graduated from UMDNJ – New Jersey Medical School. He performed his residency at The University of Pennsylvania and did Fellowship training in spine surgery and scoliosis at The Schriners Hospital for Children, in Philadelphia.

To register, call 203-863-4277 or 888-305-9253.

Or register online.

 

Joint Replacement Educational Seminar

Wednesday, March, 28, 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Greenwich Library Cole Auditorium
101 West Putnam Avenue, Greenwich

Speakers: Joint replacement specialists Frank Ennis, MD and Brian Kavanagh, MD

Many people suffer from severe pain caused by arthritis, a fracture or other conditions that make common activities such as walking, putting on shoes or getting in and out of a car, extremely difficult. Today, over 600,000 hip and knee replacement surgeries are performed each year in the United States. Deciding if- and when- it’s time to consider joint replacement surgery are important decisions.

Greenwich Hospital will host a Joint Replacement Educational Seminar at the Greenwich Library led by orthopedic experts Dr. Frank Ennis and Dr. Brian Kavanagh that will provide answers to many commonly asked questions, including how to know if you need a hip or knee replacement, the best way to prepare for surgery, and what to expect from the recovery and rehabilitation process. The surgeons will also discuss what’s new in the field of joint replacement and how materials and techniques have improved over the years.

Registration is required. To register, call 203-863-4277 or 888-305-9253. The Joint Replacement Educational Seminar will also be made available in an online video on the hospital website, www.greenhosp.org and at www.onsmd.com after April 11.