ONS Orthopedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist, Timothy Greene, MD Gives Insight on Paul George Injury

Time Greene, MDTeam USA’s scrimmage this past Friday night was definitely one to remember; and not in a good way. ONS Orthopedic Surgeon and fellowship trained Sports Medicine Specialist, Timothy Greene, MD, gives us some insight on NBA Super Star, Paul George’s gruesome injury that caused jaws to drop and made an entire arena become strikingly silent.

“NBA star Paul George sustained a gruesome leg injury during Friday night’s Team USA basketball game in Las Vegas. While trying to contest a layup, George’s leg hit the basketball stanchion causing an open tibia/fibular fracture. The injury consists of a complete break of the shin bone and small bone in the lowerleg that penetrates through the skin. When the bone penetrates the skin, there is an increased risk of infection and thus an urgent surgery was preformed the night of the incident to clean and repair the ends of the bone and skin and place a rod in the shin bone.

The road to recovery will most likely be a long one for the NBA superstar. When the bone penetrates the skin, it increases the time for healing. Studies examining these types of injury show that it can take up to 6 months to get complete healing of the bone. Although we often see our professional athlete’s recover and return to a high level of play in a surprisingly rapid timeframe, it is not unreasonable to expect that Paul George may take an entire year to return to elite level basketball.”

To learn more about the incident, read this article by The Huffington Post.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists PC (ONS) is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice in Greenwich, CT. ONS physicians provide expertise in sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopaedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, please visit www.onsmd.com. 

Is the Screwball Pitch Hard on the Arm? ONS Orthopedic Surgeon Paul Sethi, MD Weighs In

BaseballWhen you think of baseball pitchers, what comes to mind? Fastball? Curveball?

These are common terms used to describe pitches thrown during Major League Baseball games. Professional pitchers that have perfected these two conventional styles may not have the special skill and expertise to pull off one of the most, if not the most difficult pitches in baseball history, the screwball.

New York Times article The Mystery of the Vanishing Screwball,” by Bruce Schoenfeld, describes the “screwball” as “erratic, irrational or illogical, unexpected.”

In his article, Schoenfeld writes about the screwball technique gleaning inside information from Hector Santiago of the Los Angeles Angels who says the secret to the pitch is “like driving with your right wheels going around a curve.”

Schoenfeld goes on to write that “Unlike the knuckleball, which is easy to throw but hard to master, the screwball requires special expertise just to get it to the plate. The successful screwball pitcher must overcome an awkward sensation that feels like tightening a pickle jar while simultaneously thrusting the wrist forward with extreme velocity.”

Chicago White Sox pitching coach Don Cooper is quoted in the article saying “the word on the street is that the screwball is hard on the arm.” Although there is no documentation of this, many experts continue to debate as to whether or not the intensity of such a throw is harmful to the arm.

According to the article, Schoenfeld found no existing research to help answer the screwball pitch question. That’s when he contacted ONS Orthopedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist Paul Sethi, MD.

Dr. Paul Sethi, a Connecticut orthopedist, was willing to help generate some new data. Sethi is a disciple of Dr. Frank Jobe, the man who did an ulnar collateral graft in Tommy John’s elbow in 1974 and so created the most famous baseball-medical connection since Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Dr. Paul Sethi
Paul Sethi, MD

I met Sethi at the Center for Motion Analysis in Farmington, Conn., in a 108-foot-long room as bright as an operating theater. A dozen cameras were mounted on the walls. A tattooed 26-year-old named Matt Bartolomei stood on a portable pitcher’s mound while technicians adhered sensors to his body.”

Dr. Sethi, along with a team of experts, were able to watch in slow motion and concluded that the force exerted on the elbow of the pitcher when he threw a screwball during the experiment was identical to that of a fastball or curveball.

“In fact, the screwball doesn’t exceed the fastball in any parameter.” The results were hardly definitive, especially given the data set of one. “But looking at the data compared to the normative data kind of makes me tingly,” Sethi said.

If he and Nissen could confirm the conclusions, Sethi believed they might rescue the screwball from near-extinction. While assisting Jobe in Los Angeles, he worked with Dodgers pitchers. He liked the idea of contributing to their cause. I was less certain, though, that a doctor could revive the flat lining screwball. For a pitch to be used regularly by major leaguers, or even Little Leaguers, it needed a stronger selling point than mere safety.”

