Posted on October 3, 2014

OSTEO_graphicMost Americans spend too much time sitting and should take advantage of these tips to help keep good posture.

First, when sitting in a chair make sure your buttocks is all the way to the back of the chair. Using a lumbar roll in the small of your back will help to keep optimal alignment.

Second, if you  sit at a computer, your monitor should be at eye level, feet firmly on floor, hands and wrists in a straight line, shoulders back and elbows at 90 degrees. A break from sitting every 30 minutes will relieve your back of stresses placed on it while sitting. For a more detailed guide to improve seated posture, download Work Station Ergonomics  as a reference.

Posture is equally important when doing chores. While working, make sure your lower back is in a neutral position to avoid a forward curve in your spine. Watching your posture over the years will help avoid vertebral compression fractures due to osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis, or thinning bones, can result in painful fractures. Risk factors for osteoporosisosteoporosis include aging, being female, low body weight, low sex hormones or menopause, smoking, and some medications.

To learn more about osteoporosis, bone anatomy, fracture prevention exercises to promote bone health, updates on treatments, measures to promote strong bones and personal risk factors, register to attend a free health seminar on October 14, 2014 at Greenwich Hospital in the Noble Conference Room.  The panel of speaker include ONS Orthopedic Surgeon Steven Hindman, MD, Greenwich Hospital Endocrinologist Renee Ileva, MD and ONS Physical Therapist Betsy Kreuter, PT, CLT . After the seminar you will be able to ask the doctors and therapist questions.