Although the “screwball” has been somewhat “abandoned” by baseball, the research conducted by Dr. Sethi and the team he worked with could make for a comeback. In a phone message yesterday Dr. Sethi confirmed, “the “screwball” pitch isn’t a cause for higher risk of injury than that of a fastball or knuckleball. It puts the same amount of stress on the arm as the other pitches do.”

Paul Sethi, MD is a board-certified orthopedic surgeon who specializes in sports medicine, the shoulder and elbow. He served as an orthopedic consultant to the Los Angeles Dodgers baseball team. Sethi was also a former assistant team physician of the Los Angeles Lakers basketball team, Los Angeles Kings hockey team, Los Angeles Dodgers, and University of Southern California football team.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists PC (ONS) is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice in Greenwich, CT. ONS physicians provide expertise in sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopaedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, please visit www.onsmd.com.

[Read Full New York Times Article]

Is tennis your game? Do you love the pace on the squash or paddle court?

RacketSportsTennisWoman If you love racket sports, you might already know what it’s like to experience a rolled ankle or shoulder strain. Injury prevention is the key to staying in the game and ONS is here to help you keep your swing healthy! On Tuesday, May 13th at 6:30 p.m. in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, come hear sports medicine physician Gloria Cohen, MD, orthopedic surgeon Katie Vadasdi, MD, physical therapist Tatyana Kalyuzhny, PT, DPT, MDT and Patrick Hirscht, Tennis Pro, Round Hill Club in Greenwich discuss how to avoid the most common injuries in racket sports like Achilles tendon tears, shoulder and wrist injuries and rolled and sprained ankles. Learn to recognize injury warning signs and know when it’s time to see a doctor. The panel will discuss injury prevention and the latest orthopedic treatments.

Dr. Katie Vadasdi, head of the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center shares her medical expertise and experience in treating these types of injuries saying “racket sports can lead to overuse injuries due to the repetitive motions required in these sports. We most commonly see shoulder and elbow injuries including impingement of the rotator cuff and inflammation of the tendons in the elbow also known as tennis elbow. Early in the season, it is important to gradually increase intensity and duration of play to reduce the risk of developing such overuse injuries. If an athlete develops pain, it is important to rest in order to allow for appropriate recovery.  This can often prevent the development of more serious injuries.  If pain persists in spite of rest, then an athlete should reach out to a medical professional for further diagnosis and management options”.

Come to the seminar to learn more! Seminar is free. Registration requested.

For more information on shoulder injuries/surgery click here!

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit http://onsmd.com/ or call 203.869.1145.

ONS Sports Medicine Specialist, Gloria Cohen, MD on Cycling Injuries

GloriaCohenbikingWEB_SMLike all activities engaged in regularly, cycling has its share of common ailments and injuries.  Many of the overuse injuries result from attempting to do too much, too soon. Poor riding technique, and improper frame fit for the individual may also cause injuries. Riding too many miles or tackling too many hills in too high a gear will stress the musculoskeletal system, especially at the start of the cycling season.

Knee pain is the most common complaint and is usually related to the tracking of the kneecap, or “patella” in the mid-groove of the thigh bone or “femur.”  The symptoms of “biker’s knee,” also known as “patellofemoral pain syndrome,” usually result from a combination of malalignment of the extensor mechanism of the knee, muscle imbalance, and improper set-up on the bike.  Each cyclist presents with differences in biomechanics (flat pronated feet, bow legs, etc.) and muscle conditioning (strength and flexibility) that can predispose to this condition.  It is important to avoid riding with high pedal resistance at a low cadence as this puts excessive pressure across the knee joint. The rule of the road is “if the knees hurt gear down.”

Some common riding errors are riding with the saddle too low or too far forward and poor foot position or improper cleat adjustment.  This can lead to other musculoskeletal injuries such as neck problems, or Achilles tendinitis.

We must not forget that traumatic injuries can occur when we least expect it. Wear an approved bicycle helmet at all times while cycling. Remember to replace your helmet if you are involved in a bike crash while wearing it. It will likely not perform for you the second time.

Gloria Cohen, MD is a specialist in non-operative sports medicine. She is a primary care team physician for the Columbia University varsity athletic teams and lecturer in the Department of Orthopaedics at Columbia University and served as team physician to the Canadian National Olympic Cycling Team for 14 years and was a member of the Canadian Medical Team for the Olympic Games in Seoul, Atlanta, and Sydney. She travels regularly with the Columbia University varsity football team, the Lions and is recognized as an authority in sports medicine in the United States and Canada.

Dr. Cohen believes in taking an integrative approach to medical management by considering a patients’ bio-mechanics, cardio-vascular and pulmonary function as it relates to athletic performance. Dr. Cohen is a successful competitive runner who has qualified twice for the New York Marathon. She is also an off-road and road cyclist and will be a featured speaker at Cycle Strong! A Sports Conditioning and Injury Prevention Workshop for Cycling Enthusiasts! This event is presented by ONS Foundation for Clinical Research, Inc. and sponsored by the North Castle Library, Armonk. For more information visit the ONS Foundation website.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit http://onsmd.com/ or call 203.869.1145.

Looks like more snow is in the forecast, we have some skiing tips for you!

skierThe knee is the most vulnerable body part for any athlete, including skiers. Downhill skiing produces large amounts of torque on the knee, challenging the integrity of ligaments and tendons. Whether from a fall or overuse, the most common injuries in skiers are tears to the MCL (Medial Collateral Ligament) or ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament), two important structures that give our knee stability.  When a skier is thrown off balance, his skis will sometimes shoot out in front of him, creating extra torque on the knees and damaging our stabilizing structures.

Both novice and experienced skiers are at risk of hurting their knees. We frequently see novice skiers hurt themselves when they do not know how to turn, stop or fall properly. Taking lessons and working with an instructor goes a long way in preventing knee injuries for beginner skiers. Experienced skiers frequently take risks and assume that they can manage faster speeds on any slope.  Many injuries, whether you are a beginner or an experienced skier, are related to weather conditions. It is important to realize that as visibility and surface conditions deteriorate, the slope or trail level goes up. In poor visibility or icy conditions, a beginner trail becomes an intermediate trail, and an intermediate slope becomes advanced slope. Keep injury prevention in mind, if the conditions are difficult, ski down a level.

A second reason injuries occur is fatigue. Most skiers’ bodies are not accustomed to exercising 6-8 straight hours. In addition, many skiers push their bodies to take advantage of the whole day, even when they start to feel tired and stiff.  For this reason, injuries tend to happen at the end of the day.

Having the knowledge of what places skiers at a higher risk for knee injuries, we are passing on recommendations about how to stay safe on the slopes.  Both beginners and experienced skiers can benefit from these tips!

  1. Start a conditioning program a few months before your first ski trip. Leg strengthening, flexibility and balance are important aspects of an adequate ski conditioning program.
  2. Ski with good technique. Maintain your balance and control, keep your hips above your knees, keep your arms forward, and maintain a safe speed.
  3. Learn how to fall correctly: keep your legs together, keep your chin to your chest and your arms up and forward.
  4. Pay attention to weather conditions and remember to ski down a level if conditions deteriorate.
  5. Listen to your body. If you start to feel pain or stiffness upon exiting the lift chair, then you should probably make that run your last. Head to the lodge and enjoy a warm drink by the fire.

Good luck and stay warm!

If you become injured, while skiing, remember, ONS sports medicine physicians are trained at the top universities and hospitals in the country and have expertise in the latest treatments for sports-related injuries in high-performance and recreational athletes.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit http://onsmd.com/ or call 203.869.1145.

 

Ever Injured Yourself Skiing or Snowboarding?

Have you ever injured yourself skiing or snowboarding? Injuries on the slopes can ruin a good season, even for the pros. Just last week, we posted Dr. Katie Vadasdi’s discussion about the knee injury of Olympic Gold Medalist, Lindsey Vonn whose injury forced her to pull out of the upcoming Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics. Recently, another famed Olympian suffered an ankle injury.

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Two-time Olympic Gold Medalist, Shaun White suffered a sprained left ankle Thursday during the Slopestyle qualifiers. He landed the Olympic spot in Slopestyle but decided not to attend the X Games in Aspen this coming weekend.  “So far, the plan is still not to attend X,” White said Friday. “Especially considering how much work this has been to qualify for the Olympics. It’s that time of, what do I really want to work on before the Olympics and you’ve only got one week to really crank it out.”

ONS orthopedic and trauma specialist surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, who specializes in foot and ankle surgery and is a panel speaker for topics such as ski and snowboarding injuries shared his expert opinion on Shaun’s decision saying, “I think he made the right decision in taking a break this weekend and not attending the X Games. Shaun White, being one of the best, if not, the best athlete in his sport, knows what he can and cannot handle. He knows he can push the very difficult tricks and moves that he does. The Olympics are once every 4 years, it is critical to prepare and not over-do it especially when healing a previous injury.”

Hindman_web

Another expert opinion came from ONS orthopedic surgeon Michael Clain, MD, who specializes in foot and ankle surgery and sports medicine. Dr. Clain said “most ankle sprains are fine with rest, immobilization and rehab. I’d expect him to be able to compete just fine at the level for which he qualified for.”

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When you have a mild sprain, remember rest, immobilization and rehab are best before you head back to the slopes.

For more on ski and snowboarding injury prevention, click below
http://bit.ly/1bDVuy9

For more on foot and ankle conditions and treatments, click below http://onsmd.com/specialty/foot-and-ankle/

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com or call 203.869.1145.

 

 

ONS Knee Specialist Dr. Katie Vadasdi discusses Olympic Athlete Lindsey Vonn’s Injury

The ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center team of experts consists of current and former athletes and fitness enthusiasts who know firsthand what it takes to train and excel in a sport. With the 2014 Olympics just a few weeks away, ONS orthopedic surgeon and women’s sports medicine specialist, Katie Vadasdi, MD, shared her expert opinion on one of the latest setbacks in Olympic history.

DrVadasdi_WEB

In recent news, US skiing champion, and Olympic gold medalist Lindsey Vonn stated that she would be pulling out of the 2014 Sochi Olympics in Russia. The famed downhill skier experienced a series of knee injuries which led to her decision not compete.  When asked about Lindsey’s decision, Dr. Vadasdi said, “Vonn has made an appropriate but difficult decision to pull out of the winter Olympics this year in order to give her knee the medical attention it requires.  Her sport requires an incredible amount of strength and having an unstable knee puts her in a dangerous position where she might further injure her knee or cause other injuries.”

Last February, Lindsey tore two ligaments in her right knee and broke a bone in the same leg during an intense crash at the world championships. Upon returning to the sport, Vonn reinjured her surgically repaired ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) when she crashed during a training session. Two weeks later, Lindsey suffered another injury when she sprained her MCL (medial collateral ligament), during a downhill event. After reconstructive knee surgery in February 2013, Vonn posted on Facebook that she “is devastated” to miss the Olympics, “but the reality has sunk in that my knee is just too unstable to compete at this level.”

Each year, at least 1 in 3,000 Americans between the ages of 14 and 55 tear an ACL while exercising or playing sports.  Skiers are among the group of athletes who are more likely to experience an ACL injury. Dr. Vadasdi said of Vonn’s injury, “she will undergo ACL reconstruction which will provide her knee the stability it requires to return to such highly-competitive skiing.” A reconstructed ACL not only stabilizes the knee, but also prevents damage to the menisci cartilage that often occurs due to an unstable joint.

“By making the decision now to withdraw from the Olympics and to undergo the surgery, she will allow herself the necessary time to recover and fully rehab her knee to get her back on the slopes safely and at her height competitive level.”

To learn more about ACL Injuries, click here: http://onsmd.com/condition_treatment/acl-injuries/ and visit our Women’s Sports Medicine Center at http://onsmd.com/sports-medicine/womens-sports-medicine-center/.

Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists, PC (ONS) physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. The main office is located at 6 Greenwich Office Park on Valley Road, Greenwich, CT. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com or call 203.869.1145.

 

Calendar of Health Information Programs by ONS Physicians at Greenwich Hospital

PROGRAMS CALENDAR 2014

This year the physicians at ONS will present health information seminars for the public on a variety of topics ranging from joint replacement to common soccer injuries, injury prevention and treatments. Sessions to take place in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich, and followed by a question and answer period where the public may pose questions to the presenters. To register for upcoming ONS programs at Greenwich Hospital, please call (203) 863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register on-line at http://www.greenhosp.org/.

2 APRIL 2014 – Joint Symposium, Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich <read more>

Past Topics

Knee Pain Seminar

Chichi_knee anatomy
For millions of Americans, knee pain is a daily reality. Many people try to ignore pain caused by arthritis in the knee joint for as long as possible in hopes that it will go away. However, arthritis is a progressive disease and for many, will even become debilitating. On December 3, 2013, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Demetris Delos presented a “Knee Pain Seminar” addressing treatment options for knee pain due to early-stage arthritis. He discussed non-operative and operative solutions from therapeutic injections, arthroscopic procedures to osteotomy and partial knee replacement. The seminar was free and open to the public.

Speaker: Orthopedic Surgeon Demetris Delos, MD

ONS is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice serving patients throughout Fairfield and Westchester Counties and the New York Metropolitan area. ONS physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com, or call (203) 869-1145.

Osteoporosis: Prevention, Treatment and Managementgraphic

Osteoporosis, a disease that weakens the bones and leads to fractures, affects 28 million Americans and contributes to an estimated 1.5 million bone fractures every year. Half of all women older than 65 and one in five men is affected by osteoporosis. On Wednesday, October 23, 2013 at 6:30 pm, physicians with ONS and Greenwich Hospital hosted a seminar on Osteoporosis: Prevention, Treatment and Management. The public was invited to hear from medical experts what measures may be taken to prevent bone loss or minimize its effects. Presenters included Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Endocrinologist Ranee Lleva, MD, and Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter. The program took place in the Noble Conference Center at Greenwich Hospital, 5 Perryridge Road and was free of charge. To register for ONS programs at Greenwich Hospital, please call (203) 863-4277 or (888) 305-9253, or register on-line at www.greenhosp.org. For more information on topics related to orthopedics, visit www.onsmd.com

Speakers: Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Endocrinologist Ranee Lleva, MD, and Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter. Wednesday, October 23, 6:30-8 pm

Cartilage Transplantation Offers New Hope for Damaged Knees

Delos Office Vertical
Dr. Demetris Delos

Cartilage transplantation offers exciting new treatment options for adults under the age of 50 who have had their knee damaged through acute or chronic trauma to the knee. The surgeon uses small cylindrical plugs of good cartilage and inserts them into the damaged areas. This procedure has been shown to be highly effective in patients who have sustained a specific injury to the knee cartilage or joint lining, and who have not yet developed arthritis. Many competitive athletes who have undergone the treatment have returned to their full performance level after surgery.

Speaker: Orthopaedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist Demetris Delos, MD

Women’s Sports Medicine Center forum at Greenwich Hospital

WSMC group photo cu

Who would know better how to treat active women of all ages and levels of sports activity than the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center physician and physical therapy team?

In addition to being experts in their fields as orthopedic surgeons and sports medicine specialists, the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center team is comprised of current and former athletes and fitness enthusiasts who know first-hand what it takes to train and excel in a sport. (In fact, Dr. Katie Vadasdi, an orthopedic surgeon, is an accomplished tri-athlete who has completed two Ironman competitions, is an alpine climber and has ascended Mount Kilimanjaro, Mount Rainier and the Grand Teton.)

Come hear the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center panel discussion hosted by Greenwich Hospital:

“Women Treating Women”

The event, which took place in the Noble Conference Room at Greenwich Hospital, featured the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine experts in a panel discussion regarding the latest diagnostic and medical management techniques for injuries and conditions common in female athletes.

The public was invited to bring their sports injury or fitness-related questions and get answers from a team of physicians who have provided medical support to five Olympic Games, international biking and fencing championships, and medical coverage for the Columbia University sports teams and Greenwich High School sports.

Women’s Sports Medicine Panel:

Katie Vadasdi, MD, Orthopedic Surgeon, Sports Medicine Specialist Fellowship Training: Columbia University Medical Center

Gloria Cohen, MD, Primary Care Sports Medicine, Olympic Team Physician Post Graduate Sports Medicine, University of British Columbia

Tamar Kessel, MD, Physiatrist, Interventional Sports and Spine Fellowship Training: Hospital for Special Surgery

Laura Liebesman, PT, Director of ONS Physical Therapy Specialties- Golf mechanics, Orthopedics and Spine PT Certification – University of Pennsylvania

 

ONS Foundation Along With NFL Alumni Chapter Held Concussion Talk at Greenwich Library

Concussions are the hot topic in the NFL and on high school and college campuses across the country with ongoing concern about the brain health of players of contact sports.

The ONS Foundation wants to raise awareness about the risk of concussion and help educate high school athletes about concussion signs and symptoms. According to neurosurgeon Dr. Scott Simon of the ONS Foundation, concussions are the most common type of brain injury sustained in sports and most concussions do NOT involve loss of consciousness.

Where: Cole Auditorium at Greenwich Library
When: Tuesday, November 19th, 2013 @ 7:00 pm

For more information, click the link below:
http://www.onsfoundation.org/home/concussions/

 

ONS Foundation Discussion: Concussion Prevention & Management Strategies for Youth Athletes

On Tuesday, November 19th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Cole Auditorium at Greenwich Library, The ONS Foundation and the NFL Alumni Chapterwill present a free seminar on Youth Sports Concussion Awareness and Prevention. The Greenwich Branch of Wells Fargo Advisors is pleased to sponsor the ONSF/CT NFL Alumni Chapter Concussion Seminar.

Concussions are a hot topic in the NFL and in high schools and colleges across the country with particular concern about the brain health of players of contact sports. The ONS Foundation and the NFL Alumni Connecticut Chapter want to raise awareness and educate parents and coaches of youth athletes about the signs and symptoms of concussion.

The discussion will cover the latest information on concussion management on the field, in the doctor’s office and what parents/coaches/teachers need to know to support recovery from concussion.

Speakers include:
Tim Hasselback– ESPN Analyst, retired NFL Quarterback: Greenwich Youth Football Coach

Steve Thurlow– President NFL Alumni CT Chapter- Retired Running Back for the Redskins and New York Giants

Panelists Include:
President of the ONS Foundation, ONS Orthopedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist, Paul M. Sethi, MD

Tricia McDonough Ryan, PhD

ONS Spine Surgery Specialist Mark Camel, MD.

Kindly RSVP to Kelly McCory, NFL Alumni CT Chapter at m3kellymc@aol.com

ONS Launches Women’s Sports Medicine Center

WSMC group photo cu
Women’s Sports Medicine Panel

ONS is pleased to announce the opening of the Women’s Sports Medicine Center. The physician and physical therapy team—Katie Vadasdi, MD (Orthopedic Surgeon, Sports Medicine Specialist), Gloria Cohen, MD (Primary Care Sports Medicine Physician, Olympic team physician), Tamar Kessel, MD (Physiatrist, Interventional Sports and Spine) and Laura Liebesman, PT (Director of ONS Physical Therapy with PT specialties in golf mechanics, orthopedics and spine)—treats active women of all ages and levels of sports activity through a multidisciplinary and coordinated approach. In addition to being experts in their fields, the team consists of current and former athletes and fitness enthusiasts who know first-hand what it takes to train and excel in a sport.

“The Women’s Sports Medicine Center at ONS is about women treating women,” said
Dr. Vadasdi, an accomplished tri-athlete who has completed two Ironman competitions, is an alpine climber and has ascended Mount Kilimanjaro, Mount Rainier and the Grand Teton.

“We are female athletes and health care professionals, and we understand that female athletes have specific needs,” Vadasdi continued. “We gear our multi-disciplinary approach to address injury prevention and treatment, as well as health maintenance.”

The ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center specializes in the medical team concept to provide diagnoses for acute, sub-acute and chronic sports-related musculoskeletal complaints, including shoulder instability, rotator cuff tears, tennis/golf elbow, hip impingement, knee injuries, tendonitis, concussions, stress fractures and musical sprains and strains. The Center will also act as an advisory resource for women’s sports teams and treatments for individual players.

Katie Vadasdi, MD, Gloria Cohen, MD, Tamar Kessel, MD and Laura Liebesman, PT are available to speak at women’s organizations and wellness events, conferences, specialized clubs (e.g., running, swimming and figure-skating) and community centers. Selected topics include “Female Athlete Triad,” “Shin Splints and Stress Fractures,” “Injury and Prevention for the Female Cyclist,” “Exercise in Pregnancy and Postpartum,” “Dance Injuries: Readiness for Pointe,” “ACL Injury Prevention for Athletes” and “Back Pain and Spinal Stress Injuries.”

On Tuesday, November 5 at 6:30 p.m., Greenwich Hospitalwill host a Women’s Sports Medicine Forum, “Women Treating Women.” The event, which takes place in the Noble Conference Room, will feature the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine experts in a panel discussion regarding the latest diagnostic and medical management techniques for injuries and conditions common in female athletes.

The public is invited to bring their sports injury or fitness-related questions and get answers from a team of physicians who have provided medical support to five Olympic Games, international biking and fencing championships, and medical coverage for the Columbia University sports teams and Greenwich High School sports.

ONS is an advanced multi-specialty orthopedic and neurosurgery practice serving patients throughout Fairfield and Westchester Counties and the New York Metropolitan area. ONS physicians provide expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries, sports medicine, minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, joint replacement and trauma. For more information, visit www.onsmd.com, or call (203) 869-1145

 

Preventing Squash Injuries

ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Specialist Dr. Katie Vadasdi to discuss how to prevent Squash injuries at Greenwich Academy!

ATTENTION SQUASH PLAYERS!vadas

 

Please join us for an open discussion with Dr. Katie Vadasdi of ONS (Orthopedic & Neurosurgery Specialists)

Learn how to prevent injury, stay healthy and stretch correctly to maximize playing experience

WHEN:
Saturday November 2nd from 9:30am-10:45am

WHERE:
Greenwich Academy (200 North Maple Avenue, Greenwich) in the athletic conference room.  Come and go depending on squash start times for players in the Greenwich Gold Tournament.

 

All ages welcome! Ad

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Don’t Miss Out! Hurry and Sign Up for The ONS Foundation PLAY Strong, PLAY Safe 5K Race/Walk!

 

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On Sunday, September 22, the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education PLAY Strong PLAY Safe 5K Run/Walk will take place in Old Greenwich. Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Katie Vadasdi and Joseph “Casey” McKee will serve as event Co-chairs. “It seems only fitting that the ONS Foundation host a 5K race to benefit the organization’s research and education around treatment and prevention of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries,” said Dr. Vadasdi. “What better venue for highlighting the importance of mobility and physical health at any age than a 5K walk/run aimed at the whole family.” Proceeds from the PLAY Strong PLAY Safe 5K will benefit the Foundation’s education initiatives as well as the youth sports programs of the OGRCC. Details about the event and registration are available online at http://www.onsf.org/. Registration packets may be picked up on Saturday, September 21, at OGRCC between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. or on race day between 6 a.m. and 7:30 a.m. Same day registrations are accepted.

The race will begin in front of the OGRCC (Old Greenwich Riverside Community Center) on Harding Road at 8 a.m. on Sunday. The USATF certified 5K course travels through scenic residential areas of Old Greenwich. The course goes south past the Innis Arden Club and is relatively flat for the first 2 miles. Bypassing downtown Old Greenwich, runners and walkers will encounter a hill as they leave the Binney Park area and enter Summit Road. Then, the course runs adjacent to the Riverside School before turning onto Owenoke Way and on to the finish line at the OGRCC.

“The course is designed for all athletic abilities whether you are a serious runner or a power walker,” said Dr. Vadasdi who is also an accomplished triathlete. “We invite elite runners, corporate challenge teams, joggers, student athletes, weekend warriors, power walkers and families to participate.

ONS Foundation 5K Run/Walk Facts

What: ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education Play Strong, Play Safe 5k Run/Walk

When: Sunday, September 22, 2013
Packet Pick Up/Race Day Registration 6 – 7:30 a.m.
5K Start 8 a.m.
Kids 0.5 Mile Costume Run/Walk 9 a.m.

Where: Meet at (OGRCC) Old Greenwich-Riverside Community Center
90 Harding Road, Old Greenwich, CT 06870

Registration details: Register and pick up packets -Saturday, September 21, at OGRCC from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Includes a Race T-Shirt)

Fees:
Adults: $40
Students (12-18 years): $25
Child (8-11 years): $15
Child (7 & younger): FREE

In addition to the race, the event will feature a Health Expo located at the OGRCC where participants and their families will be able to learn more about nutrition, training, injury prevention and running equipment. “We are fortunate to have exhibits from ONS Physical Therapy, EHS PT, Greenwich Running Company and Green and Tonic,” said “Casey” McKee. “ONS doctors will also be on hand to host clinics on injury prevention and management”.

Sponsors for the ONS Foundation 5K include Greenwich Hospital Fairway Market, Elite Health Services, Greenwich Running Co., Jeep, Green and Tonic, Johnnie-O, and the Greenwich United Way. For information and online registration, go to http://www.ons-foundation.org/

The ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education, a Greenwich Hospital alliance, works to develop, validate, formalize and disseminate the latest advances in surgical techniques, rehabilitation protocols and clinical outcomes in orthopedics and neurosurgery to improve patient care on regional and national levels.

 

 

 

Dr. Tim Greene explains ITB Syndrome

Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS) is a common injury in runners of all levels that is caused by friction between the iliotibial band and the outer aspect of the knee or hip.  When the knee reaches 20 to 30 degrees of flexion, the iliotibial band is closest to the outer aspect of the knee which may produce friction and pain.  This syndrome, which can be very painful, can be brought on from running downhill, uphill or at a slower pace, all of which place the knee at a lower flexion angle in the 20 to 30 degree range. Runners with anatomic variations of the leg that place it in an inwardly rotated position may predispose to this condition. Flat feet (pronation), knocked knees (valgus) and weak outer hip muscles are all associated with an inward position of the leg.

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Dr. Timothy Green examining a patient experiencing pain caused by ITBS.

IMG_2560Developing outer hip or knee pain after 2-3 consecutive runs may be a sign of ITBS. An adequate period of rest is the most important course of action in alleviating these symptoms. Continuing to run through the pain will only serve to worsen the symptoms. A proper warm-up and stretching of the iliotibial band is paramount in relieving and preventing ITBS.  Continued outer hip or knee pain at baseline or with the resumption of running after a 10 day to 2 week course of rest should warrant an evaluation by a sports medicine physician.

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The majority of ITBS resolves with the appropriate non-surgical management. This may include formal physical therapy, anti-inflammatory medication, or an injection of cortisone or platelets. In rare cases that fail a long course of non-surgical management, arthroscopic surgery to remove the inflamed tissue and loosen the tight iliotibial band maybe necessary.

Get in the know! ONS Physician Dr. Gloria Cohen discusses Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS).

What is it? How do you get it? How do you treat it?

What exactly is Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness?
DOMS, as it is also known, is the sensation of Cohenpain, soreness, and stiffness in exercised muscles after unaccustomed or strenuous exercise. This can occur from several hours to three days post exercise. Though the actual mechanism is not completely understood, Dr. Cohen says “studies suggest that symptoms develop as a result of microscopic damage to the muscle fibers involved in certain exercises, particularly in muscle cell membranes and the bands that connect muscle cells”.

After a workout, your body automatically begins the process of repairing the damage to muscle fibers causing low-grade pain. The saying “no pain, no gain” is actually accurate because although your overall fitness is improving, you will experience aches and pains along the way. Certain types of movement or exercise, known as eccentric muscle contractions where the muscle lengthens as it contracts, can cause low-grade pain. According to Dr. Cohen, an example of this is what happens as the quadriceps or thigh muscle engages while walking or running downhill.

NYRC Dash-SplashCan DOMS be prevented?? Dr. Cohen suggests “when starting a new exercise program, it is advisable to gradually increase the intensity of the program.” In other words, don’t overdo it! She also cautions, “beware of overstretching which can also result in sore muscles, especially if you haven’t warmed up adequately before exercising”. If these precautions don’t help, there are treatment approaches. “Increasing blood flow to the muscle and immersion in cool or icy water has shown to be effective in some studies”. According to Dr. Cohen, who also suggests refraining from the activity if symptoms occur, “if pain increases and becomes more severe- if there is swelling of the limb- or if you notice your urine color darken- seek medical attention. Muscle breakdown can put excess stress on the kidneys. When in doubt, see your doctor.”

 

Greenwich Hospital Appoints Steven Hindman, MD as Director of Orthopaedic Surgery

Orthopedic surgeon Steven Hindman, MD has bee appointed Director of Orthopedics at Greenwich Hospital.
Orthopedic surgeon Steven Hindman, MD has bee appointed Director of Orthopedics at Greenwich Hospital.

Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Steven Hindman has been named Director of Orthopedic Surgery at Greenwich Hospital. Dr. Hindman has been on staff at Greenwich Hospital since 1987 when he began his practice with Greenwich Orthopedic Associates on Lake Avenue. In 1992, the group moved into Greenwich Office Park on Valley Drive. They later merged with Orthopaedic Associates and formed ONS (Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists).

Dr. Hindman treats the full spectrum of orthopedic conditions and injuries from ankle sprains to ACL ruptures to degenerative joint disease. He is also actively involved in injury prevention on behalf of the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education, and speaks to community groups on fall prevention, skiing injuries and osteoporosis.

Dr. Hindman was born in Newtown, MA and graduated from University of Rochester, New York. He received his medical degree from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York in 1982 and did his residency in Orthopedic Surgery at Montefiore Hospital, Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York from 1982 to 1987. Dr. Hindman is Board Certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery and is a former Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He is included in the list of Castle Connolly New York Area Top Doctors